U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-09-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
84,960 posts, read 98,795,031 times
Reputation: 31371

Advertisements

From: Team Mom
Quote:
My children are fortunate to be in fabulous schools, but the pressure are high and even the young ones seem to feel it. In CA you there is pressure to be smart and beautiful!
The same can be said for Colorado. My kids went through it. One developed an eating disorder in college, is OK now. Colorado is the "thinnest" state. Lots of pressure to be thin. I work in a dr's office and see little girls, ages 3 and up, take off their shoes to get weighed! Sad. Lots of academic pressure, too, starting in about 3rd grade. "Have to take this course to get in to a 'good' college." Then a lot of them end up going to community college or a small state u. because they are burned out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-22-2007, 10:17 PM
 
55 posts, read 194,538 times
Reputation: 28
Default CA to Durango

Great topic. My husband and I just announced to our children that we are leaving No. Cal to move to Durango, CO. I'm so terrified I keep having second and third thoughts. A little background: I am a Bay Area native. Have been here for 44 years. We live in a very nice, safe community with good schools. I traveled to the Point Reyes area of CA today and enjoyed a day of sea kayaking with my son...beautiful! There are many down to earth people in our community. So why leave? Well, a number of reasons:

1. Cost of living. My husband makes over $100K but it's not enough to live a good quality of life here. You cannot purchase a house in our neighborhood for under $850,000. And remember the property taxes on such a house in CA are going to run you around $12,000! Gas is hovering aroun $3.35 per gallon. My kids have been selected to play on competitive soccer teams (about $1,000 each for the season), etc., etc.

2. As our area has "grown up", it's become the shopping, entertainment, and dining mecca for our county. That's great if you don't mind the accompaning traffic and congestion.

3. There is a segment of the population here who believes shopping is a pastime and the mall a destination. We had a new "fad" store open up and the kids were lined up at 6 in the morning (this has happened 3 times that I know of)to wait for the store's sale. The sale was on tennis shoes. Sale price? $125.00.

4. There is a lot of pressure on kids here to a)look good. Fake boobs, dyed hair, manicures and pedicures. b)be great at a sport and excel in school. We start them off in sports at age 3 or 4. By age 9, they are on competitive teams (if they are good enough, of course) with paid trainers. (and we wonder why so many more children are having stress fractures!)

5. Because of the pressure, fast pace, etc. many parents are either on medication themselves and/or are medicating their children. (yes, I know there are some that absolutely need it, but that's not the case with the majority). My son's school wanted me to medicate him when he was in second grade because he was distratable. (mind you, he wasn't causing problems in class, had no social issues, and was doing well grade wise, just struggling a bit with turning in homework and staying organized...not unusual for a young boy!). I refused. He is now a succesful middle schooler.

6. Access to recreation. There are limited places in CA where I would send my children to public school. I happen to live in one. However, we are an outdoor family. Skiing is 3 1/2 hours away. (plan on 6 hours to get back, though!) It will be a $1,000 weekend between gas, hotel, food, and lift tickets. The ocean is wonderful. Expect to travel a couple of hours each way...it's not too far but the traffic through Silicon Valley is horrid. So, "access" is quite relative.

All that said, it simply is no longer the place I want to raise my children. I am very sad about this. I'm frightened of making such a large move although I've visited Durango twice and can only say great things about it. I'm sure a year from now, I'll be wondering why I ever questioned it.

Anyway, that's my two cents to add to this most interesting topic!

LFults
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2007, 10:41 PM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,338 times
Reputation: 190
Hi LFults! I love Durango too. It is a very nice city with friendly people and most tend to live healthy and outdoorsy. It is a nice area to raise a family. The housing is high but I know California since my sis lived there and know prices are insane out there so it isnt high like that but for say a 2500 to 3000 square foot home it will run in the 300s to 400s. Further suburbs will be less. Older Victorian homes in the city will be very high. The city is a nice place to live with a great recreation center, great schools, a new multi-million dollar library on the way and more. They recently elected a whole new city council who will be more geared to green living and are for open space. They are not anti-growth but will focus more on building in certain areas and not in other areas like ridgelines, wildlife zones etc. Me being single AND a mom, I do good to live ok, so I live in Farmington, NM but the homes run about as high here. If you can afford a home in Durango and coming from CA, you probably should be able to, Durango is a wonderful city. Take care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2007, 10:45 PM
 
48 posts, read 240,728 times
Reputation: 28
We wpuld like to leave to with the same reasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2007, 08:54 AM
 
20,304 posts, read 37,790,850 times
Reputation: 18081
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFults View Post
....I'm sure a year from now, I'll be wondering why I ever questioned it.... LFults
Trust me...you're gonna love Colorado.

s/mike from back east
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2007, 01:56 PM
 
55 posts, read 194,538 times
Reputation: 28
Hello again I_LUVNM and Mike from Back East. You two and Crackerjack were instrumental in us taking a harder look at Durango. My husband and I spent 6 days there during Snowdown and had a blast. I was there again for 4 day two weeks ago just to make sure it's what was in my heart. I brought my best friend (who does not want me to move, but thinks its the best thing for my family). She came with the intent of making a list of the 10 top reasons we should NOT move to Durango. After 4 days, she only found 2, admitting they were both selfish: 1) The plane flight in and out...she didn't like the little planes and the bumps over the Rockies; and 2) leaving her. Otherwise, she thought Durango was a great place to raise kids. It's hard to watch your kids be so sad though, to leave their friends, their soccer teams, etc., but I think it will be the right choice.

I must say that housing in Durango has been a bit more of a challenge than we predicted. The inventory is fairly low. We've been using a local realtor and haven't found much in our price range that would work for us. I'll admit we are a bit picky, but am still surprised at the lack of choices at this time. Things are picking up a bit now so we're hopeful. My husband goes out this weekend to make sure it's what's still in his heart as well, and he will go house hunting again. We are trying to keep the mortgage low as my husband is in a start up company and it's possible he'll be unemployed after December (gulp!), so we need to have some $'s in reserve as it might take a while for him to pull something together again in Durango. (by the way, he's a software architech, if anyone knows of any businesses in Durango that might be appropriate! He specailizes in compressed software).

If anyone out there knows any kids in Durango who would like a pen pal, that would be great! My son is 12 and my daughter is 8.

Thanks again to those who provide such valuable information on this forum. It has helped us make what I'm sure will be a life changing decision. I'm a bit overwhelmed readying our home for sale, but hope I can help others as you have done for us!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2007, 03:56 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Default Reading these posts are a HOOT!

I'm always amazed when I read posts from people who want to get out of suburban California (or wherever) and get their kids away from drugs, gangs, endless mall shopping, etc., etc.--then pick a resort area (like Durango) as THE place. Well, probably half the parents and half the kids in a place like Durango moved from a place like suburban California in the last five years. You think they're going to be sudddenly different? If they used drugs there, they'll probalby use 'em in Colorado. In a gang there? Probably find one in Colorado. A "mall rat" there? Probably will be in Colorado. My ex was a Colorado teacher. The school she worked at didn't have many gang, drug, anorexia, or myriads of other problems until an influx of California transplant students hit the place. Just about every kid she saw with those problems was one of the "transplant" kids, and just about everyone of their parents told her, "That's why I moved out of California before my kid started doing that stuff. I don't know why he/she started that here." Yeah, right.

The "transplants" usually don't escape those kinds of problems in a place like Durango--they just bring the problems with them. Durango (and a whole lot of other Colorado resort towns--I'm not trying to single Durango out) are not typical small towns--there little miniaturized suburbias with all of the attendant problems. They just happen to be in a pretty setting. Sociologically, they are often unbalanced and unhealthy places.

LFults, everything you loathe in the Bay Area (except the big population and congestion) you should be able to find in Durango within 6 months of residency. It's pretty much all there. I will admit (before ILUVNM jumps all over me on this--I think she is a gem, by the way) that Durango as a community isn't as over the top bonkers as many other Colorado resort areas--Aspen would be the most extreme, it deserves to be on another planet. Telluride's not far behind. Give Durango a few more years--it's working on it.

When it comes to Colorado, a lot of people get mesmorized by the pretty face and don't/won't want to see anything else. In romance, I think they call that infatuation. Colorado can do that to you, I'll admit. I happen to think Paris Hilton is pretty darn good looking, but she's the last woman in the world that I would want to marry. You got to get past the good looks, sometimes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2007, 01:23 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,338 times
Reputation: 190
I am not going to jump on you Jazzlover - at least not this time! No seriously, I was over in Durango and we had a get together with my friends and sort of a "round table" discussion, well actually a square table and just eating and talking, but you get the idea. I brought up about these posts and actually had them (8 in all) read these and recent ones by Jazzlover (who doesnt see Colorado with rose colored glasses), well, you dont Jazzlover but anyhow, 3 have been in Durango for over 12 years, 2 for 5 and 1 for 2 or 3, cant remember and a couple from California who are recent. They just kinda chuckled at your posts Jazzlover. The California couple didnt, they dont know Durango too well. Here are the general answers from them, Durangoans who live IN Durango, not like me or you Jazzlover:
Durango is becoming very diversified, new computer tech companies, light industrial parks coming in, new large hospital with new surgery centers, medical centers, fashion industry, they are making clothes here now, the movie industries are here and producing local movies, entertainment, artists, dancers, sculpturers, the food industry, Durango has more restaurants per capita then San Francisco, law is growing and Durango is rumored to be the western slope location for a new Colorado High court, mountain bikers are moving here since it is the perfect terrains to train, some high figures ones live here, dont forget the college with some 4,000 students, construction jobs, they cant get enough to keep up with demand, graphic designers here, authors, new age centers, lots of pets so lots of anything for pets, and on and on. The old days of Durango being a ski resort tourist town are long gone. Remarks are: The cities to suffer from Jazzlovers prophecy of doom would be the resort only towns and millionaire towns of Aspen, Telluride, Vail, Breckenridge, Steamboat Springs etc. They are dependent on the rich and skiing, period. Those towns are the one to suffer should the doomsday clock strick. Durango has a large middle class, those other towns dont. Durango is close to Farmington, the oil capital of northern NM. Oil is king. Farmington is becoming what Midland is to Texas. Many stores abound in Farmington, an hour away from Durango. The cities co-exist along with Pagosa and Cortez to form a unique bond. What one city needs they get from the other and vice versa. Workers included. Plus there is always the ski resort, which is all those other towns sole bread and butter. I know conservatives rant about the liberals moving into Durango and sorry to have to bring it up, since someone mentioned why we bring it up, but sometimes you have to since I have read posts lately about all the liberals coming in and in essence ruining Durango. Durango has never been better. Sure traffic can get maddening at times but nothing like a huge city. Durango has alot to offer and that was the sentiment of ALL in our discussion chat including the Californian newcomers, who I know Jazzlovers teeth are grinding on that one, but they are conservative, so be kind to them Jazzlover. I like Californians. They offer different perspectives to Colorado, living out there. Sure there are always the "barbie and ken OC plastics" but not very many are really like that and according to my Californian friends, they detest them as do many Californians, or what they call "the Flaky Fakes". For those who dont like Californians coming into Colorado, all the ones I have met are nice people, try talking to them, you might just find out they arent all that different after all. So take a deep breath now Jazzlover and just enjoy life. Peace!

Last edited by I_LUVNM; 04-24-2007 at 01:33 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2007, 01:48 AM
 
476 posts, read 2,088,338 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFults View Post
Hello again I_LUVNM and Mike from Back East. You two and Crackerjack were instrumental in us taking a harder look at Durango. My husband and I spent 6 days there during Snowdown and had a blast. I was there again for 4 day two weeks ago just to make sure it's what was in my heart. I brought my best friend (who does not want me to move, but thinks its the best thing for my family). She came with the intent of making a list of the 10 top reasons we should NOT move to Durango. After 4 days, she only found 2, admitting they were both selfish: 1) The plane flight in and out...she didn't like the little planes and the bumps over the Rockies; and 2) leaving her. Otherwise, she thought Durango was a great place to raise kids. It's hard to watch your kids be so sad though, to leave their friends, their soccer teams, etc., but I think it will be the right choice.

I must say that housing in Durango has been a bit more of a challenge than we predicted. The inventory is fairly low. We've been using a local realtor and haven't found much in our price range that would work for us. I'll admit we are a bit picky, but am still surprised at the lack of choices at this time. Things are picking up a bit now so we're hopeful. My husband goes out this weekend to make sure it's what's still in his heart as well, and he will go house hunting again. We are trying to keep the mortgage low as my husband is in a start up company and it's possible he'll be unemployed after December (gulp!), so we need to have some $'s in reserve as it might take a while for him to pull something together again in Durango. (by the way, he's a software architech, if anyone knows of any businesses in Durango that might be appropriate! He specailizes in compressed software).

If anyone out there knows any kids in Durango who would like a pen pal, that would be great! My son is 12 and my daughter is 8.

Thanks again to those who provide such valuable information on this forum. It has helped us make what I'm sure will be a life changing decision. I'm a bit overwhelmed readying our home for sale, but hope I can help others as you have done for us!
LFults, I wish you the best in Durango. The best friends I have ever had are in Durango. People are just nice and open there. Anyway, good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2007, 08:57 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
ILUVNM,

Actually, I'm not grinding my teeth. I will agree with you on this: Durango is much more "normal" than many other resort communities, for the very reasons that you state. Is it better than it once was? That is a matter of opinion and perspective. My familiarity with Durango goes back 40 years--I doubt many of those residents you were talking to have even been alive that long.

The first time I was in Durango, the town (as did Farmington) still had railroad freight service from Alamosa. About where the mall is today was the Weidman (spelling?) sawmill. If the wind was from the south, you could smell the slash burner in town. That same wind would blow radioactive uranium mill tailing dust all over town. The area south and east of the railroad yard was called "Mexican Flats." The people who lived there didn't complain about the coal smoke from the railroad yard because a number of them worked for the railroad. (Now, the yuppie residents in that "gentrified" area get all twisted off about the smoke from the railroad yard that was there "only" 125 years before they showed up! That would be the railroad that platted Durango and for all of its history has been a major reason for its existence.) A good chunk of the town itself was still coal-heated.

The area north of "Animas City" (I don't think anybody calls the north end of Durango that, anymore) to Hermosa was almost all irrrigated ranches and oxbow lakes on the Animas River. When the Animas flooded over Labor Day weekend in 1970 (I was there and have the photos to prove it!), the only thing out of the water was the highway. All of those "pretty" houses in the valley there now would have had 4-6 feet of water in them that day. 22 out of 45 miles of what is now the Durango & Silverton RR were washed out, and the whole town was terriified that the Denver & Rio Grande Western wouldn't rebuild it, and the economy of Durango would dry up and blow away. Fortunately, the railroad did rebuild, and I have railroad buddies who worked on that project.

When I was a young, single guy, Durango was one fun place. I closed the Diamond Belle on more than a few nights. If you wanted to go on a bender, Durango was a good place to do it. I dodged beer pitchers being thrown out of Francisco's bar onto Main Ave. before Francisco's became a more "upscale" place. The food there was just as good then. Farquart's (spelling again?) was a later newcomer to the bar scene, and a good brawl of "cowboys and hippies" would break out in front on some nights. There were a lot of Italian families in Durango and one of the best Italian restaurants I ever ate at was south of town towards Carbon Jct.--I can't remember the name now. You could stay at the TravelLodge down by the railroad yard, wander through the abandoned Telluride Iron Works building and go shoot the breeze with the railroaders getting the locomotives ready for the Silverton train or the occassional freight headed east or south. If you followed the railroad east to Chama, New Mexico, you would see a chunk of country and civilization that hadn't changed much since about 1910.

I knew a guy whose family owned a jewelry store in Durango. In the 1950's they had 55 gallon drums full of antique Navajo jewelry in the basement of the store that they couldn't give away. Most of the downtown businesses had been in the same families for generations. They had coffee every day at one of the local drug stories and ran the town from there. The "big boxes out in the pasture" hadn't been built yet. "Seasonal residences" in the mountains were two room cabins with an outhouse. The "rich" oil people in Durango lived in some nice houses out towards Florida Road that would be considered a "starter house" by many dot.com yuppies today.

If you took a Jeep out on some of the now famous trails in the San Juans during the week, you might not see another vehicle for a couple of days. In many of the ghost towns, some then abandoned for nearly 50 years, you could still find tools and equipment lying just where they had been left--not yet "collected" by somebody.

I have a real hard time thinking that Durango is "better" today. Like I say, a matter of opinion and perspective. Durango was no "paradise" the first time that I saw it. That said, given a choice of Durango 1967 or Durango 2007--I'd take Durango 1967 in a New York (or California) minute, warts and all. A matter of perpective . . .

Last edited by jazzlover; 04-24-2007 at 09:19 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top