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Old 05-14-2019, 03:32 PM
 
999 posts, read 552,617 times
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While still currently an East-Coaster, my girlfriend and I are having some incredibly serious talks about moving to rural or semi-rural Colorado. She is a teacher. My background is as a tradesman and a small business owner, but I have a bachelor's degree and have considered teaching as a profession.

Everything I read about when it comes to schools in Colorado brings up the topic of a supposedly severe teacher shortage. Is this true? If so, how severe is it? Could anyone in-the-know, especially if you are a teacher or directly involved in the school system give me a rundown?

I'm trying to determine if it would be worth it to use up the remainder of my GI Bill benefits to attain a M.Ed. and apply it to Colorado specifically.

What is it like working in Colorado schools? Are there curriculum or discipline problems? Are they worse than elsewhere? Is the pay ridiculously low? Are there lifestyle problems that teachers encounter? I also have concerns that being male would hinder my career development as feminists (which, thankfully, my girlfriend is not a nutcase in this regard) within school systems are likely to try to sabotage my career or even to "Kavanaugh" me unjustly. One cannot be too careful it seems.

But anyway, rant aside, what is the deal with the teacher shortage in Colorado? How badly are teachers needed, especially in some of the more semi-rural areas?

Also: taxation is a concern if I move. I do not want to be taxed to deal and Colorado seems to be descending into a liberal cesspool, (though that seems to be happening almost everywhere) which leads me to being very wary about Colorado specifically. And what if I want to continue my business there? My preference would be Utah or Wyoming, but she likes Colorado and we would find the weather and outdoor life on the Western Slope to be pretty decent.
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Old 05-14-2019, 03:50 PM
 
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Since you have a trades background I suggest you look into the backdoor qualifications to teach vocational education - there is a very severe shortage there in Colorado because Colorado does not have a traditional college-degree path to certification in many of the trades areas. https://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeprof/cte_generalinfo#01

Working in CO schools imho is about the same as anywhere else. Rural schools tend to offer lower pay and are less likely to have the trades programs, though - this might be offset by lower cost of living but do your research before you settle on a particular district/area. Specific teacher need varies considerably by content area. Greatest needs are in Special Education, English Language Learners, Math, Science and Vocational/Tech fields, generally speaking. If you want to teach P.E. or Social Studies you're a dime a dozen.

There are plenty of males in education. No need to worry about a mass conspiracy against men that could affect your career. As long as you're not a jerk to the opposite sex or something you should have no issues.

There are also plenty of conservatives in Colorado, moreso away from the Denver area. Colorado is very much a live-and-let-live state, so public political digs and insults tend not to go over well.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Del Norte, CO
27 posts, read 8,218 times
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We have a shortage, especially in rural areas, but all rural areas across the US seem to have that. My husband is a rural school counselor and his pay is crap and insurance costs are high. Personally, watching education over the last 10 year or so, I never encourage anyone to go into it. However, if you do come here, you might want to check out alternative licensure paths too. Of course, having a masters means more pay but not enough for what a masters should be worth. And like otowi wrote, there are subject areas with major shortages and that is something to take into consideration.

Wyoming is actually a harder state to get a foothold in without teaching experience because they have excellent teacher pay. I am sure there are some shortages there but I doubt it is as severe. I have no idea about Utah.

There are definitely conservatives still in Colorado. I tend to vote blue and live in a sea of red. Politics never really comes up day to day.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:55 AM
 
31 posts, read 3,908 times
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OP. If you are going to use terms like "liberal cesspool", please stay where you are or move to UT/WY like you want. We do not need any extremists here, ESPECIALLY if you are going to be teaching.
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:24 PM
 
551 posts, read 267,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breoul View Post
OP. If you are going to use terms like "liberal cesspool", please stay where you are or move to UT/WY like you want. We do not need any extremists here, ESPECIALLY if you are going to be teaching.
Works BOTH ways, esp. with teachers/professors at *most* educational institutions.

CU had a tough time recently getting a new President just because of that.
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Old 05-15-2019, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Del Norte, CO
27 posts, read 8,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breoul View Post
OP. If you are going to use terms like "liberal cesspool", please stay where you are or move to UT/WY like you want. We do not need any extremists here, ESPECIALLY if you are going to be teaching.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Works BOTH ways, esp. with teachers/professors at *most* educational institutions.

CU had a tough time recently getting a new President just because of that.
I agree with both of you. I think educators need to try to be balanced. I know of both liberal and conservative teachers in our district and especially when it comes to subjects like Social Studies/History their bias is really easy to see based on how they present the information. I suspected my daughter's US History teacher trended to the right because of that and I didn't have an issue with it until one assignment recently. He had them write whether they were liberal or conservative and their take on three hot issues. In a later class, he said that people who had certain views on two of the issues were hypocrites. That included my daughter though he didn't mention names. I don't feel it is his job, or any teacher's job, to criticize political viewpoints. It would have been more effective to use those political differences to facilitate a discussion that might show all students different ideas.

I am actually glad my daughter is exposed to more conservative ideas because she is plenty indoctrinated on the liberal side of things here at home. I don't want her living in a bubble but I do think educators need to be respectful of all of their students.
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Old 05-15-2019, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,022 posts, read 2,024,710 times
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Colorado is a big state and it has 181 separate school districts. I don't know that you could characterize it too broadly outside of those conditions that all states deal with in funding, retirement, pay, urban vs rural. Your other questions will not only vary from district to district but can also change from school to school within a district.

If you can narrow done the geography of were your rural to semi-rural living might be, we maybe able to provide better set of answers.
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Old 05-15-2019, 03:15 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 910,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Works BOTH ways, esp. with teachers/professors at *most* educational institutions.

CU had a tough time recently getting a new President just because of that.
Yeah just about every teacher I have interacted with at a social setting has been a way far left wacko. I had one start yelling at me at a party when she found out I worked in oil. I told her shes welcome for the tax revenue to pay her salary. I am sure there are good teachers in the state, but my kids wont go to public school. Charter or private.

This state has a lot of great things to offer....public education is not one of them.
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Old 05-15-2019, 09:19 PM
 
5,283 posts, read 7,102,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammy87 View Post
Y I am sure there are good teachers in the state, but my kids wont go to public school. Charter or private.
Don't be surprised to find that teachers in charter and private schools also have political views. That is no cure.


I agree that teachers who teach content that touches on politics should not teach in a way that ridicules a student for siding with one party or another, etc., but that they should teach in a way that promotes critical thinking and the ability to entertain and understand the variety of perspectives on issues. FWIW, I work in a public school and there are conservatives as well as liberals. Guess what? Not only liberals think educating the next generation of our youth is a noble pursuit.
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Old 05-16-2019, 12:13 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
13,854 posts, read 20,003,520 times
Reputation: 22322
Quote:
Originally Posted by InchingWest View Post
Colorado seems to be descending into a liberal cesspool
And, most of us are happy to smell like anaerobic socialist poop.
As goes Venezuela, so goes Colorado. After all, they are both palabras Español.
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