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Old 02-19-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
3,157 posts, read 1,589,802 times
Reputation: 4207

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PcolaFLGuy View Post
Cool map! Thanks for sharing.

OP don't get too discouraged by the comments here. Lots of folks live year-round in the SLV and love it. Yet, most of them probably grew up there.

I think the CO posters get tired of folks thinking the SLV is cheap land for easy living. It's obviously not easy living. I'm not sure about the winters in London but for this FL boy their winters are just not doable year-round for me.

I, too, continue to dream of having a homestead there someday.
Interesting take on the weather. I consider south Florida to be livable for three months out of the year - I spend considerable time there. The valley is easy, for me, for about nine months out of the year. It isn't hard to put on warm clothes. It can be hard to work outdoors for a long time when below freezing.
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Old 02-19-2019, 05:16 PM
 
71 posts, read 7,863 times
Reputation: 34
Had a look at year-round weather charts and it looks great - warm in the summer and cold in the winter - just the way we like it !

Besides, the large daily difference between day and night is great - I quite enjoy a cold night after a warm sunny day and it makes sleeping better.
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Old Yesterday, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Pensacola, Florida
681 posts, read 670,004 times
Reputation: 446
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoGuy View Post
Interesting take on the weather. I consider south Florida to be livable for three months out of the year - I spend considerable time there. The valley is easy, for me, for about nine months out of the year. It isn't hard to put on warm clothes. It can be hard to work outdoors for a long time when below freezing.
I live in the FL panhandle. Much different climate here than South FL.
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Old Yesterday, 01:16 PM
 
11 posts, read 549 times
Reputation: 19
We are currently on the Front Range, but getting very tired of the growth, endless tract housing going up, traffic, constantly expanding highways, etc. We have spent a lot of time in the SLV and know it fairly well, but now we are considering buying some land down there.

I have my eye on several 35+ acre properties that have 'qualify for domestic wells.' In anyone's experience, does this mean there is a 100% certainty that such a well would be approved - I know the parcel must be at least 35 acres?

We are interested in having space for a few chickens, an acre or less to grow our own produce and that sort of thing. Knowing how arid the valley is, do people have goats, llamas, etc? Is that something that is feasible given the aridity and weather conditions?
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Old Yesterday, 02:14 PM
 
108 posts, read 152,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarsonMathers View Post
We are interested in having space for a few chickens, an acre or less to grow our own produce and that sort of thing. Knowing how arid the valley is, do people have goats, llamas, etc? Is that something that is feasible given the aridity and weather conditions?
I can't speak to the certainty of being approved for domestic well permits, but plenty of people in the valley have goats and llamas and alpacas (even camels, believe it or not!). If you can augment your water situation for your animals with a domestic well then you should be in good shape provided your livestock don't use more than your well can provide. In your case, I'd get the well drilled first, then add livestock once you know what your well can support. Definitely don't buy the livestock before you know what your particular water situation will be, and always plan and account for droughts. Wells can and do run dry out here in drought years, even with the relatively high water table of the valley. Last year was particularly brutal. Not a given, but something to be prepared for.

What part of the valley are you looking at?
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Old Yesterday, 02:25 PM
 
71 posts, read 7,863 times
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Why do want people grow stuff in a desert ? Why not just live there and enjoy the area as is ?
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Old Yesterday, 02:27 PM
 
20,615 posts, read 38,463,725 times
Reputation: 18612
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarsonMathers View Post
We are currently on the Front Range, but getting very tired of the growth, endless tract housing going up, traffic, constantly expanding highways, etc. We have spent a lot of time in the SLV and know it fairly well, but now we are considering buying some land down there.

I have my eye on several 35+ acre properties that have 'qualify for domestic wells.' In anyone's experience, does this mean there is a 100% certainty that such a well would be approved - I know the parcel must be at least 35 acres?

We are interested in having space for a few chickens, an acre or less to grow our own produce and that sort of thing. Knowing how arid the valley is, do people have goats, llamas, etc? Is that something that is feasible given the aridity and weather conditions?
Your other 3 postings say you're moving to Vermont....
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Old Yesterday, 02:33 PM
 
11 posts, read 549 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
Your other 3 postings say you're moving to Vermont....
Yes, we would like to stay in Colorado, but with the difficulties of water and land, we are considering a move east, where one can get a whole lot more for his money and not to worry as much about water.

However, the SLV is an option we have always toyed around with, but the seriousness of the water situation is the one drawback which keeps us very cautious and in the planning stages. If we're unable to make it work somewhere in Colorado, east it is most likely.

In many ways we do miss green, but also we love the aridity here, the sunny days and the dry air. It's always a give and take I suppose.
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Old Yesterday, 02:38 PM
 
11 posts, read 549 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by interloper1138 View Post
I can't speak to the certainty of being approved for domestic well permits, but plenty of people in the valley have goats and llamas and alpacas (even camels, believe it or not!). If you can augment your water situation for your animals with a domestic well then you should be in good shape provided your livestock don't use more than your well can provide. In your case, I'd get the well drilled first, then add livestock once you know what your well can support. Definitely don't buy the livestock before you know what your particular water situation will be, and always plan and account for droughts. Wells can and do run dry out here in drought years, even with the relatively high water table of the valley. Last year was particularly brutal. Not a given, but something to be prepared for.

What part of the valley are you looking at?
Thanks interloper. Yes, obviously before we purchased, we would make exactly sure of the water allowance and then do the well, septic, etc first before even relocating to the parcel. We are looking between Alamosa and Great Sand Dunes. We have experience running AirBnbs, so we are also looking into the prospect of having some sort of space for that as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperviktor View Post
Why do want people grow stuff in a desert ? Why not just live there and enjoy the area as is ?
You realize most of the West is arid and semi-arid right? Many people who live here want to be able to grow a bit of veg and have a few chickens, just as many people everywhere. From your posts, it seems you've not been to the area. Would you prefer all Coloradans submit to people like you who want to build their second homes and come in a few months a year with a hot tub in the desert?
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Old Yesterday, 02:42 PM
 
108 posts, read 152,213 times
Reputation: 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperviktor View Post
Why do want people grow stuff in a desert ? Why not just live there and enjoy the area as is ?
Most people have to make a living and the San Luis Valley's primary industries are agriculture and ranching. Some of the best potatoes you'll ever have in your life are grown near Center. Barley grown here goes many places, including Coors Brewing. The first non-indigenous people to settle in Colorado lived in the San Luis Valley and were primarily sheepherders and farmers that came up from what is now Northern New Mexico.

Homesteading, agriculture, and ranching in the SLV are ways of life that date back centuries.
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