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Old 01-16-2007, 11:16 PM
 
16 posts, read 85,046 times
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Just a few thoughts about all of these relocations from the warm climate states--I grew up in Florida and lived there until age 25--then moved to Denver for 8 years and Salt Lake City for past 7 years.
Despite the many quotes of "perfect climate" I feel we must be very realistic to people who have never lived in this kind of weather--the winters in the Intermountain West--ie Colorado and Utah go from November to April--snow is often falling in October as well.Spring often is very short and filled with rain/snow storms mixed with sunny days.Late April/early MAy is "mud season"--meaning still cold but snow is melting off and all is a slushy mess in the mountains.
In short,except for mid June-early September, you must carry fleece or layers with you at all times, especially in the evening.
The scenery is beautiful, no doubt about that.If you love to ski--I mean really love outdoor winter sports, then this is paradise.
But if you ski once a year,really think twice if you want to deal with a 6+ month winter weather pattern.
Also, living in Denver is NOT close to the ski resorts.On the weekends when most people actually get time off to ski, the drive is 2 hours plus each way--does a 4 hour commute(often on icy roads) really seem to be something you'll do often?
Think about all of this before you move--the cold short days of winter are really long after the newness of the first year wears off.
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Old 01-16-2007, 11:34 PM
Status: "Planning for the future." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,688 posts, read 28,559,803 times
Reputation: 6860
There are places east of Denver Bennette/Strausburg/Deer Trail & north Erie/Dacona/ft lupton that also might be what you are looking for.

Everything depends on your price range. Your needs for a sticks and bricks house versus a mobile home. Your need to have horses, or donkeys, or llamas...and how much you plan on spending for water (well & septic primarily)
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:54 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,374 posts, read 40,217,262 times
Reputation: 13181
Quote:
Originally Posted by westerndog View Post
Just a few thoughts about all of these relocations from the warm climate states--I grew up in Florida and lived there until age 25--then moved to Denver for 8 years and Salt Lake City for past 7 years.
Despite the many quotes of "perfect climate" I feel we must be very realistic to people who have never lived in this kind of weather--the winters in the Intermountain West--ie Colorado and Utah go from November to April--snow is often falling in October as well.Spring often is very short and filled with rain/snow storms mixed with sunny days.Late April/early MAy is "mud season"--meaning still cold but snow is melting off and all is a slushy mess in the mountains.
In short,except for mid June-early September, you must carry fleece or layers with you at all times, especially in the evening.
The scenery is beautiful, no doubt about that.If you love to ski--I mean really love outdoor winter sports, then this is paradise.
But if you ski once a year,really think twice if you want to deal with a 6+ month winter weather pattern.
Also, living in Denver is NOT close to the ski resorts.On the weekends when most people actually get time off to ski, the drive is 2 hours plus each way--does a 4 hour commute(often on icy roads) really seem to be something you'll do often?
Think about all of this before you move--the cold short days of winter are really long after the newness of the first year wears off.
As someone who left Colorado for northern Florida, I agree it can be quite a transition.

And I *don't* mean to be a naysayer to anyone who wants to live in Colorado--it is a glorious state--but I do think that westerndog's headsup here deserves consideration.

The last hard freeze in Colorado for the past 8 years has actually been in May, and the last measurable snow for the past 2 years has been in May.
Winter you expect, but spring can be a grim slog.
But summer/fall usually make up for it, despite the occasional autumn snows.
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Old 01-17-2007, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 19,313,102 times
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Westerndog and Cil, Thank you for all your comments, this is exactly what I am looking for in comments. We have been looking for some where to move for two years now, but haven't found the right place. We have found that each part of the country has their own issue (earthquakes, tornadoes, snow, rain, hurricanes, heat, etc). So we give up humidity and hurricanes for whatever the new place has. It all depends what one wants to deal with.

Diveristy wise would you say Colorado is similiar to North, Central, or South Florida (probably not)? To give me some sort of idea.

Westerndog, when you moved, were you in the end, glad you left Florida?
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Old 01-17-2007, 11:29 AM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,534,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westerndog View Post
In short,except for mid June-early September, you must carry fleece or layers with you at all times, especially in the evening.
Actually, in the mountains you need to dress in layers year-round, even in July. This is a warning well worth heeding.
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Old 01-17-2007, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Back to Colorado in 2019
7,075 posts, read 16,034,482 times
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We live in Parker and it takes me about 40 minutes from my house door to the door where I work at, which is about 2 miles north of downtown Denver. I start work at 7AM, so have very, very little traffic. The end of the T-Rex/I-25Project really helped my travel time a lot.
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Old 01-17-2007, 01:00 PM
 
Location: on an island
13,374 posts, read 40,217,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
Actually, in the mountains you need to dress in layers year-round, even in July. This is a warning well worth heeding.
You got that right, Tfox.
I remember a few camping trips where it was so warm down in Denver that it didn't seem possible that I'd get chilly up in the mountains.
Thank goodness my husband is the Always Be Prepared type.
Layers simply are a part of life in Colorado, esp up in the Rockies.
Better to have it and not need it...

In terms of diversity, here are some stats from City Data:
Races in Denver:

* White Non-Hispanic (51.9%)
* Hispanic (31.7%)
* Other race (15.6%)
* Black (11.1%)
* Two or more races (3.7%)
* American Indian (2.2%)
* Vietnamese (0.8%)

(Total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics could be counted in other races)

It's hard for me to compare it to north Florida because my little town is just so tiny, but I think that Denver *probably* has more types of ethnicities than you'd find in north Florida.
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Old 01-17-2007, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 19,313,102 times
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Cil - Wow, I am happy to see the numbers, I really didn't expect so much diversity. This is great news. I like layering so that is a plus for me already.

Thank you for the info.
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Old 04-09-2007, 03:44 PM
 
11 posts, read 73,343 times
Reputation: 13
Default Moving from Florida to Aurora

I can not longer afford living in Miami and I have the opportunity to transfer to Aurora. However, I am not familiar with the area. I will like to purchase a house and my budget is 250 to 270. Any ideas? I have a son that will be going to Highschool soon.
I seen houses in Aurora but they simm a bit old. I will like a newer home.
Thanks for any advice
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Old 04-09-2007, 05:18 PM
 
20,349 posts, read 37,885,022 times
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Ricky: There is a LOT of info here on Aurora.

Use Search this Forum tool with keyword AURORA to get tons of info, without anyone repeating what's already here.
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