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Old 03-23-2007, 09:47 PM
 
49 posts, read 212,955 times
Reputation: 23

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What does this mean? Where may this be? Advantages....disadvantages? Water right?
Considering to visit colorado Springs area late april. Considering to relocate into wooded area with some acreage. I have been on these threads and read something about the banana belt. Also, any suggestions of areas to visit with wooded acreage available either west of Colorado Springs or below Pueblo, west of Pueblo. How is Southern Colorado? Afforadable acreage? Any wooded areas?
Trinidad area? What about west of Trinidad? In for a 3 day trip, short but want to get idea of area to entertain a realtor later to narrow search. Then return to area. Any price comparison ideas?
Climate?
Growth in population camparison?
Just another Californian wanting a bette life,
Thanks.....
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Old 03-24-2007, 01:11 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,116 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by frcal View Post
What does this mean? Where may this be? Advantages....disadvantages? Water right?
Considering to visit colorado Springs area late april. Considering to relocate into wooded area with some acreage. I have been on these threads and read something about the banana belt. Also, any suggestions of areas to visit with wooded acreage available either west of Colorado Springs or below Pueblo, west of Pueblo. How is Southern Colorado? Afforadable acreage? Any wooded areas?
Trinidad area? What about west of Trinidad? In for a 3 day trip, short but want to get idea of area to entertain a realtor later to narrow search. Then return to area. Any price comparison ideas?
Climate?
Growth in population camparison?
Just another Californian wanting a bette life,
Thanks.....
Banana belt is an expression used to mean a warmer area. It doesnt mean you can grow bananas there but since bananas like a warm climate, that is probably where it gained meaning. The warmest area or "banana belt" in Colorado is the Grand Junction area. Southern Colorado has warmer areas like Cortez. Durango, south of there toward the NM border gets warmer. Some southern areas are not warmer but colder like Alamosa and Gunnison. Pueblo is somewhat warmer and deserty like Grand Junction. Areas with pines but warmer, there are some and I am sure some people will post those. Some I know are up toward Grand Mesa near Delta, Ticolote near Durango has pines but is not bad in the winter. About Colorado Springs, there are nice wooded areas like Woodland Park but I dont know how the winters are there, Mike from Back East is real knowledgeable on that area so you might go on the Colorado Springs forum and ask him on that area. Trinidad? I dont know much about it. It is pretty small. If you have to have a job you will be limited in Trinidad.
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Old 03-25-2007, 08:35 AM
 
2 posts, read 26,767 times
Reputation: 10
Cool Hello California

I'm in Pueblo, 45 min. south of Colorado Springs (C.S.). We are 20 mins from a great little town called Beulah, and 45 mins from Rye and Westcliffe. All of these areas are beautiful and have great fishing, hiking and camping. The outdoor season here is very long. You can usually be outside without a jacket from end of Feb. (not this year its been very wet year) to Oct. As the other guy said, work in some of the southern areas is thin. Pueblo is about 120k (the info on City Data is a bit off) with a lot of new business moving in all the time and is a city with alot of hidden treasures. Springs (as we call Colorado Springs here) is a bigger city (5X). Its a nice place, I like it, but also has terrible traffic (none here) and housing and living is a lot more expensive. They are closer to Woodland Park, Divide and Florisant which are all nice areas. Cripple Creek is within reach from either town and has gambling which is always fun.

Good luck.
Aaron

Last edited by Yorkie_Mom; 03-25-2007 at 01:28 PM.. Reason: No advertising,please read the forum rules. Thanks!!!
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Old 03-25-2007, 10:40 AM
 
10,868 posts, read 41,128,193 times
Reputation: 14009
You will find that many Colorado locales will have a lot of "micro climate" areas. Some are large enough to be called a "banana belt", and yet may be only a mile or a few square miles surrounded by much larger prevailing wetter/colder areas.

This condition is due to the wind shadow effects from the surrounding mountains in the prevailing wind directions which cause upslope and downslope winds that can divert prevailing moisture sources away from a site.

You can see this on a very detailed radar view on weather maps, or from a light aircraft flying along the foothills or in the mountains during "stormy weather" in the region. It's not uncommon to have one valley area "socked in" with severe moisture/storm and the next ridge over be completely clear, allowing you to proceed in VFR conditions to your destination.

The effect will happen many miles away from the mountains, too. We lived by CR5 & Hwy 52 by Erie and had minimal snowfall around us. But just a few miles away it could be much much more snow in a typical storm.

The good news is that you'll experience less snowfall. The bad news is that you'll need to water your landscaping a lot more to keep it going, or xeriscape your yard for minimal water use.
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Old 03-25-2007, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,499,884 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by I_LUVNM View Post
Banana belt is an expression used to mean a warmer area. It doesnt mean you can grow bananas there but since bananas like a warm climate, that is probably where it gained meaning. The warmest area or "banana belt" in Colorado is the Grand Junction area. Southern Colorado has warmer areas like Cortez. Durango, south of there toward the NM border gets warmer. Some southern areas are not warmer but colder like Alamosa and Gunnison. Pueblo is somewhat warmer and deserty like Grand Junction. Areas with pines but warmer, there are some and I am sure some people will post those. Some I know are up toward Grand Mesa near Delta, Ticolote near Durango has pines but is not bad in the winter. About Colorado Springs, there are nice wooded areas like Woodland Park but I dont know how the winters are there, Mike from Back East is real knowledgeable on that area so you might go on the Colorado Springs forum and ask him on that area. Trinidad? I dont know much about it. It is pretty small. If you have to have a job you will be limited in Trinidad.
YOU MISSED A FEW THAT CLAIM THE NAME. Canon City is warmer in the winter that most that claim it. Why??? because we are protected by mts or hills on all sides. Actually Canon claims the Climate Capital of Colorado. We set under 6000 ft.Our summers are not a hot either usually but of coarse some-days yes and some-days no---
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Old 03-25-2007, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,499,884 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by frcal View Post
What does this mean? Where may this be? Advantages....disadvantages? Water right?
Considering to visit colorado Springs area late april. Considering to relocate into wooded area with some acreage. I have been on these threads and read something about the banana belt. Also, any suggestions of areas to visit with wooded acreage available either west of Colorado Springs or below Pueblo, west of Pueblo. How is Southern Colorado? Afforadable acreage? Any wooded areas?
Trinidad area? What about west of Trinidad? In for a 3 day trip, short but want to get idea of area to entertain a realtor later to narrow search. Then return to area. Any price comparison ideas?
Climate?
Growth in population camparison?
Just another Californian wanting a bette life,
Thanks.....
I am not real sure what a wooded area means to a Californian but wooded areas in Colorado would have to mean headed for the mountains. Quakies (aspen) Jack Pine (Ponderosa Pine) will be native at the lowest altitudes. The other pines and spruces will be higher. We are an semi-arid state and other than waterways or where some water collects or maybe a spring, you will not find woods on the plains areas. On waterways there will be a narrow wooded area. Not pine but lots of Cottonwoods. Hope that makes sense to you.
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Old 03-25-2007, 11:49 AM
 
5 posts, read 38,230 times
Reputation: 11
Grand Junction is considered a "Banana Belt" due to our mild winters - less snow and warmer daytime temperatures than many parts of our state. But, there are many nights in the winter and quite a few days that it is colder here than it is in Anchorage, Alaska!

Our area used to be "cheaper" to live in, but due to the gas well industry in Garfield county that has rapidly changed. Houses that cost 200K just two years ago are now listing for 325K and up.
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Old 03-25-2007, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,499,884 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
You will find that many Colorado locales will have a lot of "micro climate" areas. Some are large enough to be called a "banana belt", and yet may be only a mile or a few square miles surrounded by much larger prevailing wetter/colder areas.

This condition is due to the wind shadow effects from the surrounding mountains in the prevailing wind directions which cause upslope and downslope winds that can divert prevailing moisture sources away from a site.

You can see this on a very detailed radar view on weather maps, or from a light aircraft flying along the foothills or in the mountains during "stormy weather" in the region. It's not uncommon to have one valley area "socked in" with severe moisture/storm and the next ridge over be completely clear, allowing you to proceed in VFR conditions to your destination.

The effect will happen many miles away from the mountains, too. We lived by CR5 & Hwy 52 by Erie and had minimal snowfall around us. But just a few miles away it could be much much more snow in a typical storm.

The good news is that you'll experience less snowfall. The bad news is that you'll need to water your landscaping a lot more to keep it going, or xeriscape your yard for minimal water use.
I am not saying you are wrong about your explanation but there is more.You are mistaken as to having to be far away from the mountains. The mountains can also protect you. Storms hit the San De Cristos, then the Wet Mts. go over the top of us because we are backed right up against. Mts from the N & S also. We have some good sized hills on the east about 40 miles east of Pueblo. Our worse storms and wind when we get it sneaks in from the NE. The is a little gap there. Canon City sits in a little ampitheater. From most directions you drop down into. It too is called a banana belt or the Climate Capitol of Colorado.
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Old 03-25-2007, 06:38 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,511,378 times
Reputation: 1457
There are several "banana belt" areas, like most have already mentioned -- grand junction/fruita on the western slope and Canon City/Florence on the east.

However, the banana belts in both cases are "banana belts" due to their relatively low elevations and the fact that in both cases you are protected from storms by mountains -- this means those places are going to have much less precipitation due to the effects of orthographic lift. Which means few natural trees in such areas, which depend on higher precipitation for their moisture.

So, the bottom line is that what you're looking for doesn't exist -- if you want to be in the foothills with old-growth evergreens, then you'll have to live somewhere that's more exposed to precipitation and so not a banana belt.
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Old 03-25-2007, 11:55 PM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,116 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nadine View Post
YOU MISSED A FEW THAT CLAIM THE NAME. Canon City is warmer in the winter that most that claim it. Why??? because we are protected by mts or hills on all sides. Actually Canon claims the Climate Capital of Colorado. We set under 6000 ft.Our summers are not a hot either usually but of coarse some-days yes and some-days no---
Hi Nadine. I have never been to Canon City but have heard it is near Royal Gorge so since I dont know the area, didnt mention it. I do know several areas in Colorado have micro climates being warmer than areas around it. I hope to visit there some day. I definitely want to see that bridge - awesome looking!
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