U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-23-2017, 07:51 PM
 
5 posts, read 1,639 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Thank you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-23-2017, 07:54 PM
 
5 posts, read 1,639 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Usually I-5 > I-84 (Portland) >I-80 (SLC) through WY, then 287 south from Laramie to Ft Collins. (Have done it hundreds of times as truckdriver and living in WA and CO)

but... Nov means weather changes. (Be flexible)

From Seattle, I-90 to Buffalo, WY and then south on I-25 is another option (Mtns in WA, ID, MT) (Very windy in spring)

WY and UT will be the challenges and occasional freezing rain in OR (not likely in NOV).

Do a trip check and be flexible. All the DOT's now shut down Interstate highways with the least sign of danger. Luckily, the storms are short in Nov. 1-2 days.

If you can fit it in, and weather is nice... Leave I-80 eastbound at Saratoga WY, use the FREE hobo hot springs pool, and overnight if needed... then take Snowy Range to Centennial WY Spectacular!
https://www.travelwyoming.com/listin...e-scenic-byway
Wow! Thank you for the routes and advice. Looks like I have some pretty good options and should be okay. Thanks for helping me to be more confident.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-23-2017, 08:05 PM
 
5 posts, read 1,639 times
Reputation: 10
Smile Crossing the Rockies in November from West to East in Colorado Springs

Thank you so much for the advice, ideas of how to approach this trip and good wishes. I'm going to study the map and get familiar with the routes until I leave, and then I will check the weather and forecast to pick the best route. I haven't driven cross country in 30 years, so I'm a wreck, but it has to be done. I think if I plan and am prepared, I will be okay. I'm going to get chains for Colorado, just in case. I have brand new all terrain or all weather tires, but I'll have to check if they are winter tires. Thank you all so much. You've helped me more than you know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-23-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
4,873 posts, read 9,614,384 times
Reputation: 4942
Cathy, if you have all weather tires, then they aren't snow tires. A lot of people in Colorado have two sets of tires, because the secret to driving on snow is having the right tires. Since you'll be living here, you really do need to make the investment.

There have been discussions on this forum about tires, so it may help you to do a "Search" to read previous advice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2017, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,902 posts, read 6,492,373 times
Reputation: 7348
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChattyCathy13 View Post
Thank you so much for the advice, ideas of how to approach this trip and good wishes. I'm going to study the map and get familiar with the routes until I leave, and then I will check the weather and forecast to pick the best route. I haven't driven cross country in 30 years, so I'm a wreck, but it has to be done. I think if I plan and am prepared, I will be okay. I'm going to get chains for Colorado, just in case. I have brand new all terrain or all weather tires, but I'll have to check if they are winter tires. Thank you all so much. You've helped me more than you know.
Nobody I know uses chains. We use snow tires in the winter and change them out in the late spring. Well worth the investment. Chains are horrible to drive with. All season tires are not the same as snow tires. They are quite different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2017, 03:38 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,186 posts, read 8,311,347 times
Reputation: 7107
Carrying a set of chains in winter is like carrying a spare tire.

When you need them, you'll be glad you have them.

They are mainly used to get you thru a bad stretch of deep snow or ice, not for every trip just because it snowed a little that morning.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2017, 03:58 PM
 
11,256 posts, read 43,174,512 times
Reputation: 14904
IMO ... having frequently traveled all of these West coast to Rocky Mountain routes for over 50 years in all types of weather conditions ...

with your modern vehicle and decent all-season tires (M&S rated, right?)

if the road conditions are so poor due to slick snowpack and/or ice on your route that you'd need chains for traction

you are far better off and safer to stop enroute and wait for improving conditions. Stop earlier than later while the small towns along your route still have motel rooms available. What you don't want to do is find yourself slogging along in difficult driving conditions at 20-30 mph for some amount of time and finally reach a town only to discover that it's "sold out" already. BTDT, have spent more than a few nights (and days, too) in my vehicle.

Please understand that the driving conditions that present in the Rocky Mountain West are entirely different than the winter roads that you may be familiar with. The big difference here is the winds, which create obscured visibility conditions; ie, "white outs" where you cannot see much beyond the front of your hood, or blow snow across a roadway so that the road "disappears" and you're not able to see where you're going. I don't care how powerful the tire chains are that you might be carrying, they are of no benefit for this problem. And if the roads are so iced up (black ice) with the very thin layer that can make them so slick ... chains again are a secondary choice compared to waiting out the conditions. This is why WYDOT has chosen to close the roads sooner than they used to do ... because folk tend to press on into these treacherous conditions and get into off-road excursions and sometimes more serious accidents, including injury accidents (and fatalities). The first responders are the ones that have to deal with these situations, often at significant risk to themselves when a simple "wait it out awhile" approach by drivers would have been a simple, less costly, and far safer solution.

Yes, there are a lot of folk who can brag about having traveled these roads for years without incident ... but it's one of those situations where it's "no big deal" until the day comes that it IS a big deal. Many of them are "pro drivers" or folk who commuted on familiar highways and knew the trouble spots and limitations. It's unlikely that you, OP, have comparable skills and experience to deal with pushing into the nasty conditions that present. At that, I've spent many a night at roadside stops here in the West with a lot of pro semi-drivers who had open time in their logbooks and revenue miles to travel ... but chose to park their rigs until conditions improved.

You can literally drive right behind a highway snowplow and observe the roads disappearing again right after their passage. To get an idea as to how significant these conditions are, you can search "you tube" for rocky mountain winter travel/driving. There's a lot of videos taken by folk dealing with these conditions. Don't forget that it's not just the visibility and road surface conditions that can be a problem, but the "moving wall of white-out" that attends many other vehicles on the road with you. Many semi drivers can see further ahead than you and have better traction, and they will press on ... passing you until you reach a grade where they can't keep up the speed. Then you're passing them ... and back through that wall of limited visibility again. You may find that you're driving totally blind for some number of seconds in each of these passing situations.

Overall, my preferred route would be WyoNewk's suggestion. Pay close attention to the routes and weather patterns in the weeks before your intended departure and keep all your options open until the last minute. You may find that one route will be preferred, all will be in decent shape, or that all of them are a mess for awhile awaiting improving conditions due to a large regional stormfront passing through. Should you see clear routes ahead ... enjoy your drive. Should you see poor conditions forecast ... consider leaving earlier than originally planned, or delay your trip in circumstances of your choosing instead of letting the weather/roads dictate where/when you'll be stopping for awhile.

Good luck on your trip and drive safe.

PS: it's a rare road condition where deep snow will be a problem in this drive. The slick surfaces are usually due to black ice layers which form when the wet road surface freezes over. The ice can be no thicker than a sheet of paper, yet incredibly slick ... worse when it's covered with a bit of fresh snow. Keep in mind that the "fresh snow" doesn't have to be in a snowstorm, but blown onto the road from adjacent land back onto the road. You'll see "snow fences" along the highways in WY ... these are placed so as to divert the prevailing wind/blown snow onto the roadway and capture the snowdrifts. Sometimes they work very well ... sometimes the winds come from a different direction and the snow fence is no benefit. Keep your eyes open for places on the roads where it's obvious that the roadway is in a shaded area which may accumulate ice sooner than the open sunshine exposed areas.

Last edited by sunsprit; 09-24-2017 at 04:26 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:39 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top