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Old 02-26-2018, 08:24 AM
 
200 posts, read 228,628 times
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You will have to stop and catch your breath from time to time, wear sunscreen everyday, and dress warmly but living at altitude is easily adaptable. Very special scene up here. Your body will acclimate and visitors' will too. You need to drink a lot of water and moisturize often but again, if you're a mountain person, the high country is hard to beat...Leadville resident... Oh and one other thing, Breck, Blue River, north side of Hoosier pass is on the cold and shady side of the mountain. Leadville is on the sunny side. Be warned...
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Old 02-26-2018, 04:11 PM
 
1,563 posts, read 2,821,643 times
Reputation: 1997
Quote:
Originally Posted by townshend View Post
There is an Nepalese ophthalmologist who created his own manufacturing process of IOLs (= intraocular lens) -- to make the lens more affordable -- so that he could treat those dwelling at higher altitudes.

Dr. Sanduk Ruit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanduk_Ruit

Surely a hero in my book . . .
Interesting. The wikipedia article doesn't go into specifics. Questions:
Did he do ICCE, ECCE, or phaco?
Was it a one power/one size fits all IOL?
Foldable or rigid?
AC or PC?
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Old 02-26-2018, 07:30 PM
 
312 posts, read 145,934 times
Reputation: 1243
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK123 View Post
Interesting. The wikipedia article doesn't go into specifics. Questions:
Did he do ICCE, ECCE, or phaco?
Was it a one power/one size fits all IOL?
Foldable or rigid?
AC or PC?
I don't know what kind of cataract surgery he performs. Here is a link to his foundation, and you might find more information there, or even e-mail them: Home

FYI: This summer I had cataract surgery in TX. The surgeon implanted Tecnis toric symfony IOLs, which are considered "extended range of focus" lens (of course, everything has to be "marketed"). Most of the pain I experienced was in the wallet . . .
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,116,724 times
Reputation: 7503
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK123 View Post
Same thing is true of the natives in the Andes. I was on a train in Peru that stopped at a town above 14000 ft. Despite their adaptations, skin cancer is on the rise among those people.
And in my case, in Colorado too. I lived at sea level for decades, and after several years in Colorado (at "only" 5000 ft) I found out today that I have skin cancer. There is a very real hazard with combining higher elevation and very clear skies.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 03-02-2018 at 04:16 PM..
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Old 03-02-2018, 05:31 PM
 
1,563 posts, read 2,821,643 times
Reputation: 1997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
And in my case, in Colorado too. I lived at sea level for decades, and after several years in Colorado (at "only" 5000 ft) I found out today that I have skin cancer. There is a very real hazard with combining higher elevation and very clear skies.
Hence, the importance of sunscreen, hats, and sunglasses (to minimize cataract and surface changes such as pterygia).
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:44 PM
 
20,852 posts, read 39,085,412 times
Reputation: 19110
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryK123 View Post
Hence, the importance of sunscreen, hats, and sunglasses (to minimize cataract and surface changes such as pterygia).
I can't you how many times that myself and many regular posters in COLO forums have advised these steps to those visiting or moving to COLO.
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Old 03-02-2018, 08:09 PM
 
312 posts, read 145,934 times
Reputation: 1243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I can't you how many times that myself and many regular posters in COLO forums have advised these steps to those visiting or moving to COLO.
In fact, Colorado has one of the highest melanoma rates in the country, most likely due to its elevation. However that may be, it is the UV index -- not elevation per se -- that is the most important number to go by: Does Elevation Increase Risk for Skin Cancer? | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

You can actually use the EPA's SunWise UV Index app to predict the UV index at a particular place and time of day and year: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/epas...466052686?mt=8

And don't be lulled into complacency just by wearing sunscreen. Today's sunscreens do not protect skin from all types of UV damage: https://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/report.../#.WpoMCGrwaHs

Thus sunscreens are necessary, but in and of themselves, they may not be sufficient.

Probably one of the most important steps is to surveil yourself for suspicious skin lesions. A partner or a friend can check places difficult to visualize (e.g., middle of back, back of thighs,etc.).

Know your ABCD's for the characteristics of suspicious skin lesions: Assymmetry, Border irregular, Color variegated, and Diameter larger than a pencil erazor.

When in doubt, have a dermatologist look at it. And note, there are unusual or atypical looking cancerous lesions. Biopsy may be necessary -- a negative biopsy isn't a wasted biopsy, because it rules out a suspicious lesion.

And be careful about delay. My wife has a high school friend (here in Dallas) who died about five years ago, at age 62. He had a suspicious lesion cut off his leg, but it was too late -- the melanoma had metastized. And he was treated at M.D. Anderson, one of the distinguished cancer centers in the U.S.

As a surgeon I once worked for said, "when in doubt, cut it out."
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Old 03-07-2018, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,530 posts, read 10,212,895 times
Reputation: 9761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
And in my case, in Colorado too. I lived at sea level for decades, and after several years in Colorado (at "only" 5000 ft) I found out today that I have skin cancer. There is a very real hazard with combining higher elevation and very clear skies.
You and I have had our dust-ups, but I sincerely hope that as scary as it may sound your prognosis is nothing short of excellent.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:40 AM
 
312 posts, read 145,934 times
Reputation: 1243
Skin cancers generally come in three different varieties

1) basal cell carcinoma -- seriously, this is the best kind to get, if you are going to get one. Remember it this way --basal usually does NOT metastasize . . . it stays on (home) base most of the time. I had a small BCC surgical excised from my left pinna (bottom of ear). They use a method called Moh's surgery, a tissue-sparing approach for the face. They cut smaller margins, stain the sample to make sure they got it all, and if not, they will extend the cut a little more, all in one visit.

The dermatologist did a fantastic job sewing up my ear -- it was a small nodule, after all, and nobody can tell (but I just did).

2) squamous cell carcinoma -- this is more dangerous because it is likely to metastasize. Still plenty of time to catch it as a primary tumor, but watchful waiting is not a treatment strategy.

3) melanoma -- this is the bad boy, and very very dangerous. For 2018, it is estimated that there will be 91,270 case of melanoma in the U.S., with a mortality rate of 9,320: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/melano...tatistics.html

Melanoma has two growth stages: 1) horizontal -- it spread out slightly across the skin, AKA superficial spreading malignant melanoma:

https://melanomaknowmore.com/wp-cont...al-300x246.jpg

But some of them (e.g., nodular) have a quicker vertical growth phrase, where they invade the dermis (skin layer below the epidermis):
https://melanomaknowmore.com/wp-cont...ar-300x162.jpg

When these skin lesions grow horizontal, this will lead to metastasize, via the lymphatic system. This is why lymph nodes sometimes have to be excised as well.

Due diligence is the key . . . don't delay diagnosis and treatment.

Here is hoping that thoreau's case is completely curable.

Caveat emptor: the pictures are for illustrative purposes only. I suggest you view as many as you can. Remember, some skin cancers are atypical, ambiguous, confusing, so get a professional's opinion (e.g., dermatologist).

Last edited by Mike from back east; 03-08-2018 at 01:15 PM.. Reason: Fixed the horizontal / vertical mismatch.
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Old 03-09-2018, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
1,112 posts, read 543,825 times
Reputation: 1970
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
There is an old thread at Are there homes above 11,400 foot elevation in Colorado? that discusses the issue.

It would be interesting to say the least, especially the thunderstorms.

There is a reason hikers like to start early, and get down early, from high elevations.
There is also the phenomenon of electromagnetic fields making people's hair stick out when those thunderstorms come above tree level (> 11,000 feet).

Watch out for those marmots taking the back packs.

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