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Old 10-29-2017, 09:41 AM
 
773 posts, read 505,879 times
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My first question is ?


Why aren't ALL of us drug addicts ? How come the vast majority of adults are smart enough to see the dead end that the drug users can't see ?


Answer.....Every generation has its fair share of fools. And there is all ways another cohort of them just around the corner. Just like the uneducated multi generational poor.......drug addicts are all ways going to be around.


XXX.
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Old 10-29-2017, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,798 posts, read 4,901,271 times
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If you are interested in learning how this opiod crisis developed, listen to this podcast:

The opioid crisis in the United States now rivals the Vietnam War in terms of how many Americans have been killed. After calling the opioid crisis a national emergency, President Trump has officially declared it a public health emergency — a distinction with a difference. We speak with a recovering addict who was 14 when he tried oxycodone for the first time. “By everyone’s standards, I should be dead,” he said about his former drug dependency. Guests: Aaron Pope, who lives outside Lexington, Ky.; Julie Hirschfeld Davis, a White House correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

https://www.nytimes.com/podcasts/the-daily?_r=0
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Old 10-29-2017, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Tyler, Texas
212 posts, read 86,755 times
Reputation: 1188
I lived in Grand Junction, Colorado from Oct. 2001 to June 2007. Now, I will say that there are wonderful people who live in Grand Junction. BUT....

Personally it was very difficult for me to live there. I used to feel helpless and hopeless sometimes staring at the Bookcliffs all the time. The zero degree humidity landscape is both beautiful and not so beautiful at the same time. I had a child in elementary school which persuaded me to stay in Colorado much longer than I wanted to. The elementary school system and the subsequent "Challenge Program" that my child attended were top notch and I can only say great things about that.

The lack of affordable housing, the prevalent slum lord crap apartment complexes and the low wage paying jobs were awful. I never felt safe living in Grand Junction. I believe the methamphetamine culture and abuse combined with generational mental illness created a subclass of people who were chronically wondering the streets with nothing to do. Even people who drove cars and had a place to live seemed to have an edgy, dark vibe to them. For a small town, it was just so prevalent. I can see why abuse of drugs and mental illness could become a breeding ground cess pool for Opioid abuse. From what I understand and what I read in the newspapers, Denver was a similar story with a closed in town surrounded by mountains. It just feels so stifling. Yes, I realize it is a beautiful paradise but Colorado was not an easy place to live in.

I was born and raised in Southern California. I am 54 yrs. old and my mother was born in 1930. During her life, she became addicted to prescribed narcotics and muscle relaxants due to a severe migraine problem she sought treatment for in the 1950's. I believe it was due to her being raised by a mother who refused to be psychologically honest. Instead my mom was verbally and emotionally abused by her mother, who also depended upon my mom financially after my mom graduated from high school. My mom married and had a daughter born in 1954. This daughter, my half sibling grew up believing as my mom did that if a doctor prescribes pills it is okay to abuse them in order to escape. This eventually led to heroin addiction when my half sibling was introduced to IV heroin abuse in the early '70's. My mom married my dad who was a hard core Barry Goldwater Republican who had nothing to do with drugs at all but drank like a fish and was hard core abusively violent. Between being emotionally and physically abused, prescribed dangerous legal narcotics and the growing financial inequity in California, both my mom and my half sibling sister never realized what hit them and why. My dad beat the crap out of my mom for which she was hospitalized and then he promptly left her for another woman when I was just 11. My mom was in no way shape or form prepared to raise me mentally or financially. I ended up left alone as a pre teen and a teenager much of the time, while my mom worked and tried to help my older sibling who was in and out of prison.

I mention all this because I saw many similarities in Colorado. Although much of the population is liberal, much strict conservatism abounds. If you could not afford decent housing, your neighborhood in Colorado like California would be a rough and dangerous place for a child or anyone to live in. When I was only 13 yrs. old, someone offered to inject heroin into my veins. If I had not had an older sibling struggling with heroin addiction, I would have accepted and become an IV heroin addict myself in 1976. I had zero support or care from my own father who did not want to be bothered by me and my mother would be passed out cold at home which is why I was not home. Ironic that the only thing that stopped me from becoming a heroin addict was that I grew up knowing full well what happens to heroin addicts. I think that in many cases, people grow up not feeling any sense of control over their lives, abusing drugs is an escape from reality. If you grow up seeing your parents work hard and not get any where economically, if you see nothing on the horizon when you look around, when you see people treat others so badly with zero respect, I think it creates a sense of hopelessness. Whenever there is a sense of hopelessness in a society, drug abuse skyrockets. By drug abuse, I mean DANGEROUS drugs. I am not talking about marijuana. To equate marijuana as a gateway drug to opioids is just ignorant in my opinion. I personally believe people choose to use dangerous, life altering drugs like opioids either to seek pain relief in narcotic form or to escape the reality of their lives. Just my opinion, and unfortunately with the landscape of Colorado being so remote and closed in geographically combined with little economic opportunities for anyone who does not possess a very high paying job it is sort of a perfect storm of sorts to create a hopeless stagnating environment.
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Old 10-29-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,905 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355
Quote:
Originally Posted by mapleguy View Post
My first question is ?


Why aren't ALL of us drug addicts ? How come the vast majority of adults are smart enough to see the dead end that the drug users can't see ?


Answer.....Every generation has its fair share of fools. And there is all ways another cohort of them just around the corner. Just like the uneducated multi generational poor.......drug addicts are all ways going to be around.


XXX.
You could write a book on the ignorance in this post.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:10 AM
 
1,314 posts, read 1,728,178 times
Reputation: 1683
Quote:
Whenever there is a sense of hopelessness in a society..
I think this is key however it originates in a person.
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Old 10-31-2017, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Colorado
897 posts, read 483,927 times
Reputation: 992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
If you are interested in learning how this opiod crisis developed, listen to this podcast:

The opioid crisis in the United States now rivals the Vietnam War in terms of how many Americans have been killed. After calling the opioid crisis a national emergency, President Trump has officially declared it a public health emergency — a distinction with a difference. We speak with a recovering addict who was 14 when he tried oxycodone for the first time. “By everyone’s standards, I should be dead,” he said about his former drug dependency. Guests: Aaron Pope, who lives outside Lexington, Ky.; Julie Hirschfeld Davis, a White House correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

https://www.nytimes.com/podcasts/the-daily?_r=0
Sad that the government and pharmaceutical companies started this problem and won’t own up to it.
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Old 11-01-2017, 12:54 PM
 
384 posts, read 214,032 times
Reputation: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
Sad that the government and pharmaceutical companies started this problem and won’t own up to it.



Yes, but we have to be responsible for our actions. I was prescribed oxycodone after a car accident and I only took one and still have the rest of the bottle. Nobody forces drugs down our throats , the same with alcohol. We are the ones that keep the pharmaceutical companies in business, not the other way around.
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Old 11-01-2017, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,905 posts, read 6,501,326 times
Reputation: 7355
Quote:
Originally Posted by little pink View Post
Yes, but we have to be responsible for our actions. I was prescribed oxycodone after a car accident and I only took one and still have the rest of the bottle. Nobody forces drugs down our throats , the same with alcohol. We are the ones that keep the pharmaceutical companies in business, not the other way around.
There’s a great article in Nat Geo this month regarding the tests on the brains of addicts. There is data that proves this is much more of a brain wiring or rewiring than it is a moral issue.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/m...-of-addiction/
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