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Old 04-09-2007, 11:06 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
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to mhouse 2001,

Like you, I once had the vision of living in a small mountain town that would be a safe haven from the perilous times ahead. I actually lived in an area of Colorado that was pretty rural for many years. But then I figured out that those beautiful little mountain towns were at the very end of the distribution chain and had largely abandoned any kind of productive economy (ranching, farming, logging or mining) and concentrated on a recreational economy totally dependent on excess wealth and resources being available from the outside for survival.

Those beautiful areas have boomed and filled up with people from elsewhere because there HAS been excess wealth and resources to do so. The day of reckoning that I envision is when those resources are no longer available (probably starting with the end of plentiful and cheap oil). Then, the very things that make such places attractive today--isolation, lack of industry, distance from cities, etc.--will make them very UNDESIRABLE places to be. Mountain Colorado (and other Rocky Mountain states) have boomed because of cheap transportation--the end of cheap transportation will end the boom.

A friend who endured the Great Depression as a child in one of the most beautiful mountain areas of Colorado told me once, "Yeah, it was beautiful place, but you don't notice the beauty when you don't have enough to eat." It was that bad. They moved into the midwest, where his family could at least grow a garden and there were a few jobs to be had.
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Old 04-09-2007, 11:26 AM
 
4,406 posts, read 5,318,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
to mhouse 2001,

Like you, I once had the vision of living in a small mountain town that would be a safe haven from the perilous times ahead. I actually lived in an area of Colorado that was pretty rural for many years. But then I figured out that those beautiful little mountain towns were at the very end of the distribution chain and had largely abandoned any kind of productive economy (ranching, farming, logging or mining) and concentrated on a recreational economy totally dependent on excess wealth and resources being available from the outside for survival.

Those beautiful areas have boomed and filled up with people from elsewhere because there HAS been excess wealth and resources to do so. The day of reckoning that I envision is when those resources are no longer available (probably starting with the end of plentiful and cheap oil). Then, the very things that make such places attractive today--isolation, lack of industry, distance from cities, etc.--will make them very UNDESIRABLE places to be. Mountain Colorado (and other Rocky Mountain states) have boomed because of cheap transportation--the end of cheap transportation will end the boom.

A friend who endured the Great Depression as a child in one of the most beautiful mountain areas of Colorado told me once, "Yeah, it was beautiful place, but you don't notice the beauty when you don't have enough to eat." It was that bad. They moved into the midwest, where his family could at least grow a garden and there were a few jobs to be had.
I understand that too, which is why I'm concerned about the land I buy being at least somewhat agricultural. I have often thought about abandoning my love of mountainous seclusion and going back home to the Midwest to be surrounded by cornfields like I was in my youth. A small worm is gnawing its way around my brain now.
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Old 04-10-2007, 01:28 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,603 times
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Wow! I am taken aback! How we all, liberal and conservative actually are on the same thinking path! I actually agree with all of your posts. I am a liberal but I agree with you all. I hate how our politicians and talking heads are always playing us against each other, rather than tackling the issues in America and actually doing something about it. I am tired of both sides at each others throats. I want to see a good education for our kids. Many can not even read anymore or even know where America is located on a map! That is terrible!

The mega giant gas companies are squeezing us dry while they profit in the billions every month and nobody on both sides are doing anything about it. I would vote for anybody, liberal, conservative, green, yellow, orange, whatever, if they would just do something about these greedy gas companies, and do something about crime taking over cities. All these gangs putting people in fear and taking the lives of young innocent kids, killing them when they arent even gang members, but were at the wrong place at the wrong time. And harsh time for drunk drivers who kill people. How do these drunks keep getting out time after time, some many, many times having had their licenses revoked, still getting arrested and released and yet still end up killing people? How about keeping them sober by hard time in a labor camp? Keep them too busy to kill people.

I am also mad that big business is bleeding dry our natural resources. I mean how are these coal plants, known for all the brown smog they belch out are still being built? Wolf Creek still being built for some 10,000 plus rich people - pristine beautiful land, some of the most beautiful land you will see anywhere, being plowed under for thousands and thousands of homes and that area is one of the snowiest places in the USA - I dont see it being a real community, just a millionaire playground.

I applaud Durango for taking changes. They just voted out all the city council who thought they were shew ins and replaced them with more green environmentalists. Not extremists, but they know that green space matters and is important to keep pristine land pristine and ridgelines natural. I hope others all around Colorado will do the same. Get rid of anyone who holds on to "sprawl is the way to grow rich". Lets say adios to greedy politicians -whoever they may be. "Greedy people, dont let the door hit you on the back of your head on your way out of Colorado" the slogan. Really refreshing to know we are all on the same page!

Last edited by I_LUVNM; 04-10-2007 at 01:38 AM..
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Old 07-31-2010, 06:29 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,611 times
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Greetings everyone,
I'm pretty new to this, & in fact this is the first time I'm posting this message. Could anybody tells me where's the safest place to live in Colorado,or elsewhere to survive 12/21/2012 (cheap place though)?
I used to live in Durango, Colorado many years ago but, time's changed, & Durango is not the same Durango it once was.
I have a cleaning business and would like to continue doing my business in Colorado, or anywhere else but, don't know where to go.
I'd prefer living in a small town but, close enough to commute to a city or a big town to conduct my business. I'm a single father of 2 kids, & am doing this for them. Because I have a very strong feelings about 12/21/2012.
I'd rather stay safe in Colorado since it's almost in the middle of the country, & also close to the rocky mountains. I'll give it a (+), (-)1year in regards to 12/21/2012. The reason I chose Colorado is because it has highest elevation in the country like leadville, alma, & Denver, etc.....
If nothing happens, we'll go back to Blessed California. God help us all.I've been living in San Diego, California for over 35 years,and hate to pack,and leave to some unknown place not knowing anyone, & start all over again.
In any event,Could anybody please let me know where to go.It doesn't have to be a God forsaken Colorado. Just as long as it's safe from flooding,crime(not too much)of it, & could make a living by conducting my cleaning(pressure washing business) it would be fine.
By the way, I'm not a republican nor a democrat. I just generally like to meet friendly, & nice people wherever I go or live.
Am I asking for too much??? Would there be such a place in Colorado, or elsewhere in the country???
Looking at the map of united states, & Colorado, it's wise to be closer to the center of the country
in case of flooding, & 7 to 10000 ft. waves to cover the land. Considering the above, would it make any sense to locate myself on northeastern part of Colorado, or anywhere else for that matter? What do you think? Where would you go? We'd rather be safe than sorry.
Anyway,what do I know? I'm just a poor old man full of sins from head to tow who is trying to consider everything as long as
there's still 855 days left. There's not much time left to make my move.
Could you please help us.
To your health, & best days everyone.
2B (or) NOT 2B (12/21/2012)
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Old 07-31-2010, 08:03 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,044 posts, read 6,170,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjcali View Post
I am keen on visiting Durango. The idea of a pre-dated/smaller version of Boulder is appealing. I have heard the architecture/city feels very cowboy-like, whatever that might mean.

As for the snow, I have no problem with it. If I didnt want snow I certainly would't be moving to CO. This will be my first time settling into such a cold climate, but I'm looking forward to actually experiencing seasonal change. And I'm definitely eager for the green nature of CO.
was cowboy like. Durango is now a ripoff sanctuary city full of rich yuppies and illegals. I have to double cable and lock my tools to keep from getting them stolen when I do a job there .cowboy like? you have got to be kidding!
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Old 07-31-2010, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,255,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parfleche View Post
was cowboy like. Durango is now a ripoff sanctuary city full of rich yuppies and illegals. I have to double cable and lock my tools to keep from getting them stolen when I do a job there .cowboy like? you have got to be kidding!
I was reading that the city govt. actually discourages new buildings with 19th century motifs so as to prevent the town from turning into an Old West Williamsburg. The issue definitely has its pros and cons and I can see both sides.
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Old 08-01-2010, 03:18 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,837,013 times
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Wink Civilization beyond 2012

Per that pertaining to 2012, my understanding is that December 21, 2012 denotes the end of the Mayan calendar and the end of a cycle of about 5,000 years. The beginning of another. I do not expect any major floods, save those ordinarily expected from a warming climate: intemperate rainfall at times in places, and gradually rising ocean levels. Actually, this conversation might better have a thread all its own.

Assuming one was looking to Colorado as a refuge if everything goes to hell, that is another question. As you may see, areas of California would be as suitable as Colorado. Conversely the areas best suited for a normal living least suitable in extremes.

I have a friend who has cowboy'd up lately, or in any event gone NRA. He has been busy stockpiling an assortment of weapons, starting from near zero. Fine for home invasion and all that, but my question to him was what about the grocery store?

If memory serves it was the winter of 2007/2008, in December, when a good heavy snowfall closed down portions of Colorado. DIA shut down for a few days. At least in Estes Park a lot of the delivery trucks didn't bother trying to get up the hill to the Safeway grocery. It was enlightening to witness how swiftly perishables such as milk, and other items, vanished from the store shelfs. Not to be restocked, not in this case anyway until the weather had moderated some. If dealing with the end of the Earth and all that, one might presume the restocking would take even longer.

Presumably in a scenario of catastrophe basics are what count, as in safety, food and shelter. As far as safety is concerned one would surely be better off removed from all the mayhem, with a rural setting vastly preferable to urban. Which also implies that unless you are really tight with your neighbors you'd be better off way out in the woods. Likely in partnership with a few other like-minded souls, as in enough to pull sentry duty, etc. This would also imply you had thought ahead and located sufficient food and shelter at this remote location. What this quickly escalates into is survivalist planning, and then the question just who wants to spend all their time more or less living in a cave for who knows how long when nothing ever happens, or just until 2012? One might have, perhaps these last 30 years, and then woke up one morning and said, jeez, I could have been driving a Lexus the whole time.

Of course you'll look pretty wise if all falls apart, and one of the few truly prepared. Make no mistake, most of us are anything but. However read a little history, one only has to study the life of trappers in the American west, say about 1830, to get a sense of what life might be like. Because if all this ends not only will there be no grocery stores, no gas stations, no McDonald's, hell, there won't even be a Starbucks! If the possibility of scrounging through the debris left, basically one will be in the position of having to come up with everything they might like or need from scratch. Even that survivalist stockpile of cans and whatnot will probably only last a few years.

Even these trappers of yore depended upon civilization for some of their most basic necessities, such as cloth, knives, rifles and gunpowder. Most usually they had one shot a year, at rendezvous, to stock up. They didn't miss it. Yes, it was also a bacchanalian delight and often non-stop party for several weeks of socializing. But verily their lifeline as well to goods transported all the way from the settled east coast.

I don't know about you, but still preferring to have some place to plug my iPod in. Preferably with a solar source of electricity. That is rather the thing, as far wrong as much of this has gone, and as much as we may detest facets of this civilization, by and large we not only need it but would really miss it if gone.

Perhaps wise to see if the best aspects of it can continue.
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Old 08-01-2010, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Trinidad CO
91 posts, read 217,748 times
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Definately Nederland! You are from LA...You will be used to a 30 min drive to Boulder...almost one hour to Denver...Buses run to both...Make a trip out before you move and investigate! Good Luck!
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Old 08-01-2010, 12:48 PM
 
20,308 posts, read 37,797,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
....If memory serves it was the winter of 2007/2008, in December, when a good heavy snowfall closed down portions of Colorado. DIA shut down for a few days. ....
That was Dec 20-21, 2006. Another bizzard a week later. Another one a month later.
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Old 08-01-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,627 posts, read 3,619,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjcali View Post
Somewhere quaint, open-minded, near or in the trees, and not too far from some city life/cultural activites.
Trees...trees...I heard of those once...

You might be overstating the case against COS a bit much. Yes, as day to day life goes, it does lean to the right politically. It can be sprawly, big box store driven, etc... However, COS is only an hour south of Denver, it IS in a great location as far as outdoors activities go (though it does get crazy during tourist season), and there are plenty of towns in the surrounding area that might make a great fit.

Also, Colorado in general is kind of a unique class politically. Pigeonholing people here is a bit more difficult than in some other parts of the country. May of the same people who like their guns, like to fish and like the freedom of their SUVs (well, mostly Subarus, here) also don't mind paying taxes for transit, support helping the homeless and enjoy civic improvements. I'm pretty sure marijuana legalization doesn't even fall onto the left-right spectrum here. Even all of that's too simplistic. There are a few noisy nuttters on the right who happen to live in COS and some vocal whiners on the left that happen to live in Boulder that give you the impression that the two cities are worlds apart, but not as much as I think it seems. Yes, Colorado Springs is cheaper, a little more "leave me alone / live and let live" and more spread out where Boulder is denser, more engaged and more "collegiate." Outside of that, both cities have artists, campers, hunters, snowboarders, some nice places to live, some crappy places to live and both have people who have to get up and go to work everyday (though same make other arguments against that regarding Boulder, I tend to think it's mostly blowing smoke.)

Good for you for researching first, though. At least you've got a good head start!
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