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Old 07-14-2018, 10:36 AM
 
51 posts, read 13,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COcheesehead View Post
Your list is challenging because of the school requirement. Everything else is found in many places, but Colorado has a tendency to underspend on schools. I would also caution your temperament towards politics. Colorado is a purple state. You'll run into both lefties and righties and we all seem to get along. Just don't come into the state with preconceived notions about certain towns. Boulder isn't all liberal and Colorado Springs isn't all conservative.
+1. No one moves to Colorado for the schools.
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Old 07-14-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,459 posts, read 4,499,205 times
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Try Manitou first:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ma....8950929?hl=en

This area has legal retail cannabis and fewer Trumpers.
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Old 07-14-2018, 10:21 PM
 
Location: The 719
13,792 posts, read 21,720,028 times
Reputation: 13396
If you're loaded down with cash, Crested Butte is very nice, and liberal as a coastal city.









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Old 07-15-2018, 02:46 PM
 
446 posts, read 535,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brianz72 View Post
1) We want a metro area of 25-50,000+, whether in the town or clustered with other nearby, easily accessible towns/cities.

2) We want as relaxed marijuana laws as possible. Recreational dispensaries are a must, in town or in a neighboring town less than a half hour away.

3) Outdoor rec is key - we want easy access to mountain biking and hiking trails. We don’t ski though. Some things are just too scary to start at age 45... periodic bike crashes are enough for me.

4) We want a place where people are nice, welcoming, tolerant, not church-obsessed, and NOT rural/Trumpy/right wing/religious. I am not looking to debate anything with anybody. This is just our preference.

5) Our 10 year old daughter is in “gifted” programs so we need a good school system for her.

6) We want a town that’s growing with a diversifying economic base and well-educated, reasonably successful/affluent people. Not elitist or exclusionary. A local large university always helps.

Professionally I’m in a position where I want to purchase a $500,000 house with all cash and then figure out the rest. I’d like to try something entrepreneurial after being a well-paid but demoralized corporate slave for 20 years. I’m leaning toward launching a cannabis oriented business (I’m already well-connected and invested in some for a few years) or just buying a fun local business of any kind and running it. I can be a photographer too. That’s why I want a growing/booming city with a diversified economic base.

We are leaning heavily against Denver/Boulder since it’s just way too big and pricey now. We’ve also ruled out Colorado Springs for social compatibility reasons. We’re intrigued by Fort Collins and Grand Junction but haven’t visited. Any thoughts? Thanks all!!
Counties (aka, Metro Areas) inbetween 25,000 and 60,000:

Garfield (Glenwood Springs)
Eagle (Eagle)
La Plata (Durango)
Fremont (Canon City)
Montrose (Montrose)
Delta (Delta)
Morgan (Fort Morgan)
Summit (Breckenridge)
Montezuma (Cortez)

Of that list, only Durango could possibly be considered to have a diverse/affluent economic base. Everything else is dominated by one or two industries. The liberal areas are very expensive, tourist-based economies, of which Glenwood Springs is probably the cheapest. The cheaper areas are rural and 'Trumpy'. If you eliminate the size requirement, Grand Junction and Colorado Springs might work. Also, the size requirement is going to make gifted-student education access much more difficult as small schools often don't have the resources for specialized education options.

If I were you, I would seriously consider Washington or Oregon, especially the eastern parts of the states. A lot of mountains and mountain-biking with the same weed-friendly regulations. The smaller towns are going to be conservative - as everywhere else in America - but generally the whole attitude of people is more live-and-let-live the farther north and west you go in the US. Economy in areas like the Gorge or the Inland Northwest is going to be more diverse (if not truly big-city diverse) than rural/west slope Colorado. Not totally sure about Oregon, but Washington has decent schools and if your daughter is above average, Washington's Running Start program may interest you.
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Old 07-17-2018, 06:42 PM
 
3,641 posts, read 1,018,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xeric View Post
Fort Collins has a very good public school system (I raised a child here and my understanding is that it hasnít declined in quality since then). IMO, it is liberal now but not to the level of Denver or Boulder. Larimer County, however, is more centrist and even Republican-leaning to some extent. City size is bigger than you would like (approx. 150,000) and it is only going to grow larger.

I think for me, the quality of life here is inversely proprortional to how much of your regular needs involve travel to the large metro area to the south (and I say that as someone who really likes Denver proper). If you only go down there for the occasional excursion but your daily like is mostly self-contained in FC (my circumstances) the high growth rate and size of the city shouldnít be a problem. If you already have $500,000 to spend on housing you wonít have a problem on that front either.

Iím not sure about entrepreneurial activities. I do suspect youíd be better off closer to the many small cities south of here and the Denver metro area but I donít really know.
I would look at Fort Collins, which will fit all your criteria except it will be over your population mark. But, any town/city in Colorado that fits the bill will be over 50,000. Fort Collins doesn't feel as large as it is however.

Moreover, you will get in Larimer County, a mix of about 33 Democrat, Republican and independent. If you look at the old town area, not only of Fort Collins, but also Loveland or Longmont, most of the inhabitants are much more on the liberal side.

Narrow it down to 3- 4 cities and do a trip to check each out.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:20 PM
 
56 posts, read 78,018 times
Reputation: 99
I have to agree with you. I've lived here over 40years, having moved from the south. I still sound like I just got off the boat for some reason (so does my sister who lives in Fort Collins). But I don't see that chill from people at all really, even though half the people in the US think southerners are stupid. And it IS diverse because half the people in Colorado came from somewhere else.

There are small towns and rural areas where the western lifestyle (they aren't just dressing up) is prevalent. Those places are pretty small and may not seem comfortable and welcoming because the lifestyle, interests, way of speaking....everything is different. So they aren't being mean. They just aren't that interested.

Once when my former husband and I bought a ranch off highway 287, north of Fort Collins, almost on the Wyoming border, we wanted to play cowboy (now we sort of WERE dressing up lol) The cowboys and ranchers took us in like we were family, mentoring us through our efforts, inviting us to all the work days and roundups. Fabulous teachers for interested students. We never felt unloved. Perhaps because they sensed a real interest and respect from us. Anyway...it was the adventure of a lifetime.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:41 PM
 
56 posts, read 78,018 times
Reputation: 99
Boulder is a great town to go for shopping and dining, but lots of old needles and people poop all over (in my opinion). I've stayed there many times for concerts or something, but all along the creek and trails...ick. I know they're trying to work on that. Give the people bathrooms. By your serene nature path.ha ha
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:57 PM
 
56 posts, read 78,018 times
Reputation: 99
Default Second Look at Co Springs

That was an excellent recap of Colorado Springs, and so interesting to me. I'm selling my house in Silverthorne this summer and moving. Within Colorado. I'll probably be here forever. I've lived here 40 years and love Colorado like a religion. But it's about the natural world of nature, not the people or stores etc.

I've been considering Canon because I know it...having lived in Westcliffe a decade. The art scene there is picking up, and it's getting cleaned up and cute. But I'm not sold yet. I had thought of the Springs but probably did buy into all the stereotype critiques you mentioned from people who don't live there.

Your post made me blink hard! I'm going to take a deeper look at Colorado Springs.
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Old 11-06-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Back to Colorado in 2019
7,092 posts, read 16,146,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anyam22 View Post
That was an excellent recap of Colorado Springs, and so interesting to me. I'm selling my house in Silverthorne this summer and moving. Within Colorado. I'll probably be here forever. I've lived here 40 years and love Colorado like a religion. But it's about the natural world of nature, not the people or stores etc.

I've been considering Canon because I know it...having lived in Westcliffe a decade. The art scene there is picking up, and it's getting cleaned up and cute. But I'm not sold yet. I had thought of the Springs but probably did buy into all the stereotype critiques you mentioned from people who don't live there.

Your post made me blink hard! I'm going to take a deeper look at Colorado Springs.
That is (in red above) one of the things that is drawing us back to Colorado. The other things I have mentioned in a previous post, like: the rodeo action, freshwater lakes and, without a doubt, the wildlife in RMNP. My wife has REALLY missed seeing elk and going into RMNP for the "rut". Have some terrific photos we took of both. Also miss the White Tails and Mule deer.

Because of my past membership in PRCA, as a Team Roper, wife and I had no problem at all "fitting in" with the rodeo family there, when we lived there before. The clothes we wear and the knowledge we still have of all of the events.
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Old 11-12-2018, 07:53 PM
 
121 posts, read 28,843 times
Reputation: 349
Durango. It has Fort Lewis College, a tourist based economy (with the Silverton train), and is surrounded by mountains with lots of recreational opportunities.
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