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Old 03-25-2011, 04:28 PM
 
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Currently live in a mountain village in SE New Mexico, and we're getting worried about our water supply (severe drought and diminishing winter snows have made this area very arid).
Love altitude, but hate humidity.
Thinking about the GJ area (Fruita, Montrose, etc) and wondered about taxes (CO state as well as local property tax), water availability for the foreseeable future, as well as the political climate.
Any info gratefully received.
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Old 03-25-2011, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Western, Colorado
1,599 posts, read 2,681,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakebluffer View Post
Currently live in a mountain village in SE New Mexico, and we're getting worried about our water supply (severe drought and diminishing winter snows have made this area very arid).
Love altitude, but hate humidity.
Thinking about the GJ area (Fruita, Montrose, etc) and wondered about taxes (CO state as well as local property tax), water availability for the foreseeable future, as well as the political climate.
Any info gratefully received.
Taxes - Colorado has one of the lowest overall tax burdens of any state. This is taking into account income, sales, property, and any other tax.

Water - We have water - it's just that the front range continues to try to divert more to the east.

Political climate - pretty conservative, and hopefully it stays that way.
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Old 03-25-2011, 08:13 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 35,874,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakebluffer View Post
Currently live in a mountain village in SE New Mexico, and we're getting worried about our water supply (severe drought and diminishing winter snows have made this area very arid).
Love altitude, but hate humidity.
Thinking about the GJ area (Fruita, Montrose, etc) and wondered about taxes (CO state as well as local property tax), water availability for the foreseeable future, as well as the political climate.
Any info gratefully received.
If you are buying you will want land that includes the water rights. I had friends who lived in the Montrose/Fruitia area on a couple of acres. Heart of Colorado's peach country. Beautiful areas with fantastic views of Mt. Garfield.
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Old 03-25-2011, 11:14 PM
 
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Thanks motoracer and MOgal.
Motoracer: When you say "the front range," do you mean the State of CO is selling off water rights or what? Or there is a general consensus of the local residents that more should be diverted?
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Western, Colorado
1,599 posts, read 2,681,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakebluffer View Post
Thanks motoracer and MOgal.
Motoracer: When you say "the front range," do you mean the State of CO is selling off water rights or what? Or there is a general consensus of the local residents that more should be diverted?
Front Range is Ft. Collins down to Pueblo and everything in between - including Denver.
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by motoracer51 View Post
Taxes - Colorado has one of the lowest overall tax burdens of any state. This is taking into account income, sales, property, and any other tax.

I do wish people would quit posting things that are NOT ACCURATE. Colorado has one of the lowest effective property tax rates on residential property in the nation. That much is true. However, Colorado's income tax is middling compared to other states, and sales taxes--when one considers both state and local sales taxes--are also middling to high. In some locales in Colorado, total sales tax is 8 1/2% or more--hardly cheap. Fuel taxes are also middling, and vehicle registration fees are relatively high.

If you want a low tax burden on residents, move to Wyoming--no income tax, low property taxes, low fuel taxes, and a middling sales tax. That is a low tax burden state for its residents--Colorado is not.
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Western, Colorado
1,599 posts, read 2,681,700 times
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Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I do wish people would quit posting things that are NOT ACCURATE. Colorado has one of the lowest effective property tax rates on residential property in the nation. That much is true. However, Colorado's income tax is middling compared to other states, and sales taxes--when one considers both state and local sales taxes--are also middling to high. In some locales in Colorado, total sales tax is 8 1/2% or more--hardly cheap. Fuel taxes are also middling, and vehicle registration fees are relatively high.

If you want a low tax burden on residents, move to Wyoming--no income tax, low property taxes, low fuel taxes, and a middling sales tax. That is a low tax burden state for its residents--Colorado is not.
Yes, WY is better ( lower overall burden ), but A. If you think there are few jobs in CO, well, ha. B. The economy is tiny. C. Wind.

CO is a good balance - it's ranked 39th lowest compared to 45th for WY, and while I respect your knowledge and input, I feel you are a very pessimistic person who I'd suspect has slight anger issues, and possibly even depression.

Just my opinion, and everyone know what they are worth.
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Old 03-27-2011, 08:45 AM
 
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Thx for the clarification, Motoracer.
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Old 03-27-2011, 09:31 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,111,186 times
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Originally Posted by motoracer51 View Post
Yes, WY is better ( lower overall burden ), but A. If you think there are few jobs in CO, well, ha. B. The economy is tiny. C. Wind.

CO is a good balance - it's ranked 39th lowest compared to 45th for WY, and while I respect your knowledge and input, I feel you are a very pessimistic person who I'd suspect has slight anger issues, and possibly even depression.

Just my opinion, and everyone know what they are worth.
You are absolutely right about wind in parts of Wyoming. And, yes, Colorado's tax system is fairly balanced--but that doesn't change the fact that Colorado is also in serious fiscal crisis.

Whether Colorado is attractive to the OP will depend a lot on their individual circumstance. For example, compared to New Mexico, Colorado has relatively few tax benefits for retirees or veterans--New Mexico has quite a few. New Mexico is a notoriously cheap place to register a vehicle--especially an expensive new vehicle--because the registration fee is based solely on weight, not value. Not true in Colorado--expensive vehicle = expensive registration. New Mexico's income tax used to be highly progressive--meaning higher rates as one's income was higher--though I understand those rates have flattened somewhat. Colorado's income tax rate is flat. If one gets divorced, New Mexico is a community property state, Colorado is not. And on and on. So, there isn't a simple answer to the OP's question. And, quite frankly, most of those "tax ranking" blurbs are way oversimplified. As an example of that, Wyoming is shown in many rankings to have one of the highest tax burdens per capita in the United States. That particular study computed the ranking by taking total state and local revenue and dividing it by the state population to get the per capita tax burden. Of course, it totally ignored the little fact that almost 75% of all state and local tax revenues in Wyoming come from the minerals industry, not from state residents. Oops. Those "rankings" really mean nothing unless one knows how they were derived, and most mass media stories never disclose the methodology--which makes the conclusion pretty much worthless. By the way, I spent several years researching state and local tax policy as part of my work, so I'm not just wildly opining here.

To answer the OP's question about water--well, there isn't a simple answer there, either. Municipalities like Grand Junction, Delta, and Montrose have relatively secure domestic water supplies based on very senior water rights and robust reservoir and distribution systems. Smaller communities and outlying areas may not be so fortunate. Unlike many places, Colorado's west central valleys have very little well water available--the aquifers just aren't there, or the water that is there is very brackish and saline. So, outlying areas rely on domestic water providers that gather surface water supplies and pipe them to customers. Those entities may or may not have adequate senior water rights or robust distribution systems. For those outlying parcels, outdoor irrigation will require the owner to have surface irrigation water rights--and for reliable supplies, the rights will have to be pretty senior.

So, unless you are buying a home in one of the municipalities or in an area served by a "robust" water provider (Tri-county in parts of Delta, Montrose, or Ouray County, for example), you had better have a good knowledge of Colorado water law (or have a reputable attorney who does) before purchasing property in the area. Caveat emptor, baby.
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Old 11-20-2011, 02:42 PM
 
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Smile Thinking about Grand Junction

We are considering a move to GJ. I am a Field Safety Coordinator for an industrial electrical contractor....my wife is a RN.

Our daughter will most likely be going to Colorado State. I have not checked out the job situation in GJ....but it seems kinda nice. We currently live in Bakersfield Ca.

Any advice is welcomed
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