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Old 03-28-2007, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,500,615 times
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Hey guys, If you want trees ---plant them! NF gives away trees every yr. This is Colorado. This is what the land is. This is what the climate is. If you want more trees----------
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Old 03-28-2007, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
739 posts, read 2,675,981 times
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There are lots of trees (planted by man) in Denver's old neighborhoods- Park Hill, Country Club, Wash Park,etc- filled with canopied tree streets. I live here b/c it reminds me of the east coast neighborhoods with all the trees and green. So come up here and check us out. Also Mayor Hickenlooper has a huge initiative to plant more trees in certain neighborhoods and city is giving them away for free so there is an effort underway to continue to enhance our neighborhoods with trees!
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Old 03-28-2007, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,312 posts, read 6,742,075 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
You misunderstand me. I wasn't saying the high plains had trees. They WERE beautiful even without trees (except riparian ones). I was saying that their native flora was incredibly beautiful before we busted the sod and the top 5 feet of topsoil blew away. It's hard to find native prairie anywhere except for in a few protected natural grassland.
I hadn't even read your original comment. I was just replying to the OP about her concerns about the treeless nature of our area.

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Old 03-28-2007, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
3,940 posts, read 13,067,746 times
Reputation: 2200
Default Trees

If you like trees why did you move to the Great Plains? Stay in the Pacific Northwest! Haha!
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Old 03-28-2007, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Old Forge, NY
585 posts, read 1,950,091 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by tfox View Post
You misunderstand me. I wasn't saying the high plains had trees. They WERE beautiful even without trees (except riparian ones). I was saying that their native flora was incredibly beautiful before we busted the sod and the top 5 feet of topsoil blew away. It's hard to find native prairie anywhere except for in a few protected natural grassland.
Like Pawnee Grasslands or something even more protected? I don't think all of the land was busted for sod, I believe most of it was used for grazing. Grazing causes it's damage too though.

It's a shortgrass prairie out here. For my taste, the mixed grass and tall grass prairies in states like Nebraska are waaaaay prettier.
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Old 03-29-2007, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,500,615 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumblebelly View Post
Like Pawnee Grasslands or something even more protected? I don't think all of the land was busted for sod, I believe most of it was used for grazing. Grazing causes it's damage too though.

It's a shortgrass prairie out here. For my taste, the mixed grass and tall grass prairies in states like Nebraska are waaaaay prettier.
It is a misconseption that grazing causes damage. OVER GRAZING does. The land around Castle Rock was ranch land. Prime cattle grazing because it did NOT have trees to shade or stop what moisture there is to hit all the ground. Ranchers that are real ranchers(not want-to-bes) take very good care of the land because after all, that is their living. The cattle also fertilize the the land and the hoofs break up the soil so seeds can get hold. Cattle also ate lots of noxious weeds and because of the multi stomachs, kills the seeds such as thistle. And yes the building has hurt land badly. Arroyos that drain water were made by the good Lord and man in their infinite wisdom, fill them in or pipe them so water cannot drain in naturally, pave & concrete everything and water cannot soak into the ground. Then they howl when they are flooded. Sorry guys but man screws up lots of things. Yes me too. No I am not a rancher. But I really feel bad for the farmers and ranchers that are having to sell. They loved the land and took care of it. Some are getting old and their kids are not interested and some just cannot make a living there anymore. And many are losing their water because of the sale of others. When it is all gone. Where do city people think their food is going to come from? Other countries?

Last edited by Nadine; 03-29-2007 at 08:14 AM.. Reason: correction
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Old 03-29-2007, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Avondale, AZ
1,207 posts, read 4,137,849 times
Reputation: 913
We have lots of trees just south of you in Monument .
I agree with you about the medians and other areas. But I can understand the climate does limit the landscaping choices. Pines grow soooo slow.
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Old 03-30-2007, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Old Forge, NY
585 posts, read 1,950,091 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nadine View Post
It is a misconseption that grazing causes damage. OVER GRAZING does. The land around Castle Rock was ranch land. Prime cattle grazing because it did NOT have trees to shade or stop what moisture there is to hit all the ground. Ranchers that are real ranchers(not want-to-bes) take very good care of the land because after all, that is their living. The cattle also fertilize the the land and the hoofs break up the soil so seeds can get hold. Cattle also ate lots of noxious weeds and because of the multi stomachs, kills the seeds such as thistle. And yes the building has hurt land badly. Arroyos that drain water were made by the good Lord and man in their infinite wisdom, fill them in or pipe them so water cannot drain in naturally, pave & concrete everything and water cannot soak into the ground. Then they howl when they are flooded. Sorry guys but man screws up lots of things. Yes me too. No I am not a rancher. But I really feel bad for the farmers and ranchers that are having to sell. They loved the land and took care of it. Some are getting old and their kids are not interested and some just cannot make a living there anymore. And many are losing their water because of the sale of others. When it is all gone. Where do city people think their food is going to come from? Other countries?
Yeah, that's what I was talking about overgrazing. It happens a lot in certain areas. Buffalo are the best grazers, from what I understand.

The water issue is bad in Nebraska too. The Ogallala Aquafer has been steadily dropping due to irrigation. The less water they get from Colo, the more they pump from the Ogallala. But yet people still build houses with kentucky bluegrass lawns in Colorado, something I can't understand.
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Old 03-30-2007, 12:38 PM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,514,509 times
Reputation: 1457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumblebelly View Post
Yeah, that's what I was talking about overgrazing. It happens a lot in certain areas. Buffalo are the best grazers, from what I understand.

The water issue is bad in Nebraska too. The Ogallala Aquafer has been steadily dropping due to irrigation. The less water they get from Colo, the more they pump from the Ogallala. But yet people still build houses with kentucky bluegrass lawns in Colorado, something I can't understand.
Agree, there's some newer drought tolerant hybrid varieties of bluegrass out there now; there's really no excuse for new planting of Kentucky Bluegrass. They should make guidelines on new-construction landscaping to avoid using drought-intolerant lawns.
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Old 03-31-2007, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Colorado
431 posts, read 2,500,615 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumblebelly View Post
Yeah, that's what I was talking about overgrazing. It happens a lot in certain areas. Buffalo are the best grazers, from what I understand.

The water issue is bad in Nebraska too. The Ogallala Aquafer has been steadily dropping due to irrigation. The less water they get from Colo, the more they pump from the Ogallala. But yet people still build houses with kentucky bluegrass lawns in Colorado, something I can't understand.
Us people sure can screw things up can't we? I know how to save water. Go back a few generations and have the outside john and carry buckets of water into the house. Sure makes you use less water. Wonder why no one likes my fix?
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