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Old 03-31-2009, 04:39 PM
 
8 posts, read 20,669 times
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Hello..

I am looking at taking a job in Las Animas, as I am not living in Colorado yet I would like to know what everyone thinks of this area..

Cost of Living?
Best town to live in?
School Systems?
Things to do?

Thanks all!
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:27 AM
 
Location: The 719
10,816 posts, read 18,979,019 times
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Las Animas. I drive through it about twice a month or so. It sits between La Junta and the Hasty area where the access to John Martin Reservoir is. It's in the heart of the Arkansas Valley and not too far from the new site of the historical Bent's Fort of the Santa Fe Trail. It's probably closer to the original Bent's Fort that he blew up so the military couldn't use it.

We have a plethera of info on the area from our new friends that live in La Junta. La Junta Econ Devel should be able to help you with your specific questions. I'd DM him when you get the chance.

Here's a question back at you; where are you coming from and what are you used too? What kind of things do you like to do and are you prepared to be in an extremely rural and agricultural area? How close to a town of 100,000 500,000 and 2.5 million do you want to be?

Check out my pic theads here and some of the pics in the Pueblo/Southern Colorado thread and you'll hopefully learn some of what you need.

I'm also going to refer you to the link for the Colorado subforum created by MFBE here. You should be able to sort through it a bit and find out some stuff.

Unfortunately, we don't have too many posters if any from the Lamar, Las Animas, Rocky Ford, Wiley/McClave, Swink, Manzanola, or Fowler area yet. I'd say there's about 3000 to 5000 or maybe even 8000 residents living in the LA (as in Las Animas!) area now, give or take...
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Old 04-01-2009, 04:55 PM
 
112 posts, read 326,801 times
Reputation: 62
Default Great place

I have owned property in Las Animas county since 1986. You should know enough about it to know that it is "the scruffs". It's not that that is bad but it's not lush like a lot of northern Rockies geography that makes Colorado so postcard attractive.

That said, the land is sitll very reasonable and good deals on houses can be found, mostly because people move in and get bored. This is not a ski area. IT is farming and agricultural, cattle and gas/oil exploration. It used to be a coal mining boom area. Cokedale's aqueducts are still standing.

Trinidad is a great little town with nothing going on except a main street of great preserved architecture from a time that was Bat Masterson's reign as town marshal. There are art galleries and museums of a variety and small local cafes..but nothing of a boutique quality. It is simple life where nobody makes any big money and everybody moves from somewhere else to escape . But it is close to Santa Fe and Taos, Cimmeron and Angel Fire ski resort at Eagle Lake.

Its a great area for fishing, hiking, horseback riding and if you are an artist or photog, there is lots of subject matter.

I love the laid backness of the area and all the little surrounding downs in the backdrop of the Sangre De Cristo Mountains.

I would entertain selling my 35 acres of valley-rdige combination near Weston in a large canyon of blue spruce and and endless quiet..except for a mechanical gas well every so often. I have a gas lease that ammoutns to a pipe running unobtrusively through my property and receive monthly residuals on it.. there is a sawmill down teh road and a general store/gas/post office about 10 miles away on the main highway. The volunteer fire dept. is in Stonewall and a hospital is nearby.

You have a huge National Park..San Isbel...a recreation area at Trinidad Lake (when the water is not sucked dry by farmers who high water rights) ..The purgatory River runs through that area and can be at trickle or at top, depending on winter snowfall.

It's a great area if you wan to be where nothing happens. That is hard to find anymore.

Last edited by atlantis7; 04-01-2009 at 05:17 PM..
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:56 PM
 
Location: The 719
10,816 posts, read 18,979,019 times
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Nice post and everything.

But how did we go off on such a Trinidad tangent?

I still hope we can hear from La Junta Econ Devel...
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Old 04-01-2009, 08:38 PM
 
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atlantis7 confuses Las Animas County (county seat: Trinidad) with the town of Las Animas (which is in Bent County).

There is some info on Las Animas here: Las Animas, Colorado

The lower Arkansas valley, including Las Animas, is not what most people think of when they think "Colorado." The area is out on the plains--hot and dusty in the summer, and cool to cold and dusty in the winter (this area was in the heart of the Dust Bowl in the 1930's). There used to be a lot of irrigated agriculture along the Arkansas River throughout the area. Thanks to the dirty bums in the Front Range cities grabbing most of the water rights over the last 30 years or so to divert water to irrigate Kentucky bluegrass lawns in the suburbs, there is not a whole lot of irrigated land left in the lower Arkansas valley. Dryland farming in the area is and always was pretty marginal, so a lot of the towns in the lower Arkansas valley are now in decline. That's a real tragedy, the area used to be an agricultural powerhouse, and produced large crops of melons and cantaloupes (the best anywhere, in my opinion) every year. Just another example of what arrogant metropolitan "progress" is doing to Colorado.

There are some nice towns in the lower Arkansas valley in Colorado, including Las Animas, but there is no denying that, economically, they are not holding a strong hand these days.
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
11,715 posts, read 18,223,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
atlantis7 confuses las animas county (county seat: Trinidad) with the town of las animas (which is in bent county).

There is some info on las animas here: las animas, colorado

the lower arkansas valley, including las animas, is not what most people think of when they think "colorado." the area is out on the plains--hot and dusty in the summer, and cool to cold and dusty in the winter (this area was in the heart of the dust bowl in the 1930's). There used to be a lot of irrigated agriculture along the arkansas river throughout the area. Thanks to the dirty bums in the front range cities grabbing most of the water rights over the last 30 years or so to divert water to irrigate kentucky bluegrass lawns in the suburbs, there is not a whole lot of irrigated land left in the lower arkansas valley. Dryland farming in the area is and always was pretty marginal, so a lot of the towns in the lower arkansas valley are now in decline. That's a real tragedy, the area used to be an agricultural powerhouse, and produced large crops of melons and cantaloupes (the best anywhere, in my opinion) every year. Just another example of what arrogant metropolitan "progress" is doing to colorado.

There are some nice towns in the lower arkansas valley in colorado, including las animas, but there is no denying that, economically, they are not holding a strong hand these days.
lol
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Old 04-02-2009, 10:08 AM
 
8,322 posts, read 23,114,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
lol
If you happen to think that agriculture is a critical industry to Colorado, which apparently you don't, there is NOTHING funny about this. In fact, most farmers and ranchers that I know have nothing but contempt for what the Front Range cities' water grabs have done to agriculture in this state--even some of those farmers and ranchers who were forced to reluctantly sell their water rights to those cities. So, quit making smiley faces and "LOL's" about it--that is highly offensive to those of us who value the importance of agriculture in this state.
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Old 04-02-2009, 10:14 AM
 
Location: The 719
10,816 posts, read 18,979,019 times
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Easy grizzly. This is the Colorado SE subforum and he has every right in here as someone from Wyoming does.

Good catch on the LA county btw. It was late last night and I missed that.

Ark valley farmers! Whateryagonnadoaboutit?

I know me some Ark valley farmers too! It goes like this;

Their kids don't want to farm no more! So they don't blame them because it's long hours, little pay, little appreciation, and it's getting worse. So the kids want to sell the farm, sell the water, return the farm and/or ranch to original grasslands, move to east of CoSprings and Dever metro to get jobs at the Wal-Mart the the Home-Depot, where they can get their 3000 sq ft house with their kentucky blue grass and their big Maple Trees!

Haven't we covered this already?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzlover
Dryland farming in the area is and always was pretty marginal, so a lot of the towns in the lower arkansas valley are now in decline.
No! The dryland farming goes north of the Ark Valley, like up from Flagler and Seibert, Vona, Stratton, Bethune, Burlington, then down a bit between Burlington (I-70) and Lamar on I think 96 which is First View, Cheyenne Wells, Arapahoe, Chivington, Brandon, Sheridan Lake, Towner, etc. They have dryland farming down there because all they have is some springs, some aquifer action, and God to water their crops. The Ark Valley has the Ark River and Ft. Lyons Canal! Step yer game up!!!!!!!!! And those Dry Land farmers have good old insurance to get by on if they have a bad harvest or no harvest.

Last edited by McGowdog; 04-02-2009 at 10:23 AM..
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Old 04-02-2009, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
11,715 posts, read 18,223,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
If you happen to think that agriculture is a critical industry to Colorado, which apparently you don't, there is NOTHING funny about this. In fact, most farmers and ranchers that I know have nothing but contempt for what the Front Range cities' water grabs have done to agriculture in this state--even some of those farmers and ranchers who were forced to reluctantly sell their water rights to those cities. So, quit making smiley faces and "LOL's" about it--that is highly offensive to those of us who value the importance of agriculture in this state.
I agree with McGowDog, its not like the front range cities are going out there and forcing them to sale, the ones who do not want to sale don't. I do agree that valley water should stay in the valley that is why I would rather see Pueblo buy it then our neighbors to the north.

Most of my generation wants to live in cities like Pueblo and Colorado Springs and Denver not small rural areas. That is why you see so many cities like Pueblo growing.

What would you like to do, have a law that tells them they can't sale their water? So much for property rights.
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Old 04-02-2009, 11:29 AM
 
8,322 posts, read 23,114,769 times
Reputation: 8917
Quote:
Originally Posted by McGowdog View Post
Easy grizzly. This is the Colorado SE subforum and he has every right in here as someone from Wyoming does.

Good catch on the LA county btw. It was late last night and I missed that.

Ark valley farmers! Whateryagonnadoaboutit?

I know me some Ark valley farmers too! It goes like this;

Their kids don't want to farm no more! So they don't blame them because it's long hours, little pay, little appreciation, and it's getting worse. So the kids want to sell the farm, sell the water, return the farm and/or ranch to original grasslands, move to east of CoSprings and Dever metro to get jobs at the Wal-Mart the the Home-Depot, where they can get their 3000 sq ft house with their kentucky blue grass and their big Maple Trees!

Haven't we covered this already?



No! The dryland farming goes north of the Ark Valley, like up from Flagler and Seibert, Vona, Stratton, Bethune, Burlington, then down a bit between Burlington (I-70) and Lamar on I think 96 which is First View, Cheyenne Wells, Arapahoe, Chivington, Brandon, Sheridan Lake, Towner, etc. They have dryland farming down there because all they have is some springs, some aquifer action, and God to water their crops. The Ark Valley has the Ark River and Ft. Lyons Canal! Step yer game up!!!!!!!!! And those Dry Land farmers have good old insurance to get by on if they have a bad harvest or no harvest.
Point is that those small communities in eastern Colorado (even in the lower Ark valley) also rely on dryland farming for economic sustenance. I stand by my comment that dryland farming can be a marginal proposition in eastern Colorado, southeastern Colorado especially, because of the relative frequency of drought. Unlike the dryland farming, irrigated agriculture in the Ark valley was more stable and produced higher dollar crops per acre. If you read the figures from Colorado Agricultural Statistics Service, which I do as part of my work, you can see the precipitous decline of irrigated acreage in the lower Ark valley. That land either goes back to dryland agriculture or it produces nothing at all. Admittedly, farmers can sell their water rights to affluent cities for more money than they can make farming, but that is a legacy of having surplus food production in this country, and cheap fuel to transport food products clear across the nation to feed people. Those two conditions are ending--when they do, it will be interesting to see how Colorado, a state that has squandered a lot of its best ag land to sprawl and water grabs, manages to feed its population. We might just be bulldozing abandoned subdivisions to put land back into food production . . .
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