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Old 08-12-2008, 12:27 PM
 
Location: San Ramon Ca
34 posts, read 75,261 times
Reputation: 17
Default Colorado winters.

On average how many days in the winter do you not make it to work because of weather conditions? When it is snowing do you just leave a half hour early and drive accordingly? I have done plenty of snow driving on vacations skiing but I have never lived in show country. Yes I do know that 4 wheel drive is not 4 wheel stop.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:19 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,283 posts, read 54,864,175 times
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Where are you thinking of living? In the metro Denver area, the usual # of snow days is zero. There were years when my kids didn't even have a snow day off school. Then along will come a winter where you have several.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:42 PM
 
2,118 posts, read 3,150,885 times
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Wink Snow days

It would depend on your route. Even in the mountains, with lots of snow, someplace such as Summit County, you might never have an excuse not to show for work. If, however, you depended on I-70 between there and Denver, CO, you could count on inconvenient road closures at times. Some of the higher passes will suffer occasional closures as well. Out on the eastern plains there are occasional closures of I-70 and other roads, and other days, road closure or not, you sure wouldn't want to be driving.

Winter before last, in the aftermath of the big storm, it was bemusing to notice how little it affected some mountain communities yet left many secondary city streets in places such as Longmont, CO quite challenging, a veritable sea of packed snow and resultant pot holes. Some people then would have got to work just fine, if only they could get out of their driveway and to the end of the block.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:51 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 6,799,554 times
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We've lived here for two years, and my spouse worked from home one day during the interminable blizzards of winter 2006-07. Depending on your job requirements, just leave a little early or wait a couple hours for the road crews to do their job. Unless you live out in the middle of nowhere, four-wheel drive is generally unnecessary, although it's a nice luxury if you can afford it. We do occasionally have weather-related highway closures, but they are typically short-lived. For more information about Colorado winters, read the Colorado Weather thread.
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Old 08-12-2008, 02:26 PM
 
Location: 80919 Rockrimmon yO!
2,738 posts, read 4,355,457 times
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There's no reason at all that you shouldn't be able to make it to work, unless it snows so badly that you can't see your car anymore.

I doubt that will happen very often, but, and this is just my honest opinion,
If you live in Colorado, especially higher elevations, and you don't own anything with either 4 or all wheel drive, You should have your head examined.
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Old 08-12-2008, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
8,460 posts, read 10,824,478 times
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I've been here only one winter so far (last), and from what folks have told me it was pretty average.

The only problem I ran into was being late, and for some bosses, snow is no excuse (surprising to me, a California boy). So make sure you leave in plenty of time to arrive to work on time.

My step-son had no snow-days, but a few snow delays. Folks here are tough, compared to places around the country that close school for one inch.
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Old 08-12-2008, 04:26 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 6,799,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanek9freak View Post
If you live in Colorado, especially higher elevations, and you don't own anything with either 4 or all wheel drive, You should have your head examined.
We made it through winter 06-07 without it. Should I make an appointment to have my head examined?
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Old 08-12-2008, 07:55 PM
 
Location: 80919 Rockrimmon yO!
2,738 posts, read 4,355,457 times
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Well, if you're like me and make occasional trips to the high country, you'd be insane not to own something with 4 wheel drive, and with a winch if you know what's good for you.

I suppose if you just stay in Denver and never venture to the mountains, then yes, a regular car will probably do.

I'd rather stay on the safe side with my truck though, even if we only get a dusting here and there.
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Old 08-12-2008, 07:58 PM
Status: "Corn well over knee high!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
67,283 posts, read 54,864,175 times
Reputation: 18700
I've said this before, but I'll say it again: We lived here 23 years before we bought a 4WD. And we go to the mountains less than we did when we were driving 2WD cars, both FWD and RWD.
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Old 08-12-2008, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,365 posts, read 51,646,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by out of bay or bust View Post
On average how many days in the winter do you not make it to work because of weather conditions? When it is snowing do you just leave a half hour early and drive accordingly? I have done plenty of snow driving on vacations skiing but I have never lived in show country. Yes I do know that 4 wheel drive is not 4 wheel stop.
I lived on the Palmer Divide for two years. The Palmer Divide is one of the snowier areas on the Front Range. In winter 2006-2007, my first in Colorado having moved from Southern California, we had 204 inches of snow. My commute was 38 miles one way to eastern Colorado Springs. In two years I missed exactly one day, and that was in a pretty good snow storm leaving at my normal 5AM.

The posters above are correct. It is unlikely you would miss any days if you are in a metro area. However, there will be many days when you will be driving on ice during early morning drives. That was the scariest thing for me. Doesn't make too much difference what kind of vehicle you drive - you have to drive slow and worry about everyone else who seem to be driving too fast.
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