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Old 04-26-2018, 03:09 PM
 
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Then there are areas of the U.S. that are like designated, or predominant to one race, like:

Little Saigon (Vietnamese) in Garden Grove, CA
Little Tokyo (Japanese)
China Town (Chinese)
South Central (Blacks)
East L.A. (Hispanics/Mexicans)

If we all to get along, why are there cities and section of cities like this???
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Old 04-26-2018, 06:44 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,784,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveBoating View Post
Then there are areas of the U.S. that are like designated, or predominant to one race, like:

Little Saigon (Vietnamese) in Garden Grove, CA
Little Tokyo (Japanese)
China Town (Chinese)
South Central (Blacks)
East L.A. (Hispanics/Mexicans)

If we all to get along, why are there cities and section of cities like this???
People tend to self-segregate based on income, race, language, etc. I think this tends to ameliorate over time. For example, I'm 70 years old and when I was a kid we had parts of Baltimore that were distinct by nationality. We had Polish-town, Little Italy, a Jewish area, etc. There were so many Irish Catholics that were all over but went to a set group of churches. That's all gone now. Four of the groups you list speak very distinct languages and those newcomers will mix in later, as did the speakers of Italian, German, Polish, Yiddish, etc. As the younger generations come along they will speak fluent English and will mix and match with one another, as we've seen with the earlier immigrant waves. There are always exceptions but that's the overall trends as I've witnessed them. IMO it's all good....I eat all their foods.
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:03 AM
 
5,003 posts, read 6,678,903 times
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People forget history - a lot of the examples listed above have a lot to do with racism and when those communities were being founded those folks not being welcome to live mixed with the whites or unable to afford it, etc.

For example - the history of Chinatowns -
'The story of Chinatowns started in the mid-1840s when a series of unfortunate events in China, including Britain’s Opium War victories, natural disasters and widespread famine led Chinese citizens to look to the West for opportunities for a better life. Many Chinese immigrants made their way to California. One there, they found work in gold mines and on farms, however, they were immediately met with oppression once California’s economy started to decline. Looking for a scapegoat, many people believed Chinese immigrants were pushing American workers out of their jobs because they offered cheaper labor.

The backlash against Chinese workers forced the immigrants to congregate in inner-city neighborhoods that would eventually be labeled Chinatown. Chinatown was originally intended to be an area of refuge for Chinese immigrants to acclimate to a new culture.

The initial exodus from China explains Chinatown in San Francisco, still one of the largest Chinatowns in the world, but it doesn’t explain why nearly every other major city has one as well. According to Sanjoy Mahajan, a writer for Freakonomics.com, America’s railroads, which relied heavily on Chinese labor, are the main reason large cities all have a Chinatown. The completion of the Transcontinental Railroad left some 20,000 Chinese immigrants without work.

To make matters worse, the US government and China signed the Burlingame Treaty in 1869 which encouraged even more Chinese immigrants to make the the States their home. This plan quickly backfired when in 1877 labor parties started blaming the Chinese for the continued misfortune of California’s economy. Labor party leaders called the sudden influx of Chinese the ‘Yellow Peril’ and frequently burned down Chinese-owned businesses. Even though most of the problems happened in California, the results rippled across the country in most major cities where thousands of Chinese were out of work.

The blatant racism didn’t stop there either. During the 1870s there were over 30 anti-Chinese laws put in place by state and local governments. These laws barred Chinese immigrants from testifying in court, to own property, to vote, to marry non-Chinese and to work in institutional agencies. The problem reached a climax with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 which suspended the immigration of Chinese laborers for 10 years.

The success of Chinese immigrants relied heavily on their ability to come together in these small communities where they could build their own relationships and foster economic growth in a safe environment.'
Why Does Every Major City Have a Chinatown? - Modern Notion

Once these communities become established, change of demographics may happen, but only if something motivates it, like gentrification. Immigration practices also can drive this a bit - who will take in refugees or where they can find a foothold, etc., and who won't, and people in a new place trying to find assistance with others who perhaps came from their country first, speak their language, are just familiar to them or are family. In the West, we see some racial/ethnic enclaves as a factor of settlement of history mixed with racism, economic challenges of minority classes, and immigration policy.

That all being said, this does take the thread quite a bit off topic I think and if people want to discuss the phenomenon it really probably should be moved to another more appropriate thread and forum.
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:20 AM
 
7,046 posts, read 15,984,088 times
Reputation: 4408
Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
People forget history - a lot of the examples listed above have a lot to do with racism and when those communities were being founded those folks not being welcome to live mixed with the whites or unable to afford it, etc.

For example - the history of Chinatowns -
'The story of Chinatowns started in the mid-1840s when a series of unfortunate events in China, including Britain’s Opium War victories, natural disasters and widespread famine led Chinese citizens to look to the West for opportunities for a better life. Many Chinese immigrants made their way to California. One there, they found work in gold mines and on farms, however, they were immediately met with oppression once California’s economy started to decline. Looking for a scapegoat, many people believed Chinese immigrants were pushing American workers out of their jobs because they offered cheaper labor.

The backlash against Chinese workers forced the immigrants to congregate in inner-city neighborhoods that would eventually be labeled Chinatown. Chinatown was originally intended to be an area of refuge for Chinese immigrants to acclimate to a new culture.

The initial exodus from China explains Chinatown in San Francisco, still one of the largest Chinatowns in the world, but it doesn’t explain why nearly every other major city has one as well. According to Sanjoy Mahajan, a writer for Freakonomics.com, America’s railroads, which relied heavily on Chinese labor, are the main reason large cities all have a Chinatown. The completion of the Transcontinental Railroad left some 20,000 Chinese immigrants without work.

To make matters worse, the US government and China signed the Burlingame Treaty in 1869 which encouraged even more Chinese immigrants to make the the States their home. This plan quickly backfired when in 1877 labor parties started blaming the Chinese for the continued misfortune of California’s economy. Labor party leaders called the sudden influx of Chinese the ‘Yellow Peril’ and frequently burned down Chinese-owned businesses. Even though most of the problems happened in California, the results rippled across the country in most major cities where thousands of Chinese were out of work.

The blatant racism didn’t stop there either. During the 1870s there were over 30 anti-Chinese laws put in place by state and local governments. These laws barred Chinese immigrants from testifying in court, to own property, to vote, to marry non-Chinese and to work in institutional agencies. The problem reached a climax with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 which suspended the immigration of Chinese laborers for 10 years.

The success of Chinese immigrants relied heavily on their ability to come together in these small communities where they could build their own relationships and foster economic growth in a safe environment.'
Why Does Every Major City Have a Chinatown? - Modern Notion

Once these communities become established, change of demographics may happen, but only if something motivates it, like gentrification. Immigration practices also can drive this a bit - who will take in refugees or where they can find a foothold, etc., and who won't, and people in a new place trying to find assistance with others who perhaps came from their country first, speak their language, are just familiar to them or are family. In the West, we see some racial/ethnic enclaves as a factor of settlement of history mixed with racism, economic challenges of minority classes, and immigration policy.

That all being said, this does take the thread quite a bit off topic I think and if people want to discuss the phenomenon it really probably should be moved to another more appropriate thread and forum.
I understand what you are saying about a new thread on a different forum. My reasoning about what I posted is that not everyone likes or even wants a diverse area to live in. We sure don't need it. The only ethnic foods we eat is Mexican and some Chinese. Other folks like many other types from other countries. We do not.

Another thing I'm say is that there are many areas of the U.S. that one race pretty much dominates, because other races don't necessarily want to live there. When we lived in Parker, CO, the demographics was darn near 100% White. There are areas of Colorado, and other Rocky Mountain and Plains States that are the same way. The folks who live in these areas don't mind that demographics percentage at all, then there are those that would definitely not move to an all, or almost all, White area. There are those that can't afford to live in Highlands Ranch due to the cost of housing.
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
2,927 posts, read 1,429,178 times
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For a family friendly town, I would avoid areas with a large number of transients creating rapid growth. Plus larger areas and college towns.
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ColoGuy View Post
For a family friendly town, I would avoid areas with a large number of transients creating rapid growth. Plus larger areas and college towns.
Totally agree!
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Old 04-27-2018, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,959 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
I'll also call BS and ask on what criteria do you believe Wyoming is more aligned with family values on? The Colorado I live in has plenty of close knit, multi-generational families with healthy relationships as well as a large percentage of transplanted families who love being here and now call it home. While Colorado and Wyoming both are below national averages in violent crimes impacting families, CO is several steps lower on the suicide scale than WY. Since CO has 5.6 million compared to WY's 580k, we may have more in gross numbers that are unhappy here and worse off with disintegrating families, but percentage wise we are actually better.

As far as transients, Wyoming actually has a higher percentage of these than Colorado. According to the American Community Survey done by the US Census, 48% of the Colorado born population has stayed in the state while only 42% of native born Wyoming population has stayed in their state. Sounds like percentage wise, there are more transients in WY than in CO, but again, with the sheer numbers, CO will have more. Both have large employment in energy fields. Both also have large numbers of military personnel. All of whom typically are moving through. Certainly those factors can have a huge impact on family stability, but CO's economy is a bit more diversified than WY's so we have seen less of an impact from these transient employment factors that are disruptive to stable families.
In addition to those stats, Wyoming has about as many "nones" WRT religious affiliation as Colorado (26% vs 29%). Religion in America: U.S. Religious Data, Demographics and Statistics | Pew Research Center (Click on the state to see the stats.)

Wyoming does have better school funding than CO, also a slightly higher HS graduation rate. However, HS grad rates are dependent on how the number is calculated.
Education Spending Per Student by State
https://www.edweek.org/ew/section/mu...state-and.html
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,525 posts, read 5,834,111 times
Reputation: 6819
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoGuy View Post
For a family friendly town, I would avoid areas with a large number of transients creating rapid growth. Plus larger areas and college towns.
This advice would completely eliminate the most family friendly neighborhoods in Denver. I live in the city, there are plenty of people who have moved here from out of state and we have kids riding bikes around the block all weekend. We have the best park in the city blocks away with a huge playground, a lake that you can rent paddle boats in with your kids, acres of grass that is great for flying kites, throwing the ball around, or setting up volleyball nets. We also can walk to a great kid friendly pizza place, coffee shop, and homemade ice cream store.

The idea that Mayberry is the only place that is family friendly is such a joke.
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