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Old 11-27-2018, 01:36 PM
 
393 posts, read 188,021 times
Reputation: 619

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
This. A friend' daughter has 5 years of teaching experience and a master's degree. She recently moved to a small rural town mentioned where she makes $32k a year. It's no secret why rural areas can't keep teachers.
Hard to believe people go into teaching not knowing the salary.

I see this quite a bit- people go into teaching and then complain they do not make a lot and sometimes they even go on strike demanding higher pay after they have just been hired.

Wish it worked like that in the real world- I'd love to take a job knowing what it pays then see the look on the boss' face when I demand more money for the job they hired me for.
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Old 11-27-2018, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
4,666 posts, read 9,215,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Hard to believe people go into teaching not knowing the salary.

I see this quite a bit- people go into teaching and then complain they do not make a lot and sometimes they even go on strike demanding higher pay after they have just been hired.

Wish it worked like that in the real world- I'd love to take a job knowing what it pays then see the look on the boss' face when I demand more money for the job they hired me for.
You are being a bit harsh. Salaries vary by school district, so no way of knowing in advance what kind of salary any teacher is going to get. My husband was a teacher for many years in a well-funded school district, and he still paid for a lot of stuff out of his own pocket. At least being part of PERA helped with our retirement.
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Old 11-27-2018, 02:04 PM
 
1,869 posts, read 1,602,203 times
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OP- I'd start with the list of average teacher salaries for each district and look for ones that you like the area and pay. Mesa County, which is where Grand Junction is, even posts the salary schedule for incoming teachers.
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Old 11-27-2018, 03:01 PM
 
809 posts, read 1,186,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
You can avoid I-70 and still live on the Front Range - Colorado Springs, Pueblo, etc.

How big of a city do you want to live in? What amenities are must haves? Do you still need mountains? What can you afford?
Echo this. My spouse and I generally fit the demographic described here when we left Denver for CO Springs 15 or so years ago, for the EXACT reasons described (traffic, congestion, traffic, I-70, etc.). It is perfectly possible for a political conservative to live in Boulder and still enjoy life and likewise there are 200K+ left-leaning folks in El Paso County. The great benefit is LESS TRAFFIC. We go to Salida and Taos and basically never ever use I70 or go north to Denver unless absolutely necessary. There is still enough of an economy in a city of 600K+ that jobs vs. home price are more balanced than either Denver or small mountain towns. Nothing is perfect but "south" on the front range is definitely an option that avoids much of the congestion up north.
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Old 11-27-2018, 03:46 PM
 
393 posts, read 188,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreaming of Hawaii View Post
You are being a bit harsh. Salaries vary by school district, so no way of knowing in advance what kind of salary any teacher is going to get. My husband was a teacher for many years in a well-funded school district, and he still paid for a lot of stuff out of his own pocket. At least being part of PERA helped with our retirement.
Did not mean to be a Debbie Downer or harsh but if that is the way school districts work that is ridiculous.

They don't tell you the base salaries and just say "Come on board- we can not tell you what you will make but take our word for it it will be a nice salary"?

(I'd be skeptical)
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Old 11-27-2018, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Land of the Caddo and Tonkawa
4,031 posts, read 1,579,679 times
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Broaden your options by looking out of state. Don't let fear and unfamiliarity hold you back. Otherwise, you'll be stuck compromising and never be satisfied. CO isn't everything for everyone.
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Old 11-27-2018, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Na'alehu Hawaii/Buena Vista Colorado
4,666 posts, read 9,215,653 times
Reputation: 4579
Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Did not mean to be a Debbie Downer or harsh but if that is the way school districts work that is ridiculous.

They don't tell you the base salaries and just say "Come on board- we can not tell you what you will make but take our word for it it will be a nice salary"?

(I'd be skeptical)
Sorry, I guess I misunderstood your post. You said "hard to believe people go into teaching not knowing the salary". I thought you were talking generally rather than specific. Of course, anyone looking for any kind of job needs to research what your employer will pay. However, it seems that teaching salaries vary widely depending on the district. When I was working as a city planner, salaries even from state to state were much more similar to each other.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:40 PM
 
19 posts, read 28,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Hard to believe people go into teaching not knowing the salary.

I see this quite a bit- people go into teaching and then complain they do not make a lot and sometimes they even go on strike demanding higher pay after they have just been hired.

Wish it worked like that in the real world- I'd love to take a job knowing what it pays then see the look on the boss' face when I demand more money for the job they hired me for.
Rant commencing in 3, 2, 1 ... I certainly did not go into teaching for the MONEY, nor has any other teacher I have ever met. I think teachers complain about low wages because as a career we are at the bottom rung of the ladder, with little chance for upward movement. Colorado is 31st in teacher pay nationwide, and the salaries are not nearly commensurate with the ever inflating cost of living (we rank 48th for housing affordability nationwide). As a state, our high school graduation rate is ranked 46th. Clearly we are doing something wrong here. Even if I had a Ph.D. and 30 years of experience in my current district I would top out at less than 6 figures. Teachers are entrusted with educating the future of our country, so you'd think a living wage and some respect wouldn't be too much to ask for. I've spent huge amounts of $$$ on my classroom out of my own pocket for books and supplies, and I've worked in several Title 1 and affluent schools. This is one reason I have considered Montana or even Wyoming- teacher salaries there START at what I would be making in another ten years here, at least. And I am in one of the "better" districts. I derive a great deal of personal satisfaction from my job, knowing that I am making a difference, but the 60 hour weeks and incredible stress and workload for **** pay is getting old. Burnout and mental breakdowns are ever looming. It's a running joke that teachers become alcoholics, but it's so very real. There is a reason why so many good people leave the profession within the first 5 years, and I may join their ranks soon, especially if we stay in Colorado. There will be a serious shortage of decent teachers in the near future...

Okay, sorry for the rant!!! Thank you, everyone, for your thoughtful suggestions. We haven't spent much time in most of these places, save Durango, so we will have to do some serious scouting. I do like the idea of the four corners area if we could afford it. I love the desert, but I would still want to access the mountains and trees. While it is my pipe dream to live off the grid someday, I am a realist and understand that we cannot be so isolated that we can't get the kids to soccer practice or buy groceries etc.

I think the springs would still be too big and busy for me, and I'd like to be on the western slope. The airport issue just sucks but it's unavoidable I suppose. Anyone know much about Hotchkiss or Delta? Or is Montrose just the better choice in that area?

When I mention a downtown area or main street I am thinking of a town that just has some character. I love how vibrant downtown Longmont has become since we have lived here (even though it is certainly gentrifying). In my opinion, it contrasts to some of the FR sprawl- "burbs without urbs"- that consists of cookie-cutter housing developments and strip malls.
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Old 11-27-2018, 07:50 PM
 
5,045 posts, read 6,778,144 times
Reputation: 4597
Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Did not mean to be a Debbie Downer or harsh but if that is the way school districts work that is ridiculous.

They don't tell you the base salaries and just say "Come on board- we can not tell you what you will make but take our word for it it will be a nice salary"?

(I'd be skeptical)
I think many young teachers do not go into teaching knowing where they will want/need to live for their whole career. Teaching salaries vary drastically from district to district. If a teacher ends up living in a rural area and didn't expect that, they can find a drastically reduced salary awaiting them compared to say, Boulder. Even someone who has taught for 25 years and has two masters degrees and tons of different certifications can find themselves facing huge pay cuts in such a move - i.e. as little as 30% of what they were making in Boulder, or less than the starting salary of a brand new teacher in their current district.

It is true people do not go into teaching to be rich, but it is not unreasonable for people who provide a very needed service that requires multiple degrees and continuing education throughout the entire career as well as generally requiring investment of out-of-pocket expenses to do one's job to the tune of hundreds or more of dollars annually to expect a salary that allows them to afford housing in or near where they teach (without having to take on additional jobs - many teachers work part-time jobs in addition to teaching to help make ends meet) and have at least a chance of paying off debts and not living entirely paycheck to paycheck if they are very careful, responsible and wise with their earnings. In many cases, our teachers do not get that, on top of difficult working conditions that contribute to high turnover and huge declines in people choosing the profession.

Teaching is not the only career in this boat - but among true professions it is one of the worst. It doesn't have to be this way - it isn't this way in most other 1st world countries.
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:55 PM
 
51 posts, read 12,364 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by satori View Post
Rant commencing in 3, 2, 1 ... Colorado is 31st in teacher pay nationwide, and the salaries are not nearly commensurate with the ever inflating cost of living (we rank 48th for housing affordability nationwide). As a state, our high school graduation rate is ranked 46th. Clearly we are doing something wrong here.....
You seem to understand the scope of the problem so I have to ask: why in Godís name would you consider having kids here only to send them to crap schools? I can see how Colorado would be a fun place to be young and single or a nice place for retirees but do you really want to raise kids here? When you look at how competitive the global economy has become, I would argue that there has never been a more important time to get your kids the absolutely best education that you can and that would not happen here. You will buy an overpriced house, become house poor and send your kids to schools that are mediocre at best. I just canít see your reasoning.

But if you insist, also check out Gunnison. Western State is there and Crested Butte is up the road. It does get very cold in the winter but summers are gorgeous. Best of luck.
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