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Old 02-21-2007, 05:46 AM
 
44 posts, read 146,999 times
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Nadine, do you have all the equipment required to grow hay or do you rent the equipment from a neighbor. Here in MI we have lots of hay fields and great neighbors, who'll come cut and bale our hay for a $1 a bale. There is so much we have farmers who donate extra fields to us (True Vine Equestrian Center is a non for profit therapy riding center). Clearly, we are a different environment with different problems. I would imagine this feeding issue transfers also to higher boarding fees too. I know my father in-law (up on snowmass) has a mudd season. I'm guessing you do not?

We just took the horses out yesterday, for a ride. We need to get them ready for the riding season. After not being ridden for 6 weeks (while we were in a deep freeze) they can be a little silly and need to learn their manners again But, with our thaw MUDD is so BAD! I'm praying for a dryer spring. It's not uncommon here to see rain everyday for a month in the spring. It's sooooo depressing. And our poor horses, they are so happy to go for ride with us just to get out of those muddy paddocks!
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Old 02-21-2007, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,500,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine D View Post
Nadine, do you have all the equipment required to grow hay or do you rent the equipment from a neighbor. Here in MI we have lots of hay fields and great neighbors, who'll come cut and bale our hay for a $1 a bale. There is so much we have farmers who donate extra fields to us (True Vine Equestrian Center is a non for profit therapy riding center). Clearly, we are a different environment with different problems. I would imagine this feeding issue transfers also to higher boarding fees too. I know my father in-law (up on snowmass) has a mudd season. I'm guessing you do not?

We just took the horses out yesterday, for a ride. We need to get them ready for the riding season. After not being ridden for 6 weeks (while we were in a deep freeze) they can be a little silly and need to learn their manners again But, with our thaw MUDD is so BAD! I'm praying for a dryer spring. It's not uncommon here to see rain everyday for a month in the spring. It's sooooo depressing. And our poor horses, they are so happy to go for ride with us just to get out of those muddy paddocks!
No I do not have equipment nor do I rent. There are hayers that we hire to do it for us. Wish I could get done for a dollar. More like 2.50 a bale.

Mud is not an issue much here. Corral get muddy some. I need to get somemore sand in there. But never to the point that my horses have ever had hoof rot.

I finally remembered to check private messages and I did leave one for you too.
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Old 02-21-2007, 11:56 AM
 
44 posts, read 146,999 times
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Hi I_LUVNM, We are now seriously thinking about the Durango area, along with Cortez, Grand Junction, Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, Salida. We had orginally thought Fort Collins, so we purchased plane tickets into Denver for next week. We will only be there 3 days. So, we'll still look at the greater Fort Collins area for an afternoon and then shoot down to CO Springs area and maybe on the last day Glenwood Springs. I want to go back in June, when our 11 yr. old daughter is out of school and shoot down to Durango and then up to GJ.

I've been seeing on this forum that people don't like Cortez. What is your opinion on this area? Am I waisting my time? Do you know of any equine subdivision in Durango?

Where is the best place to fly into? and....one last question....for now anyway How far a drive from Albuquerque?

I really appreciate any insite, since you seem to know the area so well!

Thanks,
Catherine D
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Old 02-21-2007, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
210 posts, read 1,242,722 times
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Catherine, you can fly directly into Cortez, or you could look at flying into Durango or Farmington (there are daily nonstop flights from Denver to each of these). I just did a quick search and I found the cheapest airline tickets were into Cortez, but it probably depends on when you're planning on flying. Albuquerque is about 5 hours' drive from Cortez.
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Old 02-21-2007, 10:32 PM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine D View Post
Hi I_LUVNM, We are now seriously thinking about the Durango area, along with Cortez, Grand Junction, Glenwood Springs, Carbondale, Salida. We had orginally thought Fort Collins, so we purchased plane tickets into Denver for next week. We will only be there 3 days. So, we'll still look at the greater Fort Collins area for an afternoon and then shoot down to CO Springs area and maybe on the last day Glenwood Springs. I want to go back in June, when our 11 yr. old daughter is out of school and shoot down to Durango and then up to GJ.

I've been seeing on this forum that people don't like Cortez. What is your opinion on this area? Am I waisting my time? Do you know of any equine subdivision in Durango?

Where is the best place to fly into? and....one last question....for now anyway How far a drive from Albuquerque?

I really appreciate any insite, since you seem to know the area so well!

Thanks,
Catherine D
Hi Catherine. Since they built a four lane highway all through New Mexico with 70 mph limit now, Albuquerque to Durango is now about 3 1/2 hour drive. 3 hours from Farmington to Albuquerque. About Cortez, it is a laid back, casual western town. Slow and easy. It would get on some hurried persons last nerve to live there, so not many people like the cowpoke kind of town. Major activities would be the county fair, rodeos, etc. It has mostly conservative ranchers and farmers. A liberal person would feel much better in Durango. There are places in the Cortez area with horses. River Mountain comes to mind. You can google more info by typing in Cortez Rivermountain where they also show pictures of the Cortez area so you can see if you like it or not. New subdivision going along the West Fork of the Dolores River and Fish Creek too. Prices for land and homes are much cheaper than Durango. They are building a new subdivision in Cortez called Rodeo but I dont know if they will have horses or not, with that name, it should though! Durango does have equine subs. One comes to mind is River Valley. Google RiverValleyEstates Durango for more on that.
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Old 02-23-2007, 01:39 PM
 
5 posts, read 22,235 times
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Default Land for horses in Colorado

You've gotten alot of information, some of it good, some not so good. Land in Colorado is more expensive the closer you get to Denver or to the ski resort towns. Much of Colorado is still agriculture land, and you can buy excellent land for less money the farther away you get from the tourist spots and from Denver.

Alamosa is an up and coming small town located in the southern part of the state. I like Alamosa and bought here in 2005. I bought some land down in San Luis, closer to the border with New Mexico, but that land is virtually undevelopable because the local power company won't run enough lines to that area. So, I bought in Alamosa and I have 10.76 acres which I am about to build on.

I raise horses, so I can tell you that if you're looking for grassland, then this area would be too arid for you, unless you irrigate. The farther north you go in Colorado, the greener it is. So, if you're looking for grassland, go east into the plains or north along I-25.

Durango is gorgeous, trendy and fun, but expensive as hell. Cortez, a scant 30 minutes west of Durango is cowboy country, green high grass and a true western atmosphere. I was going to buy in Cortez, but Alamosa has more economy and a university. Cortez is great grass country for horses. Oddly enough, when you drop out of the valley, you're back in desert.

The best advise is to go to Colorado and drive around -- alot. You'll figure out the terrain. Don't listen to brokers. They'll tell you anything to sell you land.
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Old 02-23-2007, 04:52 PM
 
44 posts, read 146,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alamosa cowboy View Post
You've gotten alot of information, some of it good, some not so good. Land in Colorado is more expensive the closer you get to Denver or to the ski resort towns. Much of Colorado is still agriculture land, and you can buy excellent land for less money the farther away you get from the tourist spots and from Denver.

Alamosa is an up and coming small town located in the southern part of the state. I like Alamosa and bought here in 2005. I bought some land down in San Luis, closer to the border with New Mexico, but that land is virtually undevelopable because the local power company won't run enough lines to that area. So, I bought in Alamosa and I have 10.76 acres which I am about to build on.

I raise horses, so I can tell you that if you're looking for grassland, then this area would be too arid for you, unless you irrigate. The farther north you go in Colorado, the greener it is. So, if you're looking for grassland, go east into the plains or north along I-25.

Durango is gorgeous, trendy and fun, but expensive as hell. Cortez, a scant 30 minutes west of Durango is cowboy country, green high grass and a true western atmosphere. I was going to buy in Cortez, but Alamosa has more economy and a university. Cortez is great grass country for horses. Oddly enough, when you drop out of the valley, you're back in desert.

The best advise is to go to Colorado and drive around -- alot. You'll figure out the terrain. Don't listen to brokers. They'll tell you anything to sell you land.

Alamosa Cowboy, thanks for the advice we may be in your neck of the woods next week. Doing just as you suggested, a lot of driving around. Then we'll be back in June to do the same thing.

What kind of horses do your raise?

Everything will be new for us....Colorado....and keeping our own horses with us instead of boarding. I can't wait to realize the dream!

thanks again, we'll be taking a look at Cortez too! Saw some equine subdivisions. Any advice on that versus our own land by ourselves?

Have a good one!
Catherine
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Old 02-24-2007, 03:52 AM
 
11 posts, read 51,271 times
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OKay, I'm hearing all about folks talking about irrigating and things are changing rapidly on that front. Water rights will be increasing in cost roughly 100% a year (the water rights auction in GJ increased 300% in 2 years), it won't be worth the trouble trying to find a area where you are in close location to a ditch or canal (besides that is only along the Colorado anyway).

Decent hay and alfalfa can still be had for $4-6 a bale and I expect that round bales will be back down to $125-150 next year. You won't be wanting to ride your horses on your own land, you'll be wanting to either get up in the high country or down in the canyons, so you don't need to buy a 40, you can easily get by on 2 acres and keep em' corraled and trailer them to whereever you want to go.

If you buy 40 acres, you better get the mineral rights if you can. So expect to pay anywhere from $20-$1000/acre for them depending on location. Most likely some company already owns them or the BLM does. So you better check out that situation fast if you are planning on living outside of an incorporated town anywhere on the west slope.

That all said, if you want to live on the west slope of Colorado, I would recommend Palisade. It's a nice town, short trip to the Bookcliffs and Grand Mesa and 15 minutes from downtown Grand Junction. Otherwise I think the Front Range would work best for you.
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Old 02-24-2007, 04:30 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine D View Post
we'll be taking a look at Cortez too! Saw some equine subdivisions. Any advice on that versus our own land by ourselves?

Have a good one!
Catherine


Catherine, in Colorado, be sure and ask about any covenants. I would get it in writing. Some subdivisions are easy, some are not. Covenants can be nice, like someone cant go junking up their property next to yours or move a ton of cows next door or a pig farm, but also the other end is say you want to build a barn, you might have to get approval. Things like that. As opposed to your own land out in a rural area where you have more freedom but also can have the pig farm move in next door. A coin with both sides!
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Old 02-24-2007, 09:41 AM
 
4 posts, read 17,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine D View Post
my husband and i are looking to purchase some land in CO (around 30 to 40 acres). we have been looking at the greater Fort Collins, Loveland area or Colorado Springs, even Grand Junction. Weather is important to us. We live in MI now and want more sun and milder temps. My father in-law lives in Aspen. it's beautiful, but the winters are too long. We bought a lot in Carbondale and then sold it 2 years later with a nice profit. We are thinking of building and moving in 6 years when our youngest goes to college. We will be heading out the first week in March to look at some ranches in Fort Collins. We also want to know that good health care is near by and some access to shopping etc. any opinions?
We are purchasing a piece of property in Rye. That's located 25 miles south of Pueblo. Hatchet Ranch is close to there with lots of larger parcels at great prices. This area is wonderful! Small community, large parcels of land, great views of mountains or plains. Milder temperatures. What sold us on the area is the friendliness of the community. They are willing to help out if in time of need, and it's tucked away and not "discovered" yet. Although Pueblo has health facilities, etc. Check into the area... [mod cut]

Last edited by Mike from back east; 02-24-2007 at 09:58 AM.. Reason: Cannot post contact data for realtors - its considered advertising, isn't permitted.
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