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Old 07-13-2010, 05:24 PM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,783 posts, read 3,598,182 times
Reputation: 939

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Go east. Walsenberg, La Junta, Rocky Ford, Lamar. These are the only really decent places in Colorado (one person's opinion). The rest of it is just California in different clothes. The real Colorado people are where it isn't so "trendy" to live.

20yrsinBranson
who once lived in Colorado
I like west of Trinidad. Some pretty country there.
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Old 07-14-2010, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Del Norte NM
529 posts, read 1,165,729 times
Reputation: 165
Although places like LaJunta, Rocky Ford and Lamar have lots to love, abeit they are on the plains, the OP is looking in Mountain Colorado. Not only might it be hard to find a construction job there, trying to pay $1000 rent on $10 an hour, if the wages are that high, will be tough.
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Old 06-18-2011, 05:37 AM
 
20 posts, read 19,565 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by treedonkey View Post
If your definition of 'rural' is a lesser-known mountain town with some harsh weather but plenty of open space and available acreage at reasonable prices, then Yes we have some of that as well, just NOT along the I70 corridor.
First post. This is an old thread, but Treelover, if you're still around, would you mind expanding on this a bit?

My story, in brief, is that I'm a former chef, moving on to another life in pasture-based dairying, and farmstead cheesemaking. I live in the MW, but am looking for a climate that suits the kind of life and cheeses I make, which is alpine. It goes all the way to the breed of cattle I'm interested in - cattle that are known good foragers, and converters to milk, off of less than optimal land; Tarentaise, for example.

So, I'm searching for an area such as you're describing, but know very little about CO geography. In terms of your above post, can you talk about which area or areas you're indicating, specifically?

Very much appreciated.
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Old 06-18-2011, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,661 posts, read 9,393,458 times
Reputation: 2891
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arfrom View Post
First post. This is an old thread, but Treelover, if you're still around, would you mind expanding on this a bit?

My story, in brief, is that I'm a former chef, moving on to another life in pasture-based dairying, and farmstead cheesemaking. I live in the MW, but am looking for a climate that suits the kind of life and cheeses I make, which is alpine. It goes all the way to the breed of cattle I'm interested in - cattle that are known good foragers, and converters to milk, off of less than optimal land; Tarentaise, for example.

So, I'm searching for an area such as you're describing, but know very little about CO geography. In terms of your above post, can you talk about which area or areas you're indicating, specifically?

Very much appreciated.

Look at Collbran in western Colorado. It's agricultural. It's off the beaten track. It's how Colorado used to be.
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Old 06-18-2011, 01:10 PM
 
9,894 posts, read 6,229,577 times
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Springfield is really rural (I160 East). It's flat, but lots of beautiful sky. Saw it the other day after they closed Raton Pass and I took a long detour. Anywho, it reminded me of the towns I used to see when I was a kid.
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Old 06-18-2011, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Clovis Strong, NM
3,376 posts, read 4,787,933 times
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Anywhere along the 160 and 285 still has that rural/small-town flavor.
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Old 06-18-2011, 01:37 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,748,106 times
Reputation: 9129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arfrom View Post
First post. This is an old thread, but Treelover, if you're still around, would you mind expanding on this a bit?

My story, in brief, is that I'm a former chef, moving on to another life in pasture-based dairying, and farmstead cheesemaking. I live in the MW, but am looking for a climate that suits the kind of life and cheeses I make, which is alpine. It goes all the way to the breed of cattle I'm interested in - cattle that are known good foragers, and converters to milk, off of less than optimal land; Tarentaise, for example.

So, I'm searching for an area such as you're describing, but know very little about CO geography. In terms of your above post, can you talk about which area or areas you're indicating, specifically?

Very much appreciated.
The dairy business can be pretty tough in Colorado because of the short growing season and the amount of acreage necessary to support even a small herd. IT IS NOTHING LIKE FARMING IN THE MIDWEST. Unlike most posters on this forum, I spent a number of years working in agriculture in Colorado. Working farms and ranches in Colorado are usually either married or inherited. Any other way of acquisition on the open market is usually so high-priced that the operation won't cash flow for anyone with the idea of making a living at agriculture. For tax shelters and play farms for the idle rich, agriculture can be a pleasant diversion, but for serious agriculturalists intent on making a profit, Colorado is not a good place to be in agriculture compared to a myriad other places in the US. It pains me to say that, because agriculture is still a crucial industry in Colorado, but it is under full assault from municipal water grabs and land development pressures just about everywhere aside from the Eastern Plains, which don't really fit most outsiders' view of what Colorado is.

I know a number of former Colorado ranchers and farmers--ones who are serious farmers and ranchers--who have relocated their operations to other states in the last 20 years because of the increasingly difficult economic, political, and social environment in Colorado. It's just a fact. The old adage holds true: "What to make a small fortune in ranching and farming in Colorado?" "Start with a BIG fortune." A couple of million bucks would be a good start.
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Old 06-18-2011, 03:00 PM
 
16,488 posts, read 20,873,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elan View Post
Springfield is really rural (I160 East). It's flat, but lots of beautiful sky. Saw it the other day after they closed Raton Pass and I took a long detour. Anywho, it reminded me of the towns I used to see when I was a kid.
Now there's a town that doesn't get much mention on this forum. I've been through there several times, not in years though. That mom and pop truck stop on the east side of the highway south of town has a heck of an all you can eat spaghetti special when I have stopped there!

You want rural, they're rural. One of my close friends parents live near there (actually Campo). 287 runs pretty wide open out there, particularly when Oklahoma closed their port of entry (assuming it's still closed). A lot of truck traffic through there.

I'm very familiar with that fire going on east of Raton, thankfully I-25 has been reopened.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 06-18-2011 at 04:22 PM..
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Old 06-18-2011, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,172 posts, read 20,928,232 times
Reputation: 4258
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
Now there's a town that doesn't get much mention on this forum. I've been through there several times, not in years though. That mom and pop truck stop on the east side of the highway south of town has a heck of an all you can eat spaghetti special when I have stopped there!

You want rural, they're rural. One of my close friends parents live near there (actually Campo). 287 runs pretty wide open out there, particularly when Oklahoma closed their port of entry (assuming it's still closed). A lot of truck traffic through there.

I'm very familiar with that fire going on east of Raton, thankfully I-25 has been reopened.
I looked up the population for Springfield and it is 1,562. My high school had about that many people. So yes I would consider that very rural as well.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 06-18-2011 at 04:21 PM..
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Old 06-19-2011, 01:31 PM
 
20 posts, read 19,565 times
Reputation: 20
Thanks all, for the replies and thoughts. I should mention a couple more things - and see if this changes the perspective at all. I will not be entering the commodity milk game. I think it's a tough proposition anywhere, and so many things are stacked against its success, I wouldn't dream of entering it - if I even wanted to.

No, mine is an entirely different scenario. I envision no more than 15 head of cattle, heritage breed; Normande, Ayrshire, Tarentaise, are on the short list. Raw milk, to make artisanal cheese, under intensive, managed grazing. An open access to mountain pastures, or, in the alternative, a more intensive 20 acres in an alpine region - this is the goal. And all the cash flow comes from value-added, retail, cheese, and, should there be a demand for it, raw milk directly from the farm - nothing from wholesale milk, bulk shipped.

It may be impossible - to have access to the alpine land cheap enough to come in with lower capital; poor enough quality to be cheap, but with time, able to be developed into quality forage; with access to a retail demand, within 4 or so hours' radius. But this would be my hope.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover
For tax shelters and play farms for the idle rich, agriculture can be a pleasant diversion
Jazzlover, what of leasing those very lands, to keep the rich happy in their ag tax breaks, and I do the actual work? Not custom grazing, but leasing the land for milk and cheese production?
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