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Old 07-26-2018, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,320 posts, read 4,350,986 times
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Colorado faces a staggering shortage that’s only getting “scarier”

https://www.csindy.com/coloradosprin...t?oid=13995176

"By 2025, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Colorado’s demand could exceed supply by 12,900 positions.

In the Colorado Springs metro area alone, there were 938 open positions with “nurse” or “nursing” in the job title on July 18, according to data supplied by the Pikes Peak Workforce Center. A good portion of those are openings at Children’s Hospital Colorado, which announced July 16 that it’s recruiting the first of 200 team members it plans to hire at its new facility in Colorado Springs. And all of the clinical nursing positions available at the Children’s Hospital require at least a four-year degree."



Healthcare is one area of the economy that keeps growing. All my children are employed in that sector. They all have excellent jobs.
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:32 AM
 
5,003 posts, read 6,681,120 times
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This is one reason why a bill was passed this year to allow 4-year nursing programs at some of the community colleges.
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Old 07-26-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
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Saw on tv Mesa State in Junction is offering a two year nursing degree, limited to 20 students.
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Old 07-26-2018, 12:14 PM
 
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Here's an article about it PPCC Expands Its Top-Ranked Nursing Program with Planned BSN Degree - PPCC Paper
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Old 07-26-2018, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
Wow, that is a really smart move. Thanks for sharing that!
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Old 07-26-2018, 01:30 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,473,188 times
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I think the requirement for a BSN instead of a 2-year ADN or diploma is related to being awarded a magnet of excellence status (or something like that).

When I went to RN school in 1979, there was the ongoing talk of a 4-year degree being a required entry-level credential. (Note that all RN credentialing involves the same licensing exam and graduation from an accredited RN program). At that time, some 80 percent of in-facility jobs didn't call for a BSN. I wondered, who is going to go to a four-year school to work nights in a nursing home, etc?

Answer, if a facility requires BSNs for non-management jobs and will not accept years of experience in lieu of... there will be shortages. Where I was back East, there were many programs, BSN, Associate's, even a few hospital programs were still open. My hospital got a never-ending flood of new grad BSNs (who do seem to lack hands-on clinical skills and were very young. Also many or most were headed for nurse practitioner credential and jobs with very little experience.

I guess you could say I don't overly endorse a BSN requirement. And there is certainly a shortage of BSNs for every clinical job in most places.
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:36 PM
 
647 posts, read 340,114 times
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It may be difficult to fill positions as pay is not great here. This is probably due to limited competition.
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:37 PM
 
647 posts, read 340,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I think the requirement for a BSN instead of a 2-year ADN or diploma is related to being awarded a magnet of excellence status (or something like that).

When I went to RN school in 1979, there was the ongoing talk of a 4-year degree being a required entry-level credential. (Note that all RN credentialing involves the same licensing exam and graduation from an accredited RN program). At that time, some 80 percent of in-facility jobs didn't call for a BSN. I wondered, who is going to go to a four-year school to work nights in a nursing home, etc?

Answer, if a facility requires BSNs for non-management jobs and will not accept years of experience in lieu of... there will be shortages. Where I was back East, there were many programs, BSN, Associate's, even a few hospital programs were still open. My hospital got a never-ending flood of new grad BSNs (who do seem to lack hands-on clinical skills and were very young. Also many or most were headed for nurse practitioner credential and jobs with very little experience.

I guess you could say I don't overly endorse a BSN requirement. And there is certainly a shortage of BSNs for every clinical job in most places.
BSN has become the new standard in most western states.
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:39 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,473,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
BSN has become the new standard in most western states.
Yes, as in most places. But there's no good reason for it except maybe the magnet status.
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Old 07-27-2018, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,795,031 times
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Now that I am retired from nursing, I can speak more freely about nursing education.

I started my nursing classes at the University of Pittsburgh 50 years ago this fall! At the time, there was a raging debate in nursing circles about the state of nursing education. Up until about that time, most nursing education was done in hospital run schools of nursing. These programs were generally 3 year, full time year round programs run by the hospitals that awarded a diploma in nursing. They were heavy on clinical service. The graduates were then eligible to take the state board exams to become an RN. Very thumbnail sketch. The closest analogy I can think of is electrician's education.

In 1964, 54 years ago now, the American Nurses Association recommended that the entry into practice education be a BSN. For these 54 years this has been debated. After that, BSN programs grew by leaps and bounds, and hospital programs began closing rapidly. I believe around the time I graduated (1970) the ratio was about 1/3 BSN and 2/3 diploma programs.

Interestingly, by the time I was in school, some of the diploma programs were shortening their programs of study to 2 1/2 or even 2 years, and cutting out some of the clinical practice. The political upheaval of the late 60s even hit nursing education, students were complaining that they were putting in hours of service to their hospital, basically as replacement for paid staff. Of course, one of the criticisms about the BSN programs was they they didn't require enough clinical experience. I disagree with this. I feel we had adequate experience to perform safely, efficiently, etc.

As the hospital programs closed, a new type of program, the ADN (Associate Degree in Nursing, or AAS in nursing) began. It was two academic years, that is much shorter than either a diploma program or a BSN, with less time for everything, classroom and clinical practice. I think the BSN should be the entry into practice. There is lots of research to support that BSN nurses are better prepared.
http://home.nwciowa.edu/publicdownlo...20Required.pdf

Sorry for the rant. I'll get off my soapbox.

ETA: Currently the ratio of BSN to AAS is about 50/50 here in Colorado. There are no diploma schools here and there have not been any for at least 40 years. St. Joseph's, one of the big ones, graduated its last class in 1969.
https://www.sjchs.org/nursing/st-jos...ursing-history

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 07-27-2018 at 09:46 AM..
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