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Old 03-31-2007, 01:07 PM
 
9 posts, read 32,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I_LUVNM View Post
I like Boulder but then I am a liberal. I dont know how I would feel if I was a conservative there, probably wouldnt like it. Boulder is expensive and really is getting to be a bigger city. It isnt a small city anymore. Durango is like Boulder was in the 70s. I like the smaller community lifestyle Durango has and yet it is open and liberal. The people are friendly and to me Durango is a small Boulder. I also like that Durango is connected to the southwest and you can go into Santa Fe or Albuquerque in a few hours. Durango does get snow but it isnt bad. It melts quickly on the roads and just like this winter it had maybe 4 or 5 inches at most at one time and most of the time it was either sunny or if it did snow was an inch or so and then melt. Nothing bad. I just think though in general if you dont like snow, move to Florida or something and dont move to Colorado. It is the snow that keeps Colorado green. If we didnt have any snow in Colorado then we would look like the Sahara. I love it myself and the four seasons but to each their own.
I am keen on visiting Durango. The idea of a pre-dated/smaller version of Boulder is appealing. I have heard the architecture/city feels very cowboy-like, whatever that might mean.

As for the snow, I have no problem with it. If I didnt want snow I certainly would't be moving to CO. This will be my first time settling into such a cold climate, but I'm looking forward to actually experiencing seasonal change. And I'm definitely eager for the green nature of CO.
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Old 03-31-2007, 01:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
There are a lot of intolerant liberals in Boulder.
This is precisely my concern. I am liberal myself, but intolerance and liberalism do not go together well. It is a contradiction that is hard for me to enjoy being around.
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Old 04-01-2007, 08:34 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjcali View Post
I am keen on visiting Durango. The idea of a pre-dated/smaller version of Boulder is appealing. I have heard the architecture/city feels very cowboy-like, whatever that might mean.

As for the snow, I have no problem with it. If I didnt want snow I certainly would't be moving to CO. This will be my first time settling into such a cold climate, but I'm looking forward to actually experiencing seasonal change. And I'm definitely eager for the green nature of CO.
The old downtown has some of the cowboy western look buildings with the old saloons and such. Mainly the city is southwestern in style with stucco and adobe condos and homes, or a mix of rock, adobe and logs, a unique but appealing look. Mission style seems to prevail alot as well. The old area has alot of Victorian homes too.

I like green too and I love going north of Durango to just soak in all the forests and mountains, or to the many area lakes to relax. You can get away from everybody in minutes, yet you can be in the hustle and bustle of the city too. I REALLY love that because sometimes you want to be in the hub bub and other times you just want to be alone and rejuvenate. Durango is great for that.Take care.
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Old 04-01-2007, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
92 posts, read 191,784 times
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Default Take a hard RIGHT to CO SPRNGS

Co Sprngs is ULTRA conservative/much military/dominant fundamentalist influence...city experiencing growing pains not great place for liberal-leaning folks...on plus side - reasonable housing cost, low utility cost, good medical facilities and great outdoor activities such as hiking, biking, skiing not far, etc.
other areas that are less conservative would be Boulder, Durango, some areas around Denver...however, those areas tend to be rather expensive...good luck
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Old 04-07-2007, 08:56 PM
 
4,406 posts, read 5,316,810 times
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Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
Westcliffe, remote, in the mountains, still close enough to access the big towns and cities for shopping, entertainment, etc.
I just spent a week in Colorado looking for that ideal spot (liberal is best for me). I was looking at property uphill from Cotopaxi (along US50) and deliberately drove to Westcliffe. It's very small but has a nice five-block long downtown area. I expected more trees, but, hey, without them, you can see the entire east face of the Sangre de Cristos! People were friendly and the realtors were helpful. The area is too isolated for me and I didn't get any liberal vibe.

Some have responded to my previous comment about Boulder attitudes. I know Boulder is a liberal haven, but in a previous post on this thread, I mentioned that I didn't like the attitude of the people. I'm VERY liberal on many issues (impeach the bastard for starters!) but... I just was turned off by what appeared to be a population of heavily distracted individuals who cared more about their town then each other. The service at Boulder restaurants was unattentive. The traffic was as bad as where I live now (AZ). The best apartments had waiting lists. The rules and regulations splattered on signs all over town were a bit overzealous. Generally, the people were UNwelcoming despite the fact that we'd probably all attend the same political riots, er, I mean, protests. If I had felt welcome in any of my numerous visits, I'd move there in a flash.

Durango is liberal, I felt it when I was there ("How does he do that?" they all wonder). I just didn't like the setting of the town and I don't like the areas around it. South is not worth exploring. North requires tire chains. East and west require some distance to get to something of interest (IMHO).

Salida CLAIMS to be a liberal-leaning town, but I really never sensed it. It closes at 6PM. The art crowd must have been out of town when I visited.

Montrose has the liberal vibe. I deliberately asked some people I bumped into about politics in the town and I received only deer-in-the-headlights responses. Apparently, most people don't care about politics there. I did like the quaint grid of streets and the fact that the area has some agriculture (think organic fruits and veggies).

I can't say I found nirvana, but I am pursuing a property outside Canon City, which I know isn't a liberal location (the multiple prisons are a red flag since I think our government will be jailing dissidents soon--yikes!). But, it does have a nice main street with shops and a great 'banana belt' climate.
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Old 04-08-2007, 08:46 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,091,437 times
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Well, if you want to live in Durango, Manitou Springs, or other Colorado mountain communities, YOU HAD BETTER BE A RICH LIBERAL bringing your money with you. Chances are, you won't be able to make enough there to pay the inflated real estate prices. Of course, that usually chafes a lot of the long-time locals (liberal or not) who have had to struggle for years to make a living in some of those places, except for those locals who make money selling real estate to the newcomers.

And, of course, it's usually those rich liberals who go out in the middle of some undeveloped spot and build a 5,000-10,000 sq. ft. house that takes a ton of propane and natural gas to heat, drive 12 mpg SUV's 150 miles a day taking their kids back and forth to town, fly 10 times a year back and forth to wherever ("we have to get away once in awhile")--then complain about gas-drilling, global warming, "redneck" hunters, and how there just isn't enough wilderness to keep those local low-lifes in Jeeps off of "their" public lands next to their trophy house. I don't agree with the ultra-conservative "let's just develop everything and the heck with the environment and poor folks" mentality, but at least they aren't hypocrites about it.

As to Durango specifically, it used to be my favorite town in Colorado. It was populated by a lot of good hard-working small town folks. It wasn't some totally fake version of a western town--it was the real thing. Then the PWM's (People With Money) discovered it, starting in the 1970's. Pretty soon, the old-line ranches got sold off to the developers, the part-time residents moved in, a lot of the long-time residents got tired of or priced out of the place and left, and the "beautiful people" took over. I had fully over a dozen friends who grew up in Durango--not one of them lives there now. They all came to hate what it had become--just one more Colorado resort full of recent transplants from elsewhere who knew nothing of the heritage, history, or people of the place. To those newcomers, it was just "a pretty place." I still think Durango is a pretty area, but I vehemently dislike what it has become.

Last edited by jazzlover; 04-08-2007 at 09:00 PM..
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Old 04-09-2007, 04:07 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,116 times
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Jazzlover, I can understand natives how they are used to something and changes occur that they dont like, that is understandable but change happens in lots of places. California, Nevada, Arizona, about everywhere out west is feeling the same growth pains. People are fleeing out of the northeast and settling for the nicer west and so are baby boomers and families getting out of the mega cities. They are trekking to the intermountain regions. Everyone has the right to live where they want to live. That is what America is all about. I understand though people liking a place to stay exactly like it has been, but America is getting more and more people from everywhere in the world every year, these people have to live somewhere, or we need to close the doors. Many of these foreigners flock to the mega cities and the people in these mega cities are moving to the Rockies. Barring closing the door to everybody and implementing forcing everyone to only have one child, like China, this country is going to grow in population - more and more. People are living longer too. So we all have to get used to more people. Yeah it sucks, but it is a reality.

As far your view of liberals, that is your right to express how you feel but I am a liberal and I dont want to drive a Hummer, even if I could buy one, or build a 5,000 square foot house, heck, I would be happy with a 1,000 square foot house - living in apartment, I would just love a house. I think somehow many conservatives have this impression that liberals are hypocrites because some are rich and have big homes but so do conservatives. Look at the Texans, most are conservatives and they have big Escalades, big brick homes with high pitched roofs, snake skin boots and leather chairs. That doesnt mean all Texans are that way but you can quickly lock a type of people into a mold, but that doesnt mean all are like that. But it is a two way street, both conservatives and liberals, or should I say, both sides, have those who live what they say and those who say one thing and do another.

I just want to add that on the liberal side, not all of us are tree hugging, anti-car, vegans. There are many different types of liberals, like I would think there would be many different types of conservatives. It is important not to lock all people into a mold. Everyone is different.

Last edited by I_LUVNM; 04-09-2007 at 04:17 AM..
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Old 04-09-2007, 08:23 AM
 
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To I_LUVNM,

It might surprise you to know that I consider myself a very moderate conservative. I like to say that I am a "Teddy Roosevelt" Republican in that I believe in things like a strong defense, but also believe that both big government and big business are a serious threat, especially when they start colluding with each other (that's what those lovely Nationalist/Socialists, the Nazis, did in Germany). I also believe in a strong conservation ethic. It is absolutely disgraceful the way this country is squandering its national resources for the purpose of wanton consumption, and I put much of the current "recreational" boom in that category.

I truly heed Teddy Roosevelt's warning about this, written a century ago:

"We of an older generation can get along with what we have, though with growing hardship; but in your full manhood and womanhood you will want what nature once so bountifully supplied and man so thoughtlessly destroyed; and because of that want you will reproach us, not for what we have used, but for what we have wasted...So any nation which in its youth lives only for the day, reaps without sowing, and consumes without husbanding, must expect the penalty of the prodigal whose labor could with difficulty find him the bare means of life."
--"Arbor Day - A Message to the School-Children of the United States" April 15, 1907

As to your thought that I am just pining for the way things were, I can see how you might draw that conclusion. I have not forgotten the things that weren't so good, either. For example, how, 40 years ago, many Colorado mountain towns didn't have safe drinking water, or how having a heart attack in rural Colorado meant dying because there were few rural hospitals with the equipment or knowhow to save a heart attack victim. So, I gladly embrace the good things that come with living today. I just don't think that I should have to blindly accept those things that I believe will, in the long run, bring us great harm and sadness. This country is heading in a direction that will bring its people under great peril in a relatively short time. We need to change direction and move upon a different path--one that most conservatives and liberals are currently unwilling to pursue.
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Old 04-09-2007, 10:18 AM
 
4,406 posts, read 5,316,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
As to your thought that I am just pining for the way things were, I can see how you might draw that conclusion. I have not forgotten the things that weren't so good, either. For example, how, 40 years ago, many Colorado mountain towns didn't have safe drinking water, or how having a heart attack in rural Colorado meant dying because there were few rural hospitals with the equipment or knowhow to save a heart attack victim. So, I gladly embrace the good things that come with living today. I just don't think that I should have to blindly accept those things that I believe will, in the long run, bring us great harm and sadness. This country is heading in a direction that will bring its people under great peril in a relatively short time. We need to change direction and move upon a different path--one that most conservatives and liberals are currently unwilling to pursue.
jazzlover, I understand your post about supposed two-faced liberals and in some instances I agree that many liberals (and conservatives) wear their persuasion like a label while doing things which undermine it. I also understand ILUVNM in explaining that the increase in population, while lamentable for its effects, is unavoidable. Change it seems IS inevitable.

Where I differ is in jazzlover's last statement above, specifically, that a different path towards a solution is apparently ignored by both liberals and conservatives. I think the path ahead is by design and both liberals and conservatives will have no say in its manifestation. Truth be told, I think 'liberals and conservatives' is a horrible way to define 300 million people politically. I believe our collective goals are quite similar, the methods are a bit divergent, but the reality is that none of us have the power to define the path. Big business (retail, energy, defense, religion) are determining the course of this country and American citizens are the expendable pawns in the game. Two sides can fight each other over who's right, but the simple fact is that while they're fighting, they let the players (and the game) continue around them. Until we realize we're being constantly manipulated to fight against each other, we won't be able to regain the power we once had and collectively pick the direction of the country for ourselves.

Hence, my interest in finding that small town in the mountains where I would feel comfortable, where political discourse won't be a complete challenge, all the while safely waiting for the game to end: the chaos you mention that "will bring its people under great peril in a relatively short time". I want to survive this dark time to help bring about what comes next, to help others recognize that their power is theirs if they decide to reclaim it, and that collectively we can reinvent this entire system of living. Having said this, I'm not sure if I'm liberal or conservative anymore. In the end, it won't matter.

Now, if I just had the courage to pay for that house in cash! I'm close, though! I'll probably be in CO this summer if all goes well.
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Old 04-09-2007, 10:40 AM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,784,136 times
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Originally Posted by mhouse2001 View Post
.... Big business (retail, energy, defense, religion) are determining the course of this country and American citizens are the expendable pawns in the game. Two sides can fight each other over who's right, but the simple fact is that while they're fighting, they let the players (and the game) continue around them. Until we realize we're being constantly manipulated to fight against each other, we won't be able to regain the power we once had and collectively pick the direction of the country for ourselves.
That is TRULY one of the best posts I've seen on C-D in a long time and speaks eloquently to what I've felt for some time....that the pols in DC (and more than a few state houses) are happy to see us at each other's throats over issues that aren't going anywhere (gun control, abortion, defense of marriage) and while we are distracted with single-issue politics, they keep on passing endless tax loopholes, giveaways, pork and earmarks for vested interests.

I've said for years that if we want things to change that we must NOT re-elect anyone....once we boot out 435 U.S.Reps, or the vast majority of them, all at one time, the sooner they will get the message of who's boss.

s/Mike
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