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Old 04-18-2007, 07:47 AM
 
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The school with the highest test scores in Colorado is Ridgeview Classical in Fort Collins. They offer a K-12 program. Colorado State University is also located there. Fort Collins is not a large metropolitan area like Denver, but the area is growing very rapidly.
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Old 04-18-2007, 09:47 PM
 
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What about the low-economic and low-score schools?? That is where they REALLY need good teachers. Not just the "high-end" upper-class, suburban areas.

It seems as though all the teachers want to teach in suburban areas with the middle and upper class students. Nobody here wants to teach in the poor areas. Don't the kids there need good teachers?
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Old 04-19-2007, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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In my years of teaching in California, some of my most rewarding experiences were when I taught at a very low-socioeconomic school that was largely hispanic. Although most of the parents couldn't communicate well with me, it was obvious how much they appreciated everything that our school was providing for their children. Their gestures, somewhat "cheesy" gifts from Tijuana (as in a large, avocado glossy-painted unicorn), and many "Gracias" were more than I can say for some of the white parents. If there's one thing I can't stand--it's parents who breathe down the teacher's neck, demanding one thing after the next for their "do -no-wrong" little "angels". By the way--I'm caucasian and mean no offense to any particular ethnic group--just relaying the overall feeling I've experienced in working with both types of parents (gracious and demanding).
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Old 04-19-2007, 05:12 PM
 
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I hear ya girl!,,,I live in southern california and too have experienced the same "breathing down your neck parents".
Moderator cut: offensive
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Old 04-20-2007, 10:38 PM
 
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So, what areas would be good for a teacher who is bi-lingual and wants to teach Spanish to those children who are not well off? I want to STAY AWAY from snooty rich suburban parents who think there kid never does anything wrong...

K-4

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Old 04-21-2007, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Colorado
346 posts, read 1,417,536 times
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I'm still in California, but hoping to move to Colorado. My uncle (now retired) spent many years as a psychologist working for the Aurora Public schools. I know Aurora has a bad reputation, but from what I've seen, it's mainly regular folks--no snootiness that I've heard of. There is a growing hispanic population in the northern, older parts of Aurora. My uncle's grandkids all go to Aurora schools, and although the schools rate low according to www.greatschools.net, all of his grandkids are in some sort of GATE program and doing well. So it sounds to me that they work hard to meet the needs of their diverse population. I have also heard that Adams-12 and parts of Boulder (Lafayette) would be good places for bilingual teachers. Littleton Public Schools has an excellent reputation as well, but not sure about the bilingual aspect. You mentioned that you want to teach Spanish. Being a teacher from California, where so many kids come in not knowing English, our goal has always been to develop literacy in English--along with support in their primary language. Not sure what Colorado focuses on in that regard. Good luck! If and when we ever make it out there, I'll be searching for something as well. We like the Parker area, but not sure about the "primarily white, possibly snobby" parents. I hope this is not the case, but will continue researching and visiting until we figure it out. We like Centennial too, which seems to be a little more middle-class. It's weird because the homes in Centennial are older but generally more expensive than the Parker homes. Kind of makes me wonder. . .sorry to get off topic here.

Last edited by rebagirl; 04-21-2007 at 11:43 AM.. Reason: added content
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