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Old 10-18-2009, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,869 posts, read 102,248,055 times
Reputation: 32940

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magdalena1 View Post
It's ok here, but we don't have mountains here- Vermont is the closest place about 4 hours away, and there is a lot of huminity in the summertime. Nature is a main reason why we think of Colorado. Secondly, with the savings we have, we would be able to afford much more in CO, than here, and we don't like mortgages very much... )Also, I have a feeling that people at mid west live slower than the ones here... It's all about work and money... fine for us now, but we would like to find a nice, safe place to start a family and feel that Colorado is the one...

What are your feelings about it?
First of all, you'll get a lot of people angry referring to Colorado as the midwest. It may be the middle of the country, but it certainly isn't midwestern culturally.

Secondly, the "slower pace of life" is somewhat of a myth. Everyone has to work, and work is work. There's plenty of "Keeping up with the Joneses", here as everywhere else. Among the young, which I take you to be, it's more about how many 14ers you've climbed, how many double-blacks you've skiied, which running shoes you wear, than about your stock portfolio, but it's the same song, different verse.
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,832,501 times
Reputation: 9316
IMO, place is only one factror among many as to wether or not a persons life is about work and money. I think that has more to do with the luck of the draw ( being born into a family of means ) or spending a portion of your life working your butt off or successfully investing until you accumulate enough money that money is no longer an issue. When you've reached that point, then you have the option to slow down and shift your focus elsewhere. Certainly, a person can live somewhat slower by living a simpler, less materialistic life, but that can be done most anywhere. Living in Colorado will in no way guarantee a slower paced life and/or a lesser focus on work and money. In the current economy, exactly the opposite is more likely to occurr. Not having a job, or having 3 or 4 very low paying jobs can make a person even more focused on work and money.

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 10-18-2009 at 09:19 AM..
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Old 10-18-2009, 06:21 PM
 
135 posts, read 393,707 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
I wouldn't move unless at least one of you has a job here.

To me it seems like finding a job as a nanny in a brand new place right off the bat would be unlikely. I have young kids, and I'm trying to imagine hiring a nanny who doesn't know the area very well. I'd be hesitant. Having something else to fall back on would be a good idea.
Hi,
Thanks for the response. I wouldnt want to be a nanny anymore. That's the point. I have a college degree in science-computer software, and I do what I do here simply because I've been with this family for the last 7 years, plus it's a well paid job. Thinking about Colorado, I hope to get a job at the office, and I totally agree with you -it would be nice if at least one of us had a job there. What are perspectives for an office job? Entry level for now?

Thanks again,
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Old 10-18-2009, 06:32 PM
 
135 posts, read 393,707 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
IMO, place is only one factror among many as to wether or not a persons life is about work and money. I think that has more to do with the luck of the draw ( being born into a family of means ) or spending a portion of your life working your butt off or successfully investing until you accumulate enough money that money is no longer an issue. When you've reached that point, then you have the option to slow down and shift your focus elsewhere. Certainly, a person can live somewhat slower by living a simpler, less materialistic life, but that can be done most anywhere. Living in Colorado will in no way guarantee a slower paced life and/or a lesser focus on work and money. In the current economy, exactly the opposite is more likely to occurr. Not having a job, or having 3 or 4 very low paying jobs can make a person even more focused on work and money.
I can agree with some of the things that you have written. Work and money, materialistic way of life etc. of course you can work a lot here in CT, and CO. What I was trying to write is that comparing prices of goods, real estate, taxes- CO is much cheaper than CT. And having some savings will let us have a better start in CO than here. Although the main factor for us thinking about CO is the nature, we do want to live slower, but still have a luxury of having a nice place, which we couldnt be able to afford here.
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Old 10-18-2009, 07:44 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,521,507 times
Reputation: 7597
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magdalena1 View Post
I can agree with some of the things that you have written. Work and money, materialistic way of life etc. of course you can work a lot here in CT, and CO. What I was trying to write is that comparing prices of goods, real estate, taxes- CO is much cheaper than CT. And having some savings will let us have a better start in CO than here. Although the main factor for us thinking about CO is the nature, we do want to live slower, but still have a luxury of having a nice place, which we couldnt be able to afford here.
IMHO based on what I have witnessed from living in both states, I think living where you will need to in Colorado to have decent employment, the housing costs, if slightly cheaper than CT, will be balanced out by lower wages. Having shopped recently in CT and CO at supermarkets for instance, the costs of goods is quite high compared to where I live now.

I think you might save a small amount on taxes, but not a huge amount.

Ultimately I'd pick Colorado for other reasons outside of financial, because I think when all the sums are added up you wont come out ahead by a large margin and might be worse off.

I think a lot of people dream of small town Colorado but I don't find the same types of small towns that I enjoy in CT. Most small towns in Colorado are in high elevation cold mountains or wind swept prairies. Most towns economy is either skiing, agriculture or mining. The vast majority of Colorados population lives in urban cities.

Not to knock Colorado cause it is a home state to me, but I left because I could not have a balanced quality of life. Not the best wages, very high cost of housing and goods and services, taxes not the greatest and so on. Living in northern PA now I work 1/4 the hours in a year I did in Colorado(yes that is correct, 25% of the hours I used to work in Colorado) but make the same annual income, I have four seasons and a very balanced life. And taxes and goods and services are dirt cheap. And the nice thing is I can visit Colorado anytime I want and I did last week.

So I wouldn't put you off it, but I'd go into it eyes wide open, spend some time there first as well. In Colorado the grass might not be green but brown on the other side of the fence.
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:04 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,772,192 times
Reputation: 9132
There seems to be more and more of these types posts from young people hoping to live some dream in Colorado. That's kind of sad, in a way, because the idealized dream many of them espouse--slower pace of life, bucolic small towns, etc.--has not really existed in most of Colorado for a long time, and especially not now. The people who can most readily avail themselves of that "relaxed" lifestyle are people who are financially independent and absolutely non-reliant on the local economy. Of course, those people can live most anywhere they want. Those financially secure souls are not the young ideologues continually making these posts.

For young job-seekers, Colorado is no panacea. First, there are plenty of other young ideologues already here--chasing the few decent jobs available these days. Second, Colorado is no longer an industrial powerhouse--it never was, but--again--especially not now. Its economy has been over reliant on the service economy for a long time--especially outside of the metro areas--and has the lousy wages to show for it. Third, like most of the Mountain West, Colorado has a schizophrenic population geography--that is, the majority of the population living in sprawled, often poorly planned, automobile-dependent suburban blobs; the remainder of the population scattered around the state in overpriced resorts, resource-extraction-dependent boom-bust towns, a few agricultural communities, and a few towns with an economic base of transfer payments coming to a large population of pensioners and retirees.

One of the most disturbing things about these threads is the absolutely glaring geographical ignorance of a good chunk of the US population--especially young people these days. The inane questions posted here show that in spades all the time. Never has their been such extensive geographical information at the public's fingertips, and yet Americans are more ignorant than ever about their own geography. And--geography matters.
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:13 PM
 
135 posts, read 393,707 times
Reputation: 43
You definately can say a lot more about CO than I do based on your experiences. Thanks for your opinion, I will keep it in mind. I must say that in CT prices are different if you shop in the Hartford area, and lets say in Greenwich CT. I bet that must be the same in CO. The key point is to find the place that we will feel like home.For now we try to get as much information about CO as possible. I don't think we would like to stay in small village somewhere in the mountains... ideally I'd like to be close to the city- Denver for example- like 45 min away, but live in nice, small town, just like we have it here-40min away form Manhattan, but still away from all the crowd...
I've heard that PA is a good state to live. How is a job market there? Administrative assistant? Restaurant business? Maybe you ca tell me how much is it to rent a place for a restaurant? My boyfriend is rather desperate to try it...either this , or mobile kitchen- hot dogs , hamburgers etc...
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:21 PM
 
Location: here
24,839 posts, read 29,965,934 times
Reputation: 32387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magdalena1 View Post
Hi,
Thanks for the response. I wouldnt want to be a nanny anymore. That's the point. I have a college degree in science-computer software, and I do what I do here simply because I've been with this family for the last 7 years, plus it's a well paid job. Thinking about Colorado, I hope to get a job at the office, and I totally agree with you -it would be nice if at least one of us had a job there. What are perspectives for an office job? Entry level for now?

Thanks again,
I really have no idea. I have been a stay at home mom since we moved here 3 years ago. Good luck!
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:34 PM
 
135 posts, read 393,707 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
There seems to be more and more of these types posts from young people hoping to live some dream in Colorado. That's kind of sad, in a way, because the idealized dream many of them espouse--slower pace of life, bucolic small towns, etc.--has not really existed in most of Colorado for a long time, and especially not now. The people who can most readily avail themselves of that "relaxed" lifestyle are people who are financially independent and absolutely non-reliant on the local economy. Of course, those people can live most anywhere they want. Those financially secure souls are not the young ideologues continually making these posts.

For young job-seekers, Colorado is no panacea. First, there are plenty of other young ideologues already here--chasing the few decent jobs available these days. Second, Colorado is no longer an industrial powerhouse--it never was, but--again--especially not now. Its economy has been over reliant on the service economy for a long time--especially outside of the metro areas--and has the lousy wages to show for it. Third, like most of the Mountain West, Colorado has a schizophrenic population geography--that is, the majority of the population living in sprawled, often poorly planned, automobile-dependent suburban blobs; the remainder of the population scattered around the state in overpriced resorts, resource-extraction-dependent boom-bust towns, a few agricultural communities, and a few towns with an economic base of transfer payments coming to a large population of pensioners and retirees.

One of the most disturbing things about these threads is the absolutely glaring geographical ignorance of a good chunk of the US population--especially young people these days. The inane questions posted here show that in spades all the time. Never has their been such extensive geographical information at the public's fingertips, and yet Americans are more ignorant than ever about their own geography. And--geography matters.

WOW!! That's an optimistic view!!! First of, if we are talking about American geography...I feel like I have a right not to know everything...I've been in the United States for only 7 years- all that time in CT, so... I'd like to be corrected if I wrote something about Colorado that isn't correct geographycally...(I'm not sure about that one-so go ahead and fix it for me too , please). Writing this thread I don't expect you to know a lot about my country, yet alone Europe...georaphy, politics, religions and so on...

Secondly, I don't feel like I'm one of "young ideologues" , the fact that I ask questions about the state that I'm planning to live in is simply bacause I hope to get some answers here, and try to understand how it is to live there.

So here... I'd appreciate if you can answer some real questions here instead of saying how bad it is...
Where would you say would be the best place to open up the restaurant?
How much is it to rent a place?
If you had a budget of $60,000 where would you invest it? What business/ place?

Thanks a lot,
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Old 10-18-2009, 08:43 PM
 
135 posts, read 393,707 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkb0305 View Post
I really have no idea. I have been a stay at home mom since we moved here 3 years ago. Good luck!
I'm assuming that you live in CO?

How do you like it?

Thanks,
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