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Old 02-19-2018, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Colorado
8 posts, read 3,143 times
Reputation: 12

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I live in Castle Rock north of monument and my bill is $125 or $135 in summer, $90 in winter. We also pay for a reservoir being built, it is built now but that's our alternative to groundwater and aquifers which are not being replenished with all the demand on them. Water is expensive I think compared to past places.

Also, our sewer charge is determined by usage in Dec through March and is then applied to entire year.
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Old 02-19-2018, 03:10 PM
 
5,006 posts, read 6,681,120 times
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I live near Colorado Springs and my water/sewer bill is $35/month year round - but I think mine is definitely low compared to just about everyone I know.
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Old 02-19-2018, 03:56 PM
 
3,320 posts, read 915,017 times
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We lived in Ft Collins and now live in nearby Loveland. Our recent water bill shows we used 3000 gallons last month and the charge was $25.00. I do a lot of watering in the summer for my garden via drip irrigation and it is never more than $80 or so for the water portion.

You won't have any restrictions per se that I'm aware of in Fort Collins on a city lot.

If you're looking for land and plan to use well water, you need 35+acres to be able to use your water to irrigate up to 1 acre of land-called a domestic well. Otherwise, you will get an in-house use well, where you aren't allowed to use the water to irrigate gardens, yards or animals.
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:53 PM
 
4,066 posts, read 2,055,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Postal77 View Post
Considering a move, but have never lived in an area with scarce water.

Fort Collins or monument is likely where we'll move.

Is this something to be concerned about? What should i avoid?
Avoid thinking you can plant whatever you like. I had the eye-opening experience of watering a neighbor’s plants when she was away, in our old Front Range foothills home. The area was a dangerously dry fire hazard in many years. Anyway, she had a well. They later had to hire someone to drill deeper, something like 1200’!!!!

It took me TWO hours to water her plants, and some of them she confessed were real water hogs, needing daily heavy watering. Definitely not plants that would have survived without coddling. They also kept two horses. I never knew what incredible volumes of water horses drink until I took care of them for her and anothr neighbor (NEIGH-bor ).

Find out what plants survive in a fairly dry climate with seasonal temperature extremes. Or get a condo and let others take care of landscape or yard work.

Also, forget about washing your car every week. Yes, I knew someone whose BF did this. It isn’t necessary anywhere, except maybe during periods of plentiful snowfall and the concomitant MgCl2 or other salting. It isn’t yet outlawed, but do the right thing and minimize this practice.

Don’t have a swimming pool. Ever seen desert cities from the air, the ones where aquablue rectangles and bright green golf courses are everywhere? Well, those cities are sucking CO headwaters down for nothing more than a luxury. Metro towns have public swimming pools and some reservoirs allow swimming, if you want to take a dip.
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Old 02-19-2018, 10:01 PM
 
4,066 posts, read 2,055,040 times
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Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
So now I have a reason to never wash my car (just junked my 15-year-old Toyota and never washed it).

It does seem that, if water is scarce, above some basic price floor, more use should cost more, and likely people would then use less wherever possible.

My new property will have drought-tolerant local grass in the backyard for the dogs and a wildflower meadow-type in the front. I will likely need to water a lot until it gets established but am planning on having plantings that do fine on their own in the wild. My new town requires a high percentage of ground cover planting as opposed to xeriscaping, to keep the dust down.
You’ll be fine; most, if not all, plants need extra watering to get going. And most adults who have ever put plants in the ground know this.

Just be aware that a tiny percentage of a population likes to make digs about watering even though they know it is new plants. We had one neighbor like that in a “progressive” town. She darned well knew that new grass, even drought-tolerant grass like we put in, needs plenty of water in the beginning. The first year, in summer we let the new grass go dormant. The weeds proliferated despite my frequent no-poisons weeding by hand. “Established” takes more than one season.
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Old 02-19-2018, 11:22 PM
 
230 posts, read 123,351 times
Reputation: 171
Good info, thanks. Believe it or not, we can pay $50 per month or much more if we're watering plants. We've had $100 plus water bills.

We're in Florida where it rains 65 inches pretty year. The problem is with our backwards local government.
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Old 02-20-2018, 04:10 AM
 
3,320 posts, read 915,017 times
Reputation: 2022
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Avoid thinking you can plant whatever you like. I had the eye-opening experience of watering a neighbor’s plants when she was away, in our old Front Range foothills home. The area was a dangerously dry fire hazard in many years. Anyway, she had a well. They later had to hire someone to drill deeper, something like 1200’!!!!

It took me TWO hours to water her plants, and some of them she confessed were real water hogs, needing daily heavy watering. Definitely not plants that would have survived without coddling. They also kept two horses. I never knew what incredible volumes of water horses drink until I took care of them for her and anothr neighbor (NEIGH-bor ).

Find out what plants survive in a fairly dry climate with seasonal temperature extremes. Or get a condo and let others take care of landscape or yard work.

Also, forget about washing your car every week. Yes, I knew someone whose BF did this. It isn’t necessary anywhere, except maybe during periods of plentiful snowfall and the concomitant MgCl2 or other salting. It isn’t yet outlawed, but do the right thing and minimize this practice.

Don’t have a swimming pool. Ever seen desert cities from the air, the ones where aquablue rectangles and bright green golf courses are everywhere? Well, those cities are sucking CO headwaters down for nothing more than a luxury. Metro towns have public swimming pools and some reservoirs allow swimming, if you want to take a dip.
Yes, to the underlined. I've done away with all my grass except a small patch for the dog and have converted the rest into xeriscape. For arid environments such as Colorado, huge lawns simply do not make sense. Consider installing xeriscape, arid plants are gorgeous, unique, are water wise and provide resources and homes for all sorts of insects, including bees, moths and butterflies as well as winter homes for small critters in some cases.
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Old 02-20-2018, 05:08 AM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,473,188 times
Reputation: 18835
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
You’ll be fine; most, if not all, plants need extra watering to get going. And most adults who have ever put plants in the ground know this.
Just be aware that a tiny percentage of a population likes to make digs about watering even though they know it is new plants. “Established” takes more than one season.
I'm sure the landscape architect will tell me how to take care of the new plantings and when and so forth. I have never gardened and don't plan to invent my own ways at this late date!
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:03 AM
 
1,810 posts, read 1,548,966 times
Reputation: 1631
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
Reservoir water is preferable to groundwater IMO. Denver (City) has all reservoir water and is the most stable water in the Front Range. Other municipalities that have to rely on underground water face far more problems as the water table drops.
I agree, but would add that Fort Collins has a solid water plan and reserves. Denver's system is obviously a lot larger and pulls from 4 or 5 different basins. Having multiple basins gives them more options.

I wouldn't cross FC off because of water concerns, but places like Monument would make me a bit nervous.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Denver
2,976 posts, read 2,395,835 times
Reputation: 1819
Just take it easy on how much green you have in your yard and you'll be fine. A couple trees, some bushes surrounded by rock and mulch, and either no lawn or a small one, and you won't pay that much. If you try to have a lush green backyard you will get killed on water bills when they raise prices or restrict usage in a drought and even then, water alone doesn't guarantee things grow here, unlike the SW part of the country.

So long as you are ok with a xeric look, you are good. If your not, then I would think harder before deciding on CO.
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