U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-06-2013, 09:11 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,575,619 times
Reputation: 1883

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
jazzlover wrote: Not surprising, then, that many rural Coloradans often feel alienated, ignored, and "out of place" in a state where they and their families may have lived for generations.

Not surprising at all, and not in any way, shape, or form is this unique to Colorado. In every state with a large metro area, the same split and alienation exists between the rural and metro areas. That's been going on since time immemorial! My home state of PA for example, is said by some to be, Philly in the east, Pittsburgh in the west and Alabama in between. Those who feel out of place in any state are victims of their own attitude of non-acceptance and resistance to the way things are. Not that there is anything wrong with feeling out of place, but anyone who feels like that is doing it to themselves. Blaming the newcomers is simply a lame excuse for not taking care of their own emotional well being.
So CW, sounds like you know something about PA. Lived my entire life there, 36 years in eastern PA and 23 years in western PA. At least until this past monday when I started setting up house in Durango. No furniture yet. Sitting on canvas chairs.... like camping.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-07-2013, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Colorado
90 posts, read 275,774 times
Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoButCounty View Post
... At least until this past monday when I started setting up house in Durango.
Welcome to Colorado.

Durango, huh? You must like living in a "postcard". Gorgeous area!

- KK
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2013, 10:38 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,473,188 times
Reputation: 18835
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoButCounty View Post
So CW, sounds like you know something about PA. Lived my entire life there, 36 years in eastern PA and 23 years in western PA. At least until this past monday when I started setting up house in Durango. No furniture yet. Sitting on canvas chairs.... like camping.
I'll look forward to hearing about your experiences in your new home!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2013, 12:16 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,197 times
Reputation: 29
I read through all the replies. It's interesting that a lot of people living here don't Know the difference between eastern slope vs. Western slope. I moved to Colorado by choice when I was 19 from a sweedish farm town an hour outside the twin cities. I work in Colorado Springs everyday and have since '98. I am a door to door salesman. I own my own security company and have been very successful with my business. I consider myself a Libertarian and have some very Conservative view points, so I fit in well in the Colorado Springs area. I have to be honest though and say that while I get along with my clients I do not like living in a military area. Colorado Springs is probably as much a melting pot as New York City minus some of the colored folk. There really isn't a prodominant culture (western culture is long gone). I find people to be nosey and somewhat unfriendly or unwilling to get to know other people (hermits). I live in Woodland Park because I absolutely refuse to live in a relatively crowded big city 600,000 people. I really don't anywhere east of the divide that includes Buena Vista and Salida and Woodland Park. It is so much greener and prettier west of the divide. They get way more moisture and a lot less wind. When you cross west of the divide it get's greener immediately do to weather patterns. The people east of the divide are generally less friendly ,and a large percentage of them are city people. The biggest draw that Colorado had for me was the hunting opportunities. So naturally since the eastern slope has a lot less deer elk and wildlife in general because of the lack of moisture and the number of people I prefer the western slope 10 to 1. Of all the replies i think Jazz Lover knows Colorado more then anyone else on this thread.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2013, 05:34 PM
 
9,816 posts, read 19,017,909 times
Reputation: 7537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Will View Post
Of all the replies i think Jazz Lover knows Colorado more then anyone else on this thread.
True, he's a living legend of Colorado folklore, history, politics, geography, culture and everything else Colorado.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2013, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
Colorado Will wrote: Of all the replies i think Jazz Lover knows Colorado more then anyone else on this thread.

Jazzlover is a living encyclopedia ( anybody remember those? ) on everything Colorado.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 07:08 PM
 
68 posts, read 143,708 times
Reputation: 107
Default Moisture East and West

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Will View Post
I read through all the replies. It's interesting that a lot of people living here don't Know the difference between eastern slope vs. Western slope. I moved to Colorado by choice when I was 19 from a sweedish farm town an hour outside the twin cities. I work in Colorado Springs everyday and have since '98. I am a door to door salesman. I own my own security company and have been very successful with my business. I consider myself a Libertarian and have some very Conservative view points, so I fit in well in the Colorado Springs area. I have to be honest though and say that while I get along with my clients I do not like living in a military area. Colorado Springs is probably as much a melting pot as New York City minus some of the colored folk. There really isn't a prodominant culture (western culture is long gone). I find people to be nosey and somewhat unfriendly or unwilling to get to know other people (hermits). I live in Woodland Park because I absolutely refuse to live in a relatively crowded big city 600,000 people. I really don't anywhere east of the divide that includes Buena Vista and Salida and Woodland Park. It is so much greener and prettier west of the divide. They get way more moisture and a lot less wind. When you cross west of the divide it get's greener immediately do to weather patterns. The people east of the divide are generally less friendly ,and a large percentage of them are city people. The biggest draw that Colorado had for me was the hunting opportunities. So naturally since the eastern slope has a lot less deer elk and wildlife in general because of the lack of moisture and the number of people I prefer the western slope 10 to 1. Of all the replies i think Jazz Lover knows Colorado more then anyone else on this thread.
Agreed, Jazz is the best. I sometimes wish I could cook him a steak and pour him a beer to thank him and learn even more in person. I would argue until I die that there are some areas EAST of The DIVIDE that have exceptionally green and moist climates on most years, it just depends on which season you are looking at. I can count many times that in July there were flowers blooming and green grasses waiving from La Veta to Evergreen and everywhere all around and in between with showers and thunderstorms afoot everywhere, yet when you blew out of Leadville down into Vail country it was drier than a popcorn fart for lack of a better term. Light a match! This was even on some relatively "normal" years (not 2000-2002 or the summer of 2012). I find much of the Western Slope below 7000 feet to be extremely seasonal in its weather patterns and would argue that getting the bulk of your moisture in the winter is not all it's cracked up to be. I personally prefer the drier, sunnier weather with less prolonged snow cover, with the usual monsoon and other patterns in off months to make up for the lack of dead winter snowfall. I do not mind less snow with even more sun all winter, with a few Spring poundings of the whote stuff that is flat gone in a couple of days. I do not prefer Western Slope clay which of course turns to ridiculous mud come March and April. I really like wild flowers that have just enough moisture to get going in the Spring, yet are still there in July and August. Hell, Rifle, CO will be beautiful for April and May but will be mostly yellow come late June. I find La Veta, Westcliffe, Salida, Buena, Woodland Park, Evergreen, and the like to be a much more agreeable climates in terms of overall cabin fever factor. Spring in CO just plain stinks all over as mentioned many a time on here. Today it blew and blew. I live in a relatively low-lying Western Valley, however you cannot escape this in March and April. Sunshine, not being knee deep in snow, and a good monsoon make it for some of us
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
^^^^The wind takes some of the pleasure out of hiking on an otherwise sunny, delightful 60 degree day....especially if you are walking into it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 10:12 PM
 
1 posts, read 604 times
Reputation: 11
I totally agree with what you are saying, COflower, as I live in Junction and grew up here. I've been to Denver a few times and I just didn't like it. Too much traffic, too many buildings (in the parts I've visited) and just not quite the same feel. It feels like in Junction and into Fruita you can really breath in the fresh air and not feel suffocated. You can see every sunrise and sunset, and when it rains (though it does so rarely, but just enough) you can almost see how it cleans everything. I think that people who enjoy the rush a big city can bring would enjoy Denver, but the people who just want to stop and smell the roses and enjoy the little things in life, would like towns like Junction or Fruita.
Just my opinion, not a fact that was stated by researchers at Harvard or whatever. If you disagree, don't get all offended.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2017, 07:41 AM
 
7,046 posts, read 15,987,444 times
Reputation: 4408
IMO, anyone who is still working, and wants a descent salary, should live on the Eastern Slope aka Front Range. Denver metro and possibly the Springs. However, there are smaller populations/less traffic in some parts of the Front Range, as in Loveland........compared to Denver area or where we currently live in northeastern Florida w/a population of over 850k. We lived on the Eastern Slope/Front Range for 5 1/2 years and plan on moving back.

For those that are retired, or going to be retired, I'd think either side would be fine, but the really "needed" things (shopping, medical care, entertainment) would be on the Eastern Slope/Front Range.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top