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Old 03-29-2019, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,003 posts, read 2,013,462 times
Reputation: 3461

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The high and dry air tends to suck a lot of moisture out of the snow. Champagne powder is a common term for it. Stuff like that can be done with a broom or leaf blower. It can come down nearly anytime during the year but is typically done by mid-late Feb.

After Feb, the moisture content goes up along with the weight of the snow. Of course, we can get a reasonably heavy snow at anytime during the winter that will require some shovel work. We also can get the occasional blizzard with drifting snow that can either leave your yard bare or hide your front door, depending on wind direction.

For the majority of cities along I-25, snow will not sit around and accumulate all winter and get rock hard while it grows into 15-20' high piles. In the early to mid winter it may last a couple of weeks before it melts away. In the late winter, early spring it wouldn't be around for more than a few days.

Inexpensive real estate and New Mexico like climate would probably land you in Pueblo, FWIW.
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Old 03-29-2019, 04:03 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
898 posts, read 374,878 times
Reputation: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
The high and dry air tends to suck a lot of moisture out of the snow. Champagne powder is a common term for it. Stuff like that can be done with a broom or leaf blower. It can come down nearly anytime during the year but is typically done by mid-late Feb.

After Feb, the moisture content goes up along with the weight of the snow. Of course, we can get a reasonably heavy snow at anytime during the winter that will require some shovel work. We also can get the occasional blizzard with drifting snow that can either leave your yard bare or hide your front door, depending on wind direction.

For the majority of cities along I-25, snow will not sit around and accumulate all winter and get rock hard while it grows into 15-20' high piles. In the early to mid winter it may last a couple of weeks before it melts away. In the late winter, early spring it wouldn't be around for more than a few days.

Inexpensive real estate and New Mexico like climate would probably land you in Pueblo, FWIW.
Lol funny that Pueblo sounds like the type of name that belongs in New Mexico. New Mexico does get snow, but not a lot, but I heard all of CO gets a lot of snow, so are you sure Pueblo would have a climate similar to New Mexico?
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Old 03-29-2019, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,476 posts, read 10,079,351 times
Reputation: 9645
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
Lol funny that Pueblo sounds like the type of name that belongs in New Mexico. New Mexico does get snow, but not a lot, but I heard all of CO gets a lot of snow, so are you sure Pueblo would have a climate similar to New Mexico?
What constitutes "a lot" of snow?
  • Grand Junction - 19"
  • Pueblo - 31"
  • Denver - 54"
  • Colorado Springs - 38"
  • Fort Collins - 54"
  • Monument - 110"
  • Breckenridge - 164"

Monument sits at 7,000' on the Palmer Divide and Breckenridge is smack dab in the middle of the mountains at 9,600'.

Compare that to
  • Newark - 31"
  • Trenton - 30"
  • Hoboken - 22"
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Old 03-29-2019, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Denver 'burbs
21,643 posts, read 22,915,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
Lol funny that Pueblo sounds like the type of name that belongs in New Mexico. New Mexico does get snow, but not a lot, but I heard all of CO gets a lot of snow, so are you sure Pueblo would have a climate similar to New Mexico?
Colorado and New Mexico share a border. The climate doesn't change as soon as you step over.

This is why we keep asking "where" in Colorado you mean. Colorado is a large state compared to NJ with a much more varied topography and climate. "Where" is significant.

Last edited by maciesmom; 03-29-2019 at 04:53 PM..
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Old 03-29-2019, 07:03 PM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
3,165 posts, read 6,963,739 times
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I live in the Colorado mountains where we typically get a lot of snow, a neighbor has an EGO electric snowblower and it works great. I plan on getting one for next winter once I can digest the price of $600. Living near a ski resort requires very different power tools than living in Colorado Springs.

I have also lived in Santa fe and one of the hardest snowstorms I have been through was there, close to 3 feet and only a couple plows for the whole city, then the sun came out and it melted a few days later. That is the difference between the West and the Northeast (I grew up in CT) we have sun out here, strong beautiful sun and low humidity lead to fluffy powder that can melt off quickly. Colorado and New Mexico are very different states in many ways but the climate along the border is similar, the climate in Santa fe is a lot like Denver and Taos ski area can be like a Colorado ski area. Visit both and decide on your move based on which you like more, snow out here is nothing like NJ, no one ever moves back to NJ because the Colorado winters are too hard.
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Old 03-29-2019, 10:39 PM
 
36 posts, read 23,300 times
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I would give serious thought before I bought an electric snowblower. My neighbors got one two years ago and it takes both of them to operate it. One to drive and the other the hold the cord to make sure it does not get ran over. I usually get my sidewalk shoveled by hand before they get theirs done with the snowblower and we are both on corner lots.
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Old 03-30-2019, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,003 posts, read 2,013,462 times
Reputation: 3461
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
Lol funny that Pueblo sounds like the type of name that belongs in New Mexico. New Mexico does get snow, but not a lot, but I heard all of CO gets a lot of snow, so are you sure Pueblo would have a climate similar to New Mexico?

What you've heard depends on where you are at as demonstrated by another poster. Wolf Creek gets upwards of 400 inches of snow a year which takes until August to melt. Pueblo, typically gets a few inches each month during the winter, which then evaporates within the next couple of days.

The southern part of CO is very similar to NM. Southern CO tends to be different than northern CO. I'd suggest you do some more research on it to see if it aligns with your expectations of what New Mexico would have been. Have you been out here before? New Jersey to the Rockies is a radial change if you aren't prepared for it, whether in NE or CO.
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Old 03-30-2019, 08:30 PM
Status: "Signing off due to heavy handed mods" (set 3 days ago)
 
728 posts, read 361,816 times
Reputation: 1139
Just wonder...
If the type of snowblower influences your decision...
You aren’t ready to move...at all.
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Old 03-31-2019, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,715 posts, read 4,812,865 times
Reputation: 16785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan07 View Post
I would give serious thought before I bought an electric snowblower. My neighbors got one two years ago and it takes both of them to operate it. One to drive and the other the hold the cord to make sure it does not get ran over. I usually get my sidewalk shoveled by hand before they get theirs done with the snowblower and we are both on corner lots.
I have an electric snow blower and it does a fine job 90% of the time

https://www.snowjoe.com/collections/...0aAqJgEALw_wcB

If I have a large drift I just knock it down 12 inches at a time and blow the snow away.

The advantage of the electric blower is that it is lightweight. It's easy to move and use. The limit is likely a 15 amp circuit capacity in your garage outlet. Check that out so your outlet can provide the required current.
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Old 03-31-2019, 04:58 AM
 
4,302 posts, read 1,240,602 times
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Or, go with the old shovel. It's a great way to stay active and avoid having to go to the gym.
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