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Old 05-08-2018, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Colorado
659 posts, read 345,123 times
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Along the front range are there plants you can plant that after an initial period of help, can then get along with only natural precipitation? Letís skip the Yucca as Iím not really interested in that. Any experience with globe mallow?
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Old 05-08-2018, 11:11 AM
 
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There are many. Look around the natural environment and notice what grows on its own. Look up websites on native species like sand cherry, etc. Go visit the Xeriscape gardens hosted by Colorado Springs Utilities on Mesa Road just a ways past Coronado High School in the Springs, or check with the extension service out of CSU Fort Collins, etc. Look for annual plant sales hosted by local master gardener associations and get tons of advice from them and what grows best for your needs.
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Old 05-08-2018, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,094 posts, read 10,110,838 times
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I'm looking to replace some landscaping so great question!!
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Old 05-08-2018, 11:56 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,019 posts, read 16,599,642 times
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The following plants are commonly used in landscaping in the Southwest and do well with minimal supplemental watering after they are established:

Cherry Sage, Texas Sage (Salvia spp.)

Russian Thistle (Perovskia)

Chamisa/Rabbit Brush (Chrysothamnus)

Blue Spirea (Spirea)


I recommned finding a nursery that specializes in native southwestern plants.
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Old 05-08-2018, 01:31 PM
 
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Globe mallow is very invasive, but very hardy and doesn't need much, if any, supplemental water. Russian thistle is an invasive weed, which turns into the ubiquitous tumbleweed when it dies. I think ABQ convict meant Russian Sage.
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
721 posts, read 356,965 times
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When I lived in Englewood, my front yard (including the hellstrip) was all flowers and bushes. The plants that thrived in full sun on the hellstrip without water (once established):
  • Russian sage
  • Missouri evening primrose
  • Artemesia Powis Castle
  • Atlas daisy
  • Creeping thyme (between pavers)
  • Creeping juniper
  • A low-growing evergreen (not juniper)
  • Iris
  • Sedum blue spruce
  • Blue festuca grass
  • California poppies

A New Mexico locust grew, very quickly, in the back yard without water. Rosa woodsii grew under it very well. Golden currants grew in the front yard on the north side of a big blue spruce without extra water. Rosa alba semi-plena grew very well on the north side of the neighbor's house, watered with nothing but run-off from the roof. They were so tall and prickly that the neighbors who lived there could sleep with their windows open in the summer. (The roses mentioned are available from highcountryroses.com.) Virginia creeper grew really well and had beautiful fall color; silver lace vine was a good one, too. Lilacs grow well there, but can get powdery mildew.

Something I did not have success with was a buffalo grass lawn. Prairie winecups are often touted as good xeriscape plants, but they limped along in my yard in Colorado, even with water a few times a week. They grow a lot better here in Indiana where we get 42" of rain a year, but still do better with afternoon shade. In fact, quite a few plants that were regarded as "xeriscape" could live without irrigation, but wilted on hot days or didn't grow very well without a fair amount of watering.
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
3,003 posts, read 1,705,089 times
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Try this...


https://www.amazon.com/Xeriscape-Flower-Gardener-Waterwise-Mountain/dp/1555660770
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Old 05-08-2018, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Colorado
659 posts, read 345,123 times
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Thanks for all the great info. I do have some experience with xeriscape but that usually involves some irrigation. I’m looking to put some plants in parts of the yard without irrigation.

Already in that part of the yard:
Ponderosa pine
Scrub oak
Manzanita
Yucca

Last edited by DrDog; 05-08-2018 at 07:57 PM..
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Old 05-08-2018, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
721 posts, read 356,965 times
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Mountain mahogany, golden currants (the flowers smell wonderful), New Mexico locusts and wild roses like R. woodsii and R. setigera would fit in well with what you have. New Mexico locusts are especially pretty in bloom, but they have long thorns.
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Old 05-08-2018, 10:56 PM
 
Location: The analog world
15,753 posts, read 8,803,017 times
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One that has thrived in our yard without irrigation is Oregon Grape. I'd actually love to get rid of it, but it's a monster. We also have a forsythia that has done beautifully without any additional irrigation. I should mention that both are probably the same age as the house, which was built forty years ago, and I do not know what the original owner might have done to establish them, but they're really hardy today with next to no care.
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