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Old 07-08-2007, 05:58 PM
 
62 posts, read 309,205 times
Reputation: 45

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Another Florida family thats also looking. The resume was sent last week for a job in Denver.

If my wife gets the job, this would be such a big change for us, that I think we are going to rent for a year and learn the area.
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Old 07-08-2007, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
4 posts, read 10,176 times
Reputation: 12
Default Snow fall

We are finding that Longmont is looking to be a city with a lot of positives!!

But, there seems to be a con of snow fall--- we love snow, but there are different types, how does colorado snow compare to say snow from the northeastern side of the U.S.
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Old 07-08-2007, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,033 posts, read 98,948,726 times
Reputation: 31502
It's hard to compare, frankly. I grew up in the Pittsburgh area. I would say there is more snow here, but it doesn't hang around as long as in Pgh. It also rains a lot in Pgh in the winter; it hardly ever does that here. The days between snowstorms here are usually warm (for winter) and sunny.
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Old 07-08-2007, 11:23 PM
 
Location: South of Denver
291 posts, read 1,885,821 times
Reputation: 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackiedevito View Post
we love snow, but there are different types, how does colorado snow compare to say snow from the northeastern side of the U.S.
The difference is like day & night. I lived near Pittsburgh, and Colorado snow is much lighter and the abundant sunshine melts it in a hurry. One of the most interesting phenomena I noticed here that you never see in the midwest is snow melting so fast in the sun that it turns to a mist instead of trickling down the street.

Of course, exceptions exist, but if you 'sorta' like snow, Colorado's version is MUCH easier to live with.
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Old 07-11-2007, 10:34 PM
 
4 posts, read 33,695 times
Reputation: 10
Default Colorado Springs

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackiedevito View Post
My fiance and I would like to move to CO from FL. We are bringing the whole family with us sisters, brothers, parents...We are going to start a family and would like an area that is close to the city but still in the mountains. Any advice on certain cities to go to and stay away from?

I live in Colorado Springs, and would recommend Woodland Park. Just up the pass and a very nice small town. Do you need assistantance with purchasing a home in this area. I am a local Realtor.
Frank Schlosser

Last edited by mdz; 07-12-2007 at 07:58 AM.. Reason: advertising
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Old 07-12-2007, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Colorado
156 posts, read 875,617 times
Reputation: 37
What part of Tampa are you from? I'm from CO but currently in Tampa. I can give you some comparisons. Denver and CO Springs have a lot more nice areas to choose from than Tampa.
The winters can be rough if you are a warm weather person, the further in the mountains the less warmth you will get.
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Old 07-13-2007, 10:36 PM
 
8 posts, read 17,452 times
Reputation: 10
Default Family moving from Miami

My wife, 5-month-old son, and I may be moving to Denver, from Miami, this summer and we are looking for info on good neighborhoods in the city and suburbs. I would be working downtown and would like my commute to be no more than 30 minutes, and, ideally, would have access to public transportation. Here's what we're looking for in neighborhoods:

-Safe
-Some charm and maybe a little history, i.e., leafy streets, older homes with wood floors and arched doorways (not cookie-cutter subdivisions)
-Prices $450K or under
-A yard (could be small)
-Other young families
-Ideally, good access to mountains

I was in Denver very recently to interview and had a chance to briefly drive around West Wash Park and Highlands. The bungalow homes in both neighborhoods did not impress me that much, but I can see why both neighborhoods are popular with young families. Are there other desirable neighborhoods in Denver proper and the nearby suburbs? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:35 AM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,525,507 times
Reputation: 1457
West Wash Park and Highlands were both middle-class rather than upper-class areas when they were built back around the turn of the century, so the homes there aren't quite so grand or large as some of the districts built for the upper class around that time. However, I doubt you'll be able to afford one of those grand old mansions on your budget, however, a charming Craftsman or Foursquare or Queen Anne could be had on your budget. If you're willing to put in some serious sweat equity, you might be able to find a large-ish Victorian in Congress Park or Cheesman Park for around that price.

As it turns out, most of Denver's suburbs were built out in the post-war era, so you're unlikely to find what you're looking for in Denver's suburbs, like you might in the older suburbs of an east coast city. Parts of Englewood, Littleton, Golden, Arvada, etc do have a few blocks of historic homes, each. So, that might be worth checking into as well. However, most of what you're looking for is going to be within a 5 mile radius of downtown Denver.

Best plan is to tour the various neighborhoods and discover what you're looking for. There's a LOT of neighborhoods out there so I think you'll find what you're looking for.
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,033 posts, read 98,948,726 times
Reputation: 31502
I would add that Arvada, while having an older area, is also rather middle-class, at least in Old Town. The houses look like those in Wash Park, just a different setting. Same for Sloan's Lake in Denver.
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Old 07-15-2007, 01:37 PM
 
8 posts, read 17,452 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks for your responses. We have also been told that Platte Park and Harvard Gulch might fit what we're looking for. In terms of suburbs, Louisville sounds nice, too, though I fear that the commute to downtown might be a little much (more than 30 minutes?).
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