U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-27-2017, 08:59 AM
 
2,243 posts, read 931,800 times
Reputation: 3677

Advertisements

I think your traction will be fine. The lack of engine power will leave you wanting for more, I think. I used to drive a 2.0L Mazda 3 FWD. It had 148hp, and maybe about the same amount of torque. It would hit some really high RPMs driving up in the mountains. It was also more difficult to pass in the high country, especially around those long but slower driving tractor trailers and RVs.

It's doable, but I think you'll find yourself at times wishing you had more. That's why I've been looking at the Ford Escape 2.0L Ecoboost. It's a turbo powered 4 cylinder engine that kicks out around 250hp and just as much torque. In its class and at its price point, it is one of the best performing vehicles I've found. The Mazda CX5 2.5L is the next one down on my list, but only around 185hp.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:03 AM
 
859 posts, read 418,720 times
Reputation: 533
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegrid View Post
I am relocating to the denver area for work and I'm wondering if the vehicle I have is adequate for the mountains or if I should consider my options. I currently own a honda hrv awd. it's great in the snow and ice, but I'm unfamiliar with how it'd perform in the rockies since it's somewhat underpowered compared to other vehicles. I'm wondering if it would be easy to climb hwy hills, etc. without being passed up. I dont plan on off roading or anything. just highway driving and the occasional trail head.

anyone have experience with the hrv or similar vehicles? I believe the hrv is comparable to the subaru impreza as far as the engine/transmission are concerned and it seems like subaru is popular in colorado. any idea how these would perform?

thanks
Just know your cars limits. I think AWD is good. You may want to have more frequent oil changes if you find yourself revving the engine more than usual, or make sure to use a good oil. Check it sometimes to make sure it's not using up oil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:05 AM
 
5,321 posts, read 2,762,557 times
Reputation: 9865
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Hepburn View Post
You'll do fine...even on passes..I do, however, tell
people when you can ,boy, will you love a 6 cyl better, next buy.

A story:
I had a little 4 cyl Toyota truck, rear wheel drive only , weight in the back, new tires, studded in the rear....Eisenhower pass was closed BIG time ...i think i kissed the ground at Frisco...the police let me through...i did fine...
I was winding my way around semi's jack knifed and small cars, sideways, completely stuck off to the sides....like a grave yard...eery...
Some cars went thru before they closed 70 behind them on the other side going West...I watched cars with NO control going downhill
banging against the concrete medians over and over....terrible sight.
Nothing much helps on sheer ice downhill!
Pls, check the forecast before you go a'hikin'!!! Charge your phone, bring water and a protein bar!
Leave nothing in your car...parking areas for hikers are notorious spots for robbers.

I know I gave too much info. I do that.
That was my experience, too. Six is a nice compromise if you frequently do light towing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:47 AM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,950 posts, read 20,207,715 times
Reputation: 22581
Your car is adequate, but you are not worthy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 10:31 AM
 
124 posts, read 139,826 times
Reputation: 135
Looked up specs on 2016 Honda HRV - maximum torque (pulling power) shows 4300 rpm. For going uphill, try downshifting to where your tachometer is in the range of 4000-4500rpm. Specs also show maximum horsepower is at 6500rpm, so 4000-4500rpm is reasonable for uphill on steep grades.


A second issue in mountain driving is downhill downshifting (use the same 4000-4500rpm as your maximum). Minimize your use of brakes. Downshift so you only use brakes intermittently (ie just to slow you by 10mph or so). Then off the brakes to let them cool. DO NOT "Ride" the brakes. Do you have any friends or neighbors that are experienced mountain drivers? It's easier to demonstration these suggestions than explain them. Hope this helps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 11:38 AM
 
2,243 posts, read 931,800 times
Reputation: 3677
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmiii View Post

A second issue in mountain driving is downhill downshifting (use the same 4000-4500rpm as your maximum). Minimize your use of brakes. Downshift so you only use brakes intermittently (ie just to slow you by 10mph or so). Then off the brakes to let them cool. DO NOT "Ride" the brakes. Do you have any friends or neighbors that are experienced mountain drivers? It's easier to demonstration these suggestions than explain them. Hope this helps.
Learned that the hard way after my first few months out here. Had warped rotors after a few trips to the mountains. Of course, it was a GM car, so that probably had some impact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 01:15 PM
 
540 posts, read 255,240 times
Reputation: 405
the vehicle is fine
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2017, 10:06 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,125,762 times
Reputation: 1845
You should be fine. When I grew up in Denver, used to make trips up to Loveland to ski in my '64 BelAir. Then front wheel drive came out and I swore I'd never own another rear-wheel car. Now I have a 4-Matic all wheel and swear I'll never own anything but AWD. Cars with rear, front, or all wheel drive should be fine. Just takes a little more "driver input". And as previously stated, stay off the brakes. Downshift, downshift!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2017, 08:10 PM
 
831 posts, read 649,426 times
Reputation: 1210
https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews...t-drive-review

Apparently it has paddle shifters, so you can actually downshift (fake gears) the CVT for ascent or descent.
Read your owner's manual and understand how your transmission works!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2017, 09:49 PM
 
11,256 posts, read 43,208,400 times
Reputation: 14905
Quote:
Originally Posted by stinkingliberal View Post
Give the car a rest after it's been working hard--so if you're driving up to Vail, stop and have a coffee after it makes it up to the Eisenhower tunnel.
LOL on this one ... once you've reached the top of the climb (East or Westbound ... to/from Vail from the Front Range) ... there's a substantial downhill where the hard working engine & transmission will cool off very quickly.

On the way to Vail, you'll be able to have several such level spots or descents after climbs ...

the climb up past Lookout Mountain to Idaho Springs has several, then the climb to Georgetown has the level spot before the climb again to the tunnel. Past the tunnel is a several mile descent to Dillon, then Officer's Gulch easy cruising to Copper Mtn. Climb up Vail Pass, crest that, and you'll have the descent down to East Vail, then the flats to Vail.

Your car can take this route in stride. Downshift as needed to keep the engine in it's working range and it will perform just fine. Keep in mind that you'll be driving at lower speeds during inclement weather months or if you're traveling with the high traffic density that happens on most weekends.

I've made this trip hundreds of times. Frequently, for years with a 60 HP 1971 MB 220D. It had "just enough" HP to make the last mile or so up the approach to the Eisenhower Tunnel at 55 mph, the posted speed limit ... if traffic was moving that fast. Many times, the trip was a lot slower than that through the area due to traffic slow 'n go. Lots of folks get out into the left hand lane and discover that they don't have the HP to go even 55 in that area ... can be frustrating for those days when you're driving a much higher HP car/truck. Or when the road conditions are slick and 55 mph is way faster than most folk can stay in control of their vehicle ... and slow down for the conditions. As well, many folk simply are intimidated by the roads up in the high country and drive much slower than the posted speed limits, even when the roads are clear.

OP, your car is quite adequate for the area's driving. All the more so if you're not commuting up to the mountain passes every week ... as some of us have done for years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:40 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top