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Old 05-16-2018, 02:38 PM
 
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Just some observations that might help you:

- There doesn't seem to be any farming south of Boulder except for boarding horses. I think this is because the proximity to the Boulder trails attracts horse people.

- Most of the farming near Boulder is either true commercial agriculture where they grow sugar beets and hay, or boutique farming on rented land from the county. Here is a link to the county ag department

- Most of the AG land tends to be North of town. Here is a farm that raises animals in that area.

- If your spouse can handle a more rural area, check out the area around Delta, Olathe, and Montrose. The farms in that area do well.
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Old 05-16-2018, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Castor0troy View Post
Hi guys
So I’m looking to move to Colorado.
Got a family with 1 kid.
Plans are to buy a 50-100 acre plot of land and do some ranching and farming.
My wife is ok with that but she wants the ranch to be close to a big city so the kid can have an urban lifestyle.

Can someone suggest cities in Colorado where I can do ranching.

Ideally I would like a place which is 10-20 mins drive to city downtown for shopping movies etc.
So basically we want a mix of both country and city life.

Our first choice was boulder but I can’t find a lot of land around boulder.

Any suggestions and is this kind of country+city lifestyle possible.?
What counts as a "city"? Ten minutes from the center won't even get you out of a city the way I think about it.

If Montrose qualifies, then yes you should be able to buy quite a bit of land plus a house and be 10-20 minutes from shopping. Probably not 100 acres, though. I know someone who bought a large house on 17 irrigated acres in that area for around $1 million. I think its about five miles to town.

Last edited by hikernut; 05-16-2018 at 06:21 PM..
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Old 05-16-2018, 08:17 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
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Consider a state further east where it rains 40+ inches per year.
Kentucky, perhaps.
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Old 05-16-2018, 09:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Consider a state further east where it rains 40+ inches per year.
Kentucky, perhaps.
Over the years I've often suggested the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia which is lush and green with towns like Charlottesville, Harrisonburg and Lexington to pick from. Far enough away from DC to avoid the over-pricing of real estate and awesome for ranching or farming or orchards.
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Old 05-17-2018, 01:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Over the years I've often suggested the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia which is lush and green with towns like Charlottesville, Harrisonburg and Lexington to pick from. Far enough away from DC to avoid the over-pricing of real estate and awesome for ranching or farming or orchards.
We are reading a lot on ranching farming around boulder and the place definitely appears unfriendly for farming.
So we are looking at other states.
Mike thanks.
Charolletsville definitely appears to be a good place and I am researching about ranching around the city.
Do you know places in Charolletsville which are good ranching areas close to the city?
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Old 05-17-2018, 01:38 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,800 posts, read 37,476,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Consider a state further east where it rains 40+ inches per year.
Kentucky, perhaps.
or west / NW (ID is very farmer friendly!)
After what seemed like an eternity (was only 28 yrs...) of Farming / Ranching in NoCO (Haxtun to Estes Park) trying to get ANYTHING to grow (endlessly watering / amending the soils...watching a 5 min hail storm decimate my labor...I 'retreated' to the PNwe_t. (I get 100+ " of 'drizzle' / yr.

Have had the most prolific gardens / orchards / wild berries... you can imagine (best to plant LATE to avoid wet / mold issues). I am free to collect all the rainwater I want / can handle, my wells are very strong and some as shallow as 80' (most are 300'). (plan to add a 20,000 gal underground rain collection tank).

The first yr I mistakenly grew sweet corn (very tough on nutrients). I had to use my 14' ladder to run the sprinkler (end of season). It is DRY for 80 days STRAIGHT (starting July 5th, just so you can wear your raingear to July 4 fireworks)

My FIL did the hydroponic thing in NoCo, he had ~ 1 acre of greenhouses and sold to King Soopers, Safeway and Albertsons. eventually the Mexico imports became too cheap to compete with, only a few of his vast greenhouses still exist. (south of Loveland) others were east, near Johnson's Corner, where VAST acres of Pie Cherries used to grow. Now... houses are growing there. A co-worker owned a Dairy Farm, that has since become 'The Farm' (hundreds of homes with a Freeway view! (and noise) off I-25, where you cross the Big Thompson River. We had such a good life, farming and ranching in Colorado in the 1960's. Most of us were GONE by 1980's

If you happen to expect a success / financially viable.
(know your market, know your crops) I don't think you can do it buying property (and selling product) in Urban No Colorado.

Best wishes. run the numbers, evaluate the options (including your exit strategy)
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Old 05-17-2018, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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An friend of mine does hobby ranching. He owns 50 acres in eastern El Paso County and leases another 100 acres in Douglas County. He moves his dozen cattle between the two areas between season and HAS to supplement the feeding for his cows. He and his wife both work full time jobs. They live off their incomes. In most years, they break even on them. Sometimes they make money, but mostly they do it because they enjoy it. It also provides a great perspective to our kids about the world outside the city, hard work, and animal maintenance.

When my folks lived in the San Luis Valley, they had 50 acres of alfalfa with some ditch rights for watering. They typically could get a couple of cuttings out it. In a really good year, maybe three. That was typically just enough for them to feed the four horses through the winter. Compared to paying for feed, it was mostly a break even proposition. As they got older and wanted to put less effort into the farming, they did have to increase the pay for feed side of the equation.

The above examples are some of the smallest examples I have of hobby ranching/farming. Most ranchers and farmers I've met in my life own thousands if not tens of thousands of acres with hundreds of head of cattle and large implements. So that really biases my perspective when someone says they want to become a rancher. In the west, you really have to be determined and dedicated to do these for a living. it certainly can be done more easily east of the 100th meridian.
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Old 05-17-2018, 10:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Castor0troy View Post
We are reading a lot on ranching farming around boulder and the place definitely appears unfriendly for farming.
So we are looking at other states.
Mike thanks.
Charolletsville definitely appears to be a good place and I am researching about ranching around the city.
Do you know places in Charolletsville which are good ranching areas close to the city?
I recommend west of C-ville, over near Staunton or Swoope, VA which is where Polyface Farm is located. If you haven't read his book then I urge you to do so; the guy (Joel Salatin) has done wonders with his land. Mostly anywhere down the Valley will be highly suitable. C-ville, as far as it is from DC, has a few who commute from there to DC on a daily basis, so going further south or west of there should be cheaper.
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Old 05-17-2018, 01:55 PM
 
21 posts, read 6,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I recommend west of C-ville, over near Staunton or Swoope, VA which is where Polyface Farm is located. If you haven't read his book then I urge you to do so; the guy (Joel Salatin) has done wonders with his land. Mostly anywhere down the Valley will be highly suitable. C-ville, as far as it is from DC, has a few who commute from there to DC on a daily basis, so going further south or west of there should be cheaper.
Wow thanks Mike.so much usesful information here.
brilliant guys.
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Old 05-18-2018, 02:40 PM
 
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Guys one thing.
A place like Charolletsville looks great for someone like me who wants to do ranching close to a big town.

Is there any similar town in the US where the winters are not cold.

I found San antonio in TX.Nice ranches 30 min drive to the main city downtown.

Can you guys pull out a list of similar towns anywhere in US but without the snow?

Thanks in advance.
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