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Old 01-10-2008, 02:22 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LRanzolin View Post
My wife and I moved from the Washington, DC area to Western Colorado. The San Juan mountains hypnotized us... they are stunningly beautiful! We wanted to move to Montrose but wound up buying a home in Delta which is about 30 minutes north (less expensive area). However we both got jobs in Montrose. After 15 months, we left. Here is what we learned about the region (Delta down to Ouray):

1 It's a tough place to make a living. Many (yes, many) people work two or more jobs and pay is terrible. Jobs are hard to find. Alot of people feel trapped because they can't afford to leave.

2 We found out that for every two that arrive one leaves. Real Estate Agents know this and are aware they might pick the listing back up in a few months.

3. They don't like newcomers, especially Californians and to a lesser degree Texans (the place is loaded with Texans). For the newcomer to make friends with a native... "foget about it"! If you do move here you will notice after a while that all your friends are newcomers like yourself.

4. Alot of drug usage and higher than normal suicide rate. As one woman once told me- "this is the most un-Christian place I have ever lived".

5. They are traffic Nazi's. I have never seen an area so obsessed with traffic violations. What am I talking about? Drive over the speed limit, or pass on the double yellow line, or run a red light and you will find out real quick (they have cell phones and they do use them).

6. They are chronic liars. I have never lived in a region where people lie so much (it's an epidemic here). Also, the stores owned by locals often have price discrepencies between what's labeled on the package and what's charged at the checkout counter- always in favor of the store (the only place we didn't have any trouble was in WalMart).

The number one lesson we learned, like many who move here, is that the reality of living in Western Colorado is quite different than the dream. My parents who are retired fell in love with it and now spend their summers there. Nothing wrong with that! As I'm now fond of saying... "it's a great place to visit but no place to live!"


I'm very sorry you had a horrible time here but let me set your whole big spill on my town straight. #1..that is totally true I work 2 jobs... good job on that one
#2. I'm sure this is also true but with as many that come you can never notice the change in people leaving... the people that leave are usually the ones that were born here.
#3 we dont like new comers such as yourself that come in with a bad attitude and think that we try to over charge people at stores ( I've never had this happen at any store)...
#4. yes, a lot of drug usage, people bring drugs here from Denver a lot... but the suicide rate is way wrong... we have one of the lowest numbers of suicide in the state.. thanks for mis-informing everyone. Also, if we are the most "un-Christian" place explain to me what we may be doing with our 26 ( I actually counted) Churches spread thoughout our horrible town?
#5 Traffic Nazi's? um, why are you passing on a double or speeding or running lights... (another reason we don't like new comers, they have no idea what the color red on a light means appearently)
#6 oh wait I must be lying about all of this beings I was born and raised here... thanks for all the information.. too bad it was mostly wrong!
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Old 01-10-2008, 02:58 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,785,875 times
Reputation: 9132
Having lived for a number of years in west-central Colorado not that long ago, and still having family there, I will comment.

Delta/Montrose can be a nice place to live IF YOU DO NOT HAVE TO RELY ON THE LOCAL ECONOMY TO MAKE YOUR LIVING!!!! I should type that twice. With the exception of housing costs (more about that in a minute), nearly everything will cost as much as it does in Colorado's metropolitan areas, but local salaries and wages are less--often a LOT less. Unless you are a "professional" (lawyer, doctor, etc.), quite often the best paying jobs in the area are government or teaching jobs. I know a number of relatively successful businesspeople in the area. To a person, they have told me that they could have made a better income in their business were it located elsewhere (they made the monetary sacrifice to stay in the area) or they have set their business up to be partially or wholly reliant on customers from outside the region. The economy is largely supported by transfer payments and pensions coming from other areas to retired people living in the region. That, and what spills over from Telluride. The rest is largely supported in the real estate and construction industries--which have a long history of widely swinging booms and busts in the area.

Real estate prices used to offset some of higher living costs and lower salaries--no more. Outsiders love to gush about how cheap real estate seems compared to California, Texas, wherever, but it's not cheap at all if you are trying to make a living in the area. The bubble may be starting to burst (it needs to)--there are a ton of foreclosures papering the walls at the Public Trustees' offices now.

Drugs and the drug trade have been a long-term problem in the area. It is located right between Aspen and Telluride and has always been a production (marijuana) and supply route for illicit drugs going into those affluent areas. Like many rural areas, meth has come on to be a problem. Gangs are also there--tagging, and property crime are growing problems.

This is not to say that it isn't a pretty area--close to some spectacular mountain country, but it is no perfect paradise--and a lot of transplants find that out the hard way. reesespieces385 is quite right about the fact that a lot of the people who move away from Montrose/Delta are natives or long-time residents. Many of them, especially young people, can find no decent employment there; many residents in their years of peak productivity wind up being underemployed, underpaid, or both; and a number of older people find that the area's somewhat limited medical facilities do not have the specialized treatments, etc. that they require.
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Old 01-10-2008, 02:59 PM
 
13,294 posts, read 25,470,882 times
Reputation: 20392
Montrose has the best nearby outta-town in the world- Ridgway and Ouray. It has grown a nice community hospital, brand-new specialized cancer center, and appears to be getting a lot of big-box stores, if that's important.
I wouldn't uproot to Montrose (or anywhere that wasn't a major metro area) without a job lined up. Actually, I did, twice, in the past, not realizing that smaller areas just don't have jobs lying around for the picking. Housing in Montrose has gotten relatively high, relatively for the wages and job situation.
A friend of mine retired from Ridgway to Montrose and finds it a very congenial place, everything accessible, decent public transportation and very friendly. But I'd be real aware of the job situation.
Good luck- it's a lovely area.
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Old 01-11-2008, 10:36 AM
 
3 posts, read 7,085 times
Reputation: 23
Default Looks like a very average community

I have researched for places to live for about 6 year now, traveled to every state from Montana down to the Mexico border and along the Pacific coast. This is in a search for the best places to retire. I'm a transplant from New Hampshire to Northern California and moved there for the job markets it presented in 1980. Grand Junction and Montrose are the most recent areas we have visited and we spend at least one week each time we make a researched visit. Some places we have visited 3 times so that we understood the , economy, mentality and different lifestyles that were present. My current job is Marketing Research. We will make a 4th visit to the Montrose area in 2008.

The thread here is revealing in that LRanzolins comments are pretty much like any small town where somone comes in, buys up land, develops it for a profit and then moves on. At a minimum it shows the concern of the community about those activities and attempts to change things to fast. The comments about;" you learn a lot of things about the locals" is also very normal. Every community across America, that desires to keep its identity, will inhibit changes that they feel will not benefit them.

The small town I was born and raised in, New Hampshire, 3.500 population, is still fighting to this day to keep its ambiance as it was. Developers, Walmart mega stores etc., etc. and it is a full time job for town or city electives who are concerned about thier community.

The more I hear about Montrose in the negative aspects, the more I like what I'm hearing. The retired contingent already living in Montrose is going to be looking at this from a very different perspective; probably don't need full time work, have spendable income, have generated some net worth from owning a home elsewhere. They want to live in a community with low crime, decent services, good schools and a competent city management that will not allow development to run out of control. Schools are mentioned because this single aspect of any community is vital and those with lousy schools usually follow poor community structure or dysfunctional town and city government with a population that is transient.

Colorado in general is a tough place to make a living! However, the trade off for what Colorado has to offer is immense. If you are young, attempting to establish your place in life it is not easy! The people I saw while visiting Montrose appeared to understand that living there required sacrifice and it was worth that effort. Each time it was a trade off for the big city lights, percieved good jobs, more money. Frequently comments about high housing prices were presented by anyone you talked to. How the city had changed, one end of town was now becoming the big city type of development, was consistently voiced.

Research into city government activities of Montrose shows that they understand the pressures coming at them. Even the retirement population shift that impacts the town as well as Colorado itself. 77 million boomers are out there and they are ALL going to do what the curent retired contingent in Montrose has done. This is going on in every small town/city in the USA. This is real , cannot be stopped but it can be managed and controlled by city government. Those cities that do this correctly will prosper and be terrific places to live for all levels of income.

Those that have chosen Montrose or Colorado in general for retirement give a great compliment to the whole state.

Question concerning Montrose. What is the "water" supply situation for this area in a long term sense? I know it is a large agricultural area from historic view but projections for the future are important.
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Old 01-11-2008, 11:20 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,785,875 times
Reputation: 9132
Quote:
Originally Posted by statistics nut View Post
I have researched for places to live for about 6 year now, traveled to every state from Montana down to the Mexico border and along the Pacific coast. This is in a search for the best places to retire. I'm a transplant from New Hampshire to Northern California and moved there for the job markets it presented in 1980. Grand Junction and Montrose are the most recent areas we have visited and we spend at least one week each time we make a researched visit. Some places we have visited 3 times so that we understood the , economy, mentality and different lifestyles that were present. My current job is Marketing Research. We will make a 4th visit to the Montrose area in 2008.

The thread here is revealing in that LRanzolins comments are pretty much like any small town where somone comes in, buys up land, develops it for a profit and then moves on. At a minimum it shows the concern of the community about those activities and attempts to change things to fast. The comments about;" you learn a lot of things about the locals" is also very normal. Every community across America, that desires to keep its identity, will inhibit changes that they feel will not benefit them.

The small town I was born and raised in, New Hampshire, 3.500 population, is still fighting to this day to keep its ambiance as it was. Developers, Walmart mega stores etc., etc. and it is a full time job for town or city electives who are concerned about thier community.

The more I hear about Montrose in the negative aspects, the more I like what I'm hearing. The retired contingent already living in Montrose is going to be looking at this from a very different perspective; probably don't need full time work, have spendable income, have generated some net worth from owning a home elsewhere. They want to live in a community with low crime, decent services, good schools and a competent city management that will not allow development to run out of control. Schools are mentioned because this single aspect of any community is vital and those with lousy schools usually follow poor community structure or dysfunctional town and city government with a population that is transient.

Colorado in general is a tough place to make a living! However, the trade off for what Colorado has to offer is immense. If you are young, attempting to establish your place in life it is not easy! The people I saw while visiting Montrose appeared to understand that living there required sacrifice and it was worth that effort. Each time it was a trade off for the big city lights, percieved good jobs, more money. Frequently comments about high housing prices were presented by anyone you talked to. How the city had changed, one end of town was now becoming the big city type of development, was consistently voiced.

Research into city government activities of Montrose shows that they understand the pressures coming at them. Even the retirement population shift that impacts the town as well as Colorado itself. 77 million boomers are out there and they are ALL going to do what the curent retired contingent in Montrose has done. This is going on in every small town/city in the USA. This is real , cannot be stopped but it can be managed and controlled by city government. Those cities that do this correctly will prosper and be terrific places to live for all levels of income.

Those that have chosen Montrose or Colorado in general for retirement give a great compliment to the whole state.

Question concerning Montrose. What is the "water" supply situation for this area in a long term sense? I know it is a large agricultural area from historic view but projections for the future are important.
First of all, growth is not being managed well (if at all) in Montrose, Delta, or anywhere else in most of rural Colorado. The planning and zoning processes (where there are any--some counties don't even have zoning) are almost wholly biased toward the developer. (I know--I worked very close to it for years.) There may be a lot of talk and wringing of hands by the political leadership over "uncontrolled growth," but the fact is virtually nothing is done to make growth sensible. The proof is on the ground--the sprawl, the destruction of downtowns for the sake of "suburbanized" shopping, and--especially--the loss of ag land to development continue unabated. The amount of ag land and open space lost to subdivisions, rural sprawl, "ranchettes," and the like is appalling--not maybe to people "transplanting" from elsewhere, but woefully apparent to anyone who has lived in or known the area for any length of time (which WAY TOO MANY transplanted johnny-come-lately posters to this forum have not).

Rural Colorado is certainly not the crime-ridden mess one finds in so many other places, but rural law enforcement in much of Colorado is struggling to keep its collective head above water. Growth is out pacing law enforcement resources--and the criminals, especially the drug dealers, know it.

As to water, the Delta/Montrose area planned better than most in that regard. Water comes from the "Project 7" system, which diverts water from the Gunnison River in the Black Canyon and carries it through the Gunnison Tunnel to the Project 7 water treatment plant east of Montrose. There is likely quite a bit of capacity there to allow for more population growth, which may be a good or bad depending on one's viewpoint.

Quote:
77 million boomers are out there and they are ALL going to do what the curent retired contingent in Montrose has done. This is going on in every small town/city in the USA.
Finally, it is purely my opinion, but I think this view is woefully optimistic. I strongly believe that a poisonous combination of resource depletion, demographics, souring of speculative investment, and oncoming structural long-term weakness in the US economy is going to make the "retirement" years of Baby Boomers (and I use the term "retirement" euphemistically--for many Baby Boomers, true retirement will cease to be a viable option, especially for those born later in the "Boom") something much different than the current cushy lifestyle enjoyed by many middle and upper-middle class retirees. I think that the current retiree lifestyle is a "bubble," just like the "dot.com bubble" and the "real estate bubble." Like them, it will deflate. Boomers (and I am one), of course, do not like to think about this, but reality will win out--as it ultimately always does.
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Old 01-21-2008, 09:39 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,677 times
Reputation: 10
I've lived in Montrose my entire life. Born here, raised here. Saying that, I know what it will be like for your kids to grow up here. There isn't much to do here for teens. Your kids still have a few years though. I'm only 20 so I'm not far from this age group. We have a skate park for skateboarding. I used to go there, but it's becoming more of a "bad scene." All my friends and I would just hang out at someones house, or drive around looking for something to do.
It seams like the drinking age continues to drop too. I remember growing up going to school hearing about my fellow classmates getting drunk and doing drugs at alarming ages.
This is just my two cents, coming from someone that's recently grown up here.
Other than that, Montrose is beautiful. The landscape, the weather. In the summer it gets hot, up to the triple digits, and winter is cold, single to negative digits. The past few years we've been getting good snow fall. Just don't ever expect your kids to ever have a snow day...
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Old 02-07-2008, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Montrose
63 posts, read 309,761 times
Reputation: 19
Default Bigkiddy..

You are right.. Small town ..nothing to do but the town is planning on a new Rec Center to help give the kids something more to do..

I have a son about your age and hm was born and raised in Montrose .. he has done quite well and is in college as a PreMed Student .. He spent most his time hitting the books,sports activities ,Music and Martial arts.
The Key was he kept busy and I knew what he was doing all the time.

Montrose is a great little Town and sure beats growing up in Los Angeles like I did!

HM
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Old 02-08-2008, 07:08 PM
 
79 posts, read 254,683 times
Reputation: 94
There is a new Teen Center being opened by the Boys & Girls Club. It could be pretty cool. Also, HS Sports seem to be a big thing here too. And of course family activities like skiing, rafting, hiking, biking, fishing.

There are 2 movie theaters with 3-4 screens each. I would like to see an new multiplex; maybe soon? There is a bowling alley. There is a Children's Museum. There is a paint-your-own-pottery place.
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Old 03-14-2008, 12:06 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 19,088,771 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post

Finally, it is purely my opinion, but I think this view is woefully optimistic. I strongly believe that a poisonous combination of resource depletion, demographics, souring of speculative investment, and oncoming structural long-term weakness in the US economy is going to make the "retirement" years of Baby Boomers (and I use the term "retirement" euphemistically--for many Baby Boomers, true retirement will cease to be a viable option, especially for those born later in the "Boom") something much different than the current cushy lifestyle enjoyed by many middle and upper-middle class retirees. I think that the current retiree lifestyle is a "bubble," just like the "dot.com bubble" and the "real estate bubble." Like them, it will deflate. Boomers (and I am one), of course, do not like to think about this, but reality will win out--as it ultimately always does.
Yes, I have to reluctantly agree. The whole notion of "retirement" is fairly recent for the working class. In years not so far past people worked until they could no longer work and then relied on family to support them in old age (if they had that comfort). Our current "standard of living" is unsustainable and soon to decrease almost certainly. Retirement will not be golden for my generation and will be closer to brass for the next. There is no "entitlement" to a comfortable retirement. In perspect, my father was walking out the door headed for work at 76 when he had the stroke that put him into retirement. He had worked from the age of 11 and his retirement was 5 years in a wheelchair. There but for fortune...
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Old 03-14-2008, 01:38 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 4,937,318 times
Reputation: 6677
Don't worry Jazz....you'll get what you were promised.

Of course the dollar will be worth so little that the thousand or two that you get won't be enough to pay your gas bill...
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