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Old 02-21-2012, 02:36 AM
 
Location: relocating
69 posts, read 155,185 times
Reputation: 29

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Quote:
Originally Posted by retrocarnation View Post
I will lead this off with a confession that many of you here will just slather at- I am a conservative. That said, let's move on.......
It is a liberal town. Exclusively liberal. Read that one more time.

For the bubble-bursting part of the rosey, be all, end all view, the truth is you had better come here with someone's money. (Your own or your trust fund.) This is a VERY EXPENSIVE place to live. The truth, as printed in the newspaper, is that the average house price is $430,000. Gasp. The average wage is around the $10.00/hour neighborhood. Gasp, take 2.
Did I mention it is exclusively liberal? Oh, sorry.
The supposed nightlife consists of watching the throngs of drunken 20-somethings stumbling through downtown, going from one bar to the next. Most normal folks over the age of 25 will be at home when this is happening. The town is virtually dark past 10:00 P.M. unless you would like to hang around the ONLY 24 hour business in town. This is where the real action is as the police are usually within 100 yards at any given time on a Friday or Saturday night. They have to be- this is where all the afore-mentioned drunken people go to sober up.
Oh, and it is totally liberal! Oops, I said that.<TRUNCATED>
Very well written, and most importantly, consistent with other posts on "Http://city-data.com"
Sounds like another liberal college town that doesn't want to attract major businesses and industries. A service economy plus natural gas and the college that won't add a PhD program. Lots of potential, but nobody is willing to make any changes. But that is NOT unique to Durango. All these places sound the same way. Therefore, since life is short, and opportunities are elsewhere. However, as always, a GREAT PLACE to visit. Thanks . . .

Quote:
Hey, it is what it is, and your experience may be different from mine. But I've seen it from both sides- I've lived in large cities, I've lived in small cities, and without a doubt if you're a single professional in your thirties and your top priority is having the healthiest dating/social life possible, you are far better off in a big city than in a small western slope mountain town, or for that matter any small town anywhere. I don't think too many people would argue against that. I mean, honestly, I've been to Houston, and if that were my top priority, Houston would win hands down. There are literally loads of hot, single women there, and the ratio is much more favorable.

Don't get me wrong, Durango is great for lots of reasons; the social life, at least for a single guy my age, is not one of them.
Thanks.... Agree, it does seem you are correct that it's just about *ANY* small town, except Boulder, due in part to its connections to major high tech employers in town, the PhD program, and nearby adjacent cities in the Denver Metro. Corvallis, Oregon, another exception.

Also, it seems that small towns with little industry such as Durango, Santa Cruz, Olympia, Bend, Bellingham, etc. are very pretentious, and too political, since the 18-30 age demo is very idealistic. It just is what it is, until all of these places - Durango included - decide to quadruple their populations, and add PhD programs to their colleges . . .

People REALLY need to KNOW this information about Durango and elsewhere, so why aren't the Chamber of Commerces giving this advice to those over 25? I suppose some chambers focus on promoting tourism, since that's the predominant driver of their economy.

Still, I can't understand why this is the case. This deserves explanation from all small town chambers. Durango received a #1 recognition from Policom, but these posters do not suggest that this is the case. Maybe it's #1 if you're employed as a college student. I have no idea.

It's just one small town copying another small town, all competing for the same demographic of college students and tourists. I've been to Bend, Ashland, South Lake Tahoe, Reno, Mammoth Lakes, Durango, Eugene, Flagstaff, Prescott, Santa Cruz, Fort Collins, etc. - Same thing everywhere - same architecture - same demographics - big box apartments - 97% Caucasian - growth regulations - high taxes - only the Very Rich can afford to own a home.

The only three I've seen that stand out are Boulder, Santa Fe, Palm Springs, and Corvallis, due to their diversity in employment, ethnicities, and ages. Santa Fe might be the best of these four since it's genuine and the people are diverse, the architecture isn't cookie cutter, and it's close to Albuquerque with 900K in the metro. But even these last four are small, and I'd hesitate to move to, for some the same reasons I wouldn't move to Durango, but I would still love to visit there periodically.

So I don't want to ruin this for anyone who is moving to Durango for whatever reason but I am glad that these posters have validated my concerns. For me it's just a frustration with a select group of similar liberal college towns that are blips on the radar screen on a US map. They're all the same. None of them wants to change in a significant way, they all are anti-growth, anti-innovation, and they could all do a lot more to draw more college grads as permanent residents.

First, however, they need MBA's, MLA's, and PhD's on their City staff, never local Realtors and Developers. Urban planners should be banned from sitting on city councils, by ordinance. All these folks build the cookie cutter stuff, and establish the urban growth lines to encompass their property .... so that they can speculate with their land the next time they vote to approve the next boundary extension. They should move to Salt Lake City where one can't do that since there's no urban growth boundary. But this sort of thing happens in these small towns all the time, and that's why they're so expensive.

Ed Glaeser, Harvard, PhD, economic geography and urban planning
Harvard Econ Department - Edward Glaeser - Papers (http://www.economics.harvard.edu/faculty/glaeser/papers_glaeser - broken link)
Particularly THIS paper on why people leave places due to education and social factors,
http://www.economics.harvard.edu/faculty/glaeser/files/Social_Capital.pdf (broken link)

Last edited by JuniperRidge1; 02-21-2012 at 04:02 AM.. Reason: Frustration with a select group of similar cities all offering the same thing over and over and over the western US
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Old 02-21-2012, 10:30 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,834,746 times
Reputation: 2615
Wink Air to Durango

Durango has regional air service. I have not checked the schedules, but in major airports this extends to at least Denver, CO and Albuquerque, NM, being the two closest. You will pay a premium to get in and out of town. There is the option of flying out of nearby Farmington, NM as well, but with about the same cost structure. Moreover, as Farmington is not much of a tourist destination, probably not the same selection of flight destinations.

As far as I know neither Bayfield or Pagosa Springs has regional air service. Both, or at least Pagosa, surely with air strips for private planes. Pagosa is far enough removed from Durango that one might not want to have to fly out of there much.

Climate of these three places will be similar, and not much in the way of 90+ in summer. Durango and Bayfield are probably climatically most similar, although some variance as Durango's location is more sheltered. Of the three, Pagosa may experience the coldest winters, and possibly most snow as well. All these places are in a general sense in the mountains, and yet really not. All will receive snow, and depending on the year a white Christmas or not, but probably at least some snow somewhere about. Durango can serve as example: it will receive some snow throughout the winter, but Silverton, which is decidedly in the mountains, will really and reliably have snow. Oh, and that much cooler at all times as well.

For all these locations think isolation, and the rewards and prices paid in that, and some idea of that considered.
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Old 02-21-2012, 07:59 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,575,345 times
Reputation: 1883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Durango has regional air service. I have not checked the schedules, but in major airports this extends to at least Denver, CO and Albuquerque, NM, being the two closest. You will pay a premium to get in and out of town. There is the option of flying out of nearby Farmington, NM as well, but with about the same cost structure. Moreover, as Farmington is not much of a tourist destination, probably not the same selection of flight destinations.

As far as I know neither Bayfield or Pagosa Springs has regional air service. Both, or at least Pagosa, surely with air strips for private planes. Pagosa is far enough removed from Durango that one might not want to have to fly out of there much.
Decent airfares can be had out of DRO form time to time. Connections from DRO are Denver, Albuquerque, & Dallas. Albuquerque is a 3-1/2 to 4 hr drive. $100 one way fares between DRO & Denver are common so you can build your own trips to/ from Denver and just set yourself up with one way flights between DRO & Denver to commute to the cheaper flights.
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Old 02-22-2012, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Durango, CO
118 posts, read 267,947 times
Reputation: 184
I agree with most of Idunn's comments above, with the two minor exceptions. I'm not aware of any air service from DGO to ABQ. (I know UAL flies to denver ~6 times per day, American flies to Dallas, US Air flies to Denver and someone, possibly Frontier, services Phoenix). Also, having flown United 40+ times from Durango over the last 2 1/2 years, I haven't seen any premium paid for flying from DGO...at least not compared to flying from the NYC metro airports.
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Old 02-22-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Durango, CO
169 posts, read 318,184 times
Reputation: 257
[quote=Idunn;23077575]Durango has regional air service. I have not checked the schedules, but in major airports this extends to at least Denver, CO and Albuquerque, NM, being the two closest. You will pay a premium to get in and out of town.

As JChasse said, I have to disagree with this. I'm constantly on the lookout for cheap flights for my family to fly here from the east coast, and r/t flights from Atlanta are typically less than $400. My mother even flew here r/t from podunk Louisville, KY in January for $350 on United! A friend is flying in from Louisville this weekend and paid $497 r/t. Don't forget, Louisville isn't exactly Chicago, Dallas, NY, etc, which I assume have even cheaper flights. Frontier, American, United, and U.S. Airways all have service here so it's just not as bad as some would have you believe.
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:59 PM
 
5 posts, read 9,886 times
Reputation: 10
Default Durango quality of life

Hi gang,

46 year old active duty enlisted military member here approaching retirement. Looking at Durango, Grand Junction and Gunnison areas as a possible retirement home. Not a "survivalist" type here but, I've seen my share of the good and bad of this world and just looking for a place to settle down away from the BIG city. Married with one child at home and would be looking to build on 1 or 2 acres if affordable. Is Durango in or close to mountainous terrain? I prefer the mountains or high hills over flatlands. I like to garden a bit so a healthy southern exposure and short growing season is a consideration. Active in Elk, Moose, VFW AND American Legion so thats important to us also. Not looking for a region with hotbed liberal or ultra-conservatives either. Id appreciate your thoughts. Thanks.
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Old 04-03-2012, 01:28 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,784,136 times
Reputation: 18081
theyankeerebel, Durango is indeed in / near the mountains.

Growing season is short in COLO due to elevation. Water can be an issue here relative to what you can do with a well, be sure to check that aspect when considering any property.

The city has a lot of retirees, from all over, and is a bit pricey since so many people want to live in a beautiful setting.

Gunnison seems a bit isolated and can be brutally cold in winter.

Grand Junction is more of a high-desert locale, can get very warm in summer and suffer air inversions in the winter.

All 3 will give you good scenery. My preference would be Durango for scenery and in my case for the tourist train that runs there.
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Old 04-03-2012, 01:36 PM
 
5 posts, read 9,886 times
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Thanks Mike,

I don't mind the cold. If I could talk the Mrs. Into it, I'd be living in the Yukon. Isolation is good. Ive had my fun. However, proximity to medical care and some semblance of civilization is the tradeoff I'm making in the deal here.
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Old 04-03-2012, 02:05 PM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,784,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theyankeerebel View Post
Thanks Mike,

I don't mind the cold. If I could talk the Mrs. Into it, I'd be living in the Yukon. Isolation is good. Ive had my fun. However, proximity to medical care and some semblance of civilization is the tradeoff I'm making in the deal here.
A quick search of the internet reveals the following, which may not be total, but seems close enough.

Gunnison has a small 24-bed county hospital.

Durango has two hospitals: Mercy Regional Med Center and Animas Surgical Center. There is also a hospital over in Farmington, NM.

Grand Junction has two hospitals: St. Mary's Regional and Community Hospital.

Some severe or rare health issues may require a trip to a major city like Denver.

Durango and Grand Junction are probably more equal in terms of medical care. IMO scenery issues cause me to rank Durango first due to the mountainous nature of the area.

Both have enough critical mass to have the level of civilization you seek.

Durango has more resort-retirement orientation.

Grand Junction is more of a working town.
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- Please follow our TOS.
- Any Questions about City-Data? See the FAQ list.
- Want some detailed instructions on using the site? See The Guide for plain english explanation.
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Old 04-03-2012, 06:57 PM
 
276 posts, read 583,293 times
Reputation: 443
Quote:
Originally Posted by theyankeerebel View Post
Hi gang,

46 year old active duty enlisted military member here approaching retirement. Looking at Durango, Grand Junction and Gunnison areas as a possible retirement home. Not a "survivalist" type here but, I've seen my share of the good and bad of this world and just looking for a place to settle down away from the BIG city. Married with one child at home and would be looking to build on 1 or 2 acres if affordable. Is Durango in or close to mountainous terrain? I prefer the mountains or high hills over flatlands. I like to garden a bit so a healthy southern exposure and short growing season is a consideration. Active in Elk, Moose, VFW AND American Legion so thats important to us also. Not looking for a region with hotbed liberal or ultra-conservatives either. Id appreciate your thoughts. Thanks.
I can only comment on Durango, so here's my take.

Let me start by saying that Durango is a liberal town. A VERY liberal town. Comparable to Boulder in a lot of ways. You'll see lots of hippies with un-washed hair and t-shirts with peace signs riding bikes and driving Subarus all over town.

As for finding an "affordable" 1 or 2 acre lot, good luck with that. Property like that goes is VERY expensive around here.

I'm not sure what your financial situation is, but there's a statement around here that says "Wanna be a millionaire in Durango? Better come with 2 or 3 million."

Just some stuff to think about.
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