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Old 08-16-2018, 02:35 PM
 
424 posts, read 176,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmcass View Post
Does Grand Junction tend to be more politically and socially conservative than other areas of Colorado?
Its a college town, so you'll get a mix. I would say it leans right, but its doesn't feel one way or the other.
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Old 08-17-2018, 06:55 AM
 
8 posts, read 3,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW Crow View Post
In an earlier post I wanted to come on strong about shaking off commentary one may encounter for not having kids but it may have been too sharply worded. It wasn't meant as a personal criticism.
I did not take it as criticism, just good advice to remember to be ok with who and where I am. Thank you. We’re good.
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Old 08-17-2018, 07:01 AM
 
8 posts, read 3,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gree View Post
So much of the new housing construction in Colorado is what I call "California Style"; that is, large houses on small lots, row upon row upon row. And it is like California in that most people do not know who their neighbors are. We have lived in northeast Colorado Springs for 11 years in the same house in one of these subdivisions. Everyone keeps to themselves. Sure, we wave to the neighbors and say hi when we see them, but that is about it. So if you choose to remain childless, I do not think many of your neighbors will know, and if they know, they will not care. You will not be "left out" of anything, because there is nothing to be left out of. If you buy in an older, well establish neighborhood, think big trees, it might be different, but I kind of doubt it.
Great info. Thank you.
I was thinking of community events, too. Tallahassee, for example, has a lot of events, but they’re very much for kids and their parents...or lots of money. So we’re just normal folks stuck in the middle, which gets old. We’re fine doing our own thing, but it’s be nice to be able to attend a few events and meet folks with similar interests. But as I’m writing that, it sounds like I’m getting into a whole different topic of conversation. 😉
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Old 08-17-2018, 07:03 AM
 
8 posts, read 3,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COcheesehead View Post
Neighborhoods are what you make them. We had Friday night pot luck dinners, wine clubs, book clubs, we went out to dinner with our neighbors. Not all Colorado neighborhoods are as cold as yours sounds. Shake it up a bit. Make it happen. We are childless as well. Never was an issue.
Excellent point! Sounds like a great neighborhood. Do you mind me asking where you guys are? Thanks.
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Old 08-17-2018, 11:17 AM
 
424 posts, read 176,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smittyrs View Post
Excellent point! Sounds like a great neighborhood. Do you mind me asking where you guys are? Thanks.
We had these neighborhood experiences in Highlands Ranch and also when we lived in Park Hill, in the city.
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Old 08-17-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
2,668 posts, read 1,666,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gree View Post
So much of the new housing construction in Colorado is what I call "California Style"; that is, large houses on small lots, row upon row upon row. And it is like California in that most people do not know who their neighbors are. We have lived in northeast Colorado Springs for 11 years in the same house in one of these subdivisions. Everyone keeps to themselves. Sure, we wave to the neighbors and say hi when we see them, but that is about it. So if you choose to remain childless, I do not think many of your neighbors will know, and if they know, they will not care. You will not be "left out" of anything, because there is nothing to be left out of. If you buy in an older, well establish neighborhood, think big trees, it might be different, but I kind of doubt it.
I live in one of those neighborhoods with big trees and it is great. I know all the neighbors within a couple block radius and regularly hang out with several of them. Even the rentals in my 'hood tend to stay occupied by the same people for many years at a time.
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Old 08-17-2018, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
575 posts, read 668,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
I live in one of those neighborhoods with big trees and it is great. I know all the neighbors within a couple block radius and regularly hang out with several of them. Even the rentals in my 'hood tend to stay occupied by the same people for many years at a time.
It’s the same in my neighborhood, which is in the Co Spgs historic central core. We know most of the neighbors in a several block radius and several are friends. People here walk around the neighborhood a lot, ride their bikes, hang out on their porches, have block parties and bbqs, look after each other. It’s a good mix of families, couples without kids, some singles, some retirees.

Prior to moving to the downtown area we lived in the north part of town in a predominantly young family neighborhood. We don’t have kids and although I never felt judged we definitely shared less common interests with our neighbors just by virtue of the fact that they were very busy with sports, and school activities and that was not our life.

We definitely didn’t see our neighbors as much up north other than the kids playing. Most people would come home and park in the garage and you would not see them again. It was more of a wave at your neighbors from the car versus sit and share a drink on the porch vibe.
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Old 08-17-2018, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
898 posts, read 405,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smittyrs View Post
I used to live in Thornton, CO back in late 90s and early 2000s. I loved and and always wanted to go back. My fiancé (53) and I (43) are planning on moving with our two labs out of Tallahassee. The heat, humidity, “Southern” mentality (chauvinism, racism and being looked at with pity or weird because I never had nor will have kids), and lack of job opportunities and pay for me - I’m in digital marketing - have worn on us too much.

So that’s why we’re leaving. I loved CO back when I lived there because of the level of intelligence, opportunity for career growth, the lack of humidity, stunning mountains and so much to do - culturally, outdoors and dinning - between Boulder, Denver and the mountains. My fiancé has gone to CO at least once a year to hunt elk or deer. We both are passionate about the outdoors - hiking, camping, kayaking, anything. We also enjoy going out for dinner once a week and love sports bars and football season.

It seems that in Co, Denver has the best opportunities for work for me, but I’m not getting any bites (I have been told a lot of companies drop anyone out of state immediately, but I’ve also been told my 18 years of marketing experience here in Tallahassee is not in the same caliber as Denver). My fiancé works with Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission as a management planner (how public land is used, preserved, etc). We’ve decided I will be the first to look for work since it may not be in Denver - could be Fort Collins or Co Springs...or Salt Lake City!

After reading more about the crazy cost of living in Denver, though, we started to look into Salt Lake City, UT. I’m nervous about the things I’ve read about so much focus on families (which gets annoying here - that things are either for families, young singles with money or retirees with money - and that’s about it). Im a little concerned about the religion (because we are not religious), but have read enough to feel ok about that.

My fiancé owns the house we’re in, so our thought is that we would move, rent for a while (year?) to get settled and then be able to put a nice amount down on a home. We’ve been quite comfortable in our 3-bed 2- bath - using one room for storage and never using the second bath.
I’ve got a good chunk of debt I’ve been working down and would hate to move and just be paying rent and debt with no room to save for a house or have money to play (dining out, exploring, whatever).

We would be comfortable renting a house to start since we have two labs and really want/need a fenced back yard (we have two acres of lush land here). We’d prefer not to have to pay more than $1500 - shoot, we’d prefer no more than $1000, but could be ok with $1700. Again, we’d hate to spend so much renting before buying. When we do buy, we are looking at about $300,000, 3 bed/ 2 bath or even 2 bed / 1.5 bath and storage space like a basement.

I’m concerned about moving into a family oriented neighborhood and be “left out” because we don’t have kids. I honestly really don’t feel like having a bunch of kids running around, either. On the other hand, I’m reading about neighborhood for young professionals and am afraid we’re a little past our prime for that category, too.
Any suggestions about how to get my resume “Denver-worthy”, what neighborhoods we should be looking at to rent and perhaps any other places in Colorado to search besides Denver area? Do you think Salt Lake City would be a wiser move for the cost of living?
Thank you for reading all of this and for your suggestions!
I loved Colorado and lived there in the late 90s. I too was forced to move to FL. The job market for engineers crashed in 2002. The only job I could find was in Florida. I remember seeing Longs Peak fade over the horizon as I drove eat to Kansas on I-70 on my way to FL. It was depressing.

I have since moved back to AZ. I am a software engineer. The problem with marketing is that it has gone the way of data mining - business intelligence, big data, predictive analytics, etc. A business usually has a point-of-sale with a large, multi-network database behind the web page and onsite sales. These databases aggregate to form data warehouses. This becomes the source of "data mining" for the automated form of marketing merged with database reporting.

To be a "marketer" in modern Denver you would likely be best off getting another degree in business intelligence and learn how to use a database. The emphasis should be on "FACTS" tables, dimensions, slowly changing attibutes, and data warehousing. Many modern business departments at universities now offer a degree in business intelligence.

That is the "cold reality" of Denver and the IT job market in general - if it can be automated or semi-automated with software, then the "old school, non-technical business majors" are left out. This has also happened in software testing, manufacturing, etc. My company recently laid off mid-level managers with decades of experience who were considered non-technical. You should see that movie "Office Space" - it was wildly popular at my old job in Denver around the time of the dotcom bust. I was doing construction labor when that happened. I went from being a senior manager making a huge amount to entry-level pay as a construction labor worker. It was like that scene at the end of the movie when the character is just working construction cleanup and finds that red stapler.

The job market is cruel in Colorado. When it crashed in 2002 it was horrible. A few openings would get thousands of applicants. I have never forgotten that and continued to upgrade my skills per decade since. Right now, I am very proficient with data warehousing and python.

If you want to move back to Colorado, you would have to combine your marketing experience with data warehousing and business intelligence (in my opinion). Best wishes.

MS in Business Analytics | Business School | University of Colorado Denver
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Old 08-18-2018, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,526 posts, read 5,834,111 times
Reputation: 6824
Please don’t listen to the guy above about his “reality of the Colorado job market”. He left here in the early 2000s and keeps assuming that nothing has changed. No city in the country is the same as it was 15 years ago, least of all Denver.
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Old 08-19-2018, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,776,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmcass View Post
Have you considered the Western Slopes; more specifically, Grand Junction? I'm in a similar boat in that I'm looking to relocate to Colorado, and I'm somewhat concerned about the rising cost of living in the Denver area.
Just checked the GJ unemployment rate, the most recent I could find was June at 3.7%. That's a little higher than Denver, but not bad. However, there are far fewer jobs out there, numerically. Probably not the best place to focus a job search. By all means, include it in your options.
https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/GRAN308URN

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
I live in one of those neighborhoods with big trees and it is great. I know all the neighbors within a couple block radius and regularly hang out with several of them. Even the rentals in my 'hood tend to stay occupied by the same people for many years at a time.
That describes my neighborhood to, including the situation with the renters.

OP, you might find a 'hood with fewer kids if you look into areas with older homes, where the original homeowners' kids are grown. Of course, then you get older neighbors, too.
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