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Old 12-28-2009, 11:58 PM
 
4,981 posts, read 5,034,141 times
Reputation: 6317

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Quote:
Those programs were no panacea, but they sure beat the hell of our current welfare and unemployment system. Of course, they did actually expect people to work . . . what a concept.
WII was a panacea, once capitalist systems spits out significant chunk of population, it takes a disaster/war to put them back to work. Why? A person without a job i.e. $ is an empty space for free market, his/her demand for goods and services doesn't really count. Unemployed segment of population, as a rule, owns no means of production, no mineral rights, no arable land, etc. all they got are their wage slaving arses to sell. They got to sell their arses (to people with $) in order to eat, they can't feed themselves directly without a propertied middleman.

Employed segment of population for better or worse satisfies "employed (&independently wealthy) needs and wants. Sure, if "employed" segment will develop a taste for new goods/services and/or it will increase consumption, a few unemployed will get their lucky ticket to a trough. Unfortunately, recession/depression means that "employed" are less than confident in their employment status to create a new powerful demand for a kinky intimate hairdo or exclusive gecko shiit scooping services.

Another way to boost employment numbers is to create a business out of the things people used to do for free, like giving a ride, growing a vegetable, cooking a dinner or simply pretending to listen. In other words, the more isolated and miserable an American becomes, the greater employment numbers and GDP.

Yet another way to boost employment is to sell more stuff abroad (normally, it takes a war or disaster to generate a stable demand). WWI, WWII, dozens of local wars - USA was selling long before fighting.

Of course, one always could spend more than the rest of the world combined on his own army and piles of soon to be rusted military junk, a little bit of flag waving normally is enough to convince "employed" masses that intergalactic invasion is coming and that they need huge military to defend their sacred way of life. For some weird reason, it's really hard to convince the very same people that they "need" healthy environment, livable cities&towns, less poisons and waste, etc. That would be socialism which is bad.

Did I mention federal, state & local governments and all those piles of laws and regulations. Those are true job creators. In Ohio, you got to regi$ter your dog and your $20 rubber boat. That's at least a few dozens of jobs we are talking about here. Just think what registering of trees in your backyard could do to unemployment numbers.

BTW CCC employed ONLY young men under 30.

 
Old 12-29-2009, 09:20 AM
 
20,811 posts, read 38,977,896 times
Reputation: 18991
MODERATOR SPEAKING: We need to keep this thread focused as much as possible on COLORADO, not national issues.
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Old 12-29-2009, 04:52 PM
 
Location: CO
2,590 posts, read 5,977,238 times
Reputation: 3407
Because it's relevant to this discussion, I've got to post that Money Magazine has declared that Boulder County is the 7th best place in the country to look for a job. The Daily Camera article about it is here:
Money magazine names Boulder County 7th best place to find work - Boulder Daily Camera

The Money Magazine artcle is here:
Money Magazine
Quote:
7. Boulder County, Colo.

Unemployment rate: 5.3%

At the heels of the Rocky Mountains is the beautiful county of Boulder. While many people come for the University of Colorado, graduates stay because of the plentiful job opportunities. Tech firms including IBM, Sun Microsystems and Ball Aerospace are some of Boulder's top employers. IBM recently announced that it's adding another 500 jobs, mostly at the call center at its Boulder facility. . .

Outside of the city, the area's rich agricultural history remains largely unchanged with active farms and mining towns that date back to the 1800s.
The idiocy of that last sentence, saying "Outside of the city, the area's rich agricultural history remains largely unchanged with active farms and mining towns that date back to the 1800s" points out perfectly that we probably shouldn't give Money Magazines's picks much credence.

Boulder County outside of the city is unchanged with active farms and mining towns? Not the Boulder County in which I live. Anybody here know of any present day mining towns in Boulder County? Louisville, Lafayette, and Superior are certainly still in Boulder County, but does anyone know of any mining going on in those towns that I'm missing? How about all those active farms?

Please note, I've lived in Boulder/Boulder County for many years, and I love where I live, but the way Money Magazine promotes and lionizes various Boulder County communities drives me nuts.

Last edited by suzco; 12-29-2009 at 05:54 PM..
 
Old 12-29-2009, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,804 posts, read 102,103,104 times
Reputation: 32917
^^^I agree with the comments about Boulder County. I think the last mines in Louisville closed some time in the 1950s, from what I have read. There is coal burning underground on the Marshall Mesa, but it's not being mined. There are few active farms that I know of, that are actually producing much.

Outside of the city of Boulder much has changed, even in the past 30 years. When we moved to Louisville in 1982, it had a population of 5000 people. Now it's about 20,000. Broomfield expanded and became its own county. Niwot changed from a little farming town to general suburbia. Superior was a tiny town of a few hundred people in the early 80s. Now it has 9000 people.

Sun Microsystems isn't even in Boulder County, let alone Boulder, and they have gone through some major layoffs in the recent past.

Money Magazine is nuts.
 
Old 12-29-2009, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,731,687 times
Reputation: 1696
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzco View Post
Please note, I've lived in Boulder/Boulder County for many years, and I love where I live, but the way Money Magazine promotes and lionizes various Boulder County communities drives me nuts.
The way Money Magazine promotes and lionizes dangerous risky investments drives me nuts, too. They should call it "Sheeple Magazine" instead.
 
Old 12-29-2009, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,170 posts, read 20,923,155 times
Reputation: 4252
This is good news for the local and state economy as KOAA out of Pueblo just reported that the Pueblo city council approved a deal that would allow Black Hills energy to build a 500 million dollar power complex next year. It would have 2 natural gas power plants and be built north of the airport. They will, also, build a new road and make the industrial park even bigger to allow more companies to move here and give the city 7.5 million dollars this year as a incentive on the taxes it will collect so next year as the economy improves the tabor limit wont affect Pueblo as much. Black Hills wants to build it to make sure Pueblo and Colorado has enough power for the anticipated growth in the near future.

Last edited by Josseppie; 12-30-2009 at 12:03 AM..
 
Old 12-30-2009, 12:35 AM
 
9,830 posts, read 19,498,787 times
Reputation: 7596
Well I hear from friends in Vail, business is a little better than last year and tips are a bit nicer as well. Also work has been more steady, much of it balanced out however by cutting 30% of the new seasonal hires.

One thing is clear though from the conversations I've had is that a new paradigm exists and the huge boom in real estate construction and development is over, probably for a generation. The ski resorts will still get business but things have changed.
 
Old 12-30-2009, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,815,081 times
Reputation: 9316
Bob from Down South wrote:
The way Money Magazine promotes and lionizes dangerous risky investments drives me nuts, too. They should call it "Sheeple Magazine" instead.
How about $heeple Magazine!
 
Old 01-05-2010, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,170 posts, read 20,923,155 times
Reputation: 4252
If Pueblo can get this project started in 2010 then not only will it help the Pueblo economy and make us one of the largest counties in Colorado but the entire state.

Don Gillispie, AEHI's CEO, left today for Seoul to finalize negotiations with Korean Electric Power Company, KEPCO, to import the South Korean's advanced reactor, APR 1400, for its Idaho and Colorado sites.

The link: http://www.istockanalyst.com/article/viewiStockNews/articleid/3749238 (broken link)

When it says Colorado site they mean the proposed Colorado Energy Park east of Pueblo that is 21,000 acers and could mean up to 20,000 primary jobs.

EDIT: My bad I did not have the right link, it is on now. I will keep everyone posted on the progress as this will have a huge impact in the Colorado economy if/when it's devloped.

Last edited by Josseppie; 01-05-2010 at 08:06 PM..
 
Old 01-05-2010, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,731,687 times
Reputation: 1696
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
If Pueblo can get this project started in 2010 then not only will it help the Pueblo economy and make us one of the largest counties in Colorado but the entire state.

Don Gillispie, AEHI's CEO, left today for Seoul to finalize negotiations with Korean Electric Power Company, KEPCO, to import the South Korean's advanced reactor, APR 1400, for its Idaho and Colorado sites.

The link: http://www.istockanalyst.com/article...icleid/3749238

When it says Colorado site they mean the proposed Colorado Energy Park east of Pueblo that is 21,000 acers and could mean up to 20,000 primary jobs.

Yawn...pure propaganda. In fact they've already yanked the page with this non-story from their server.

The idea of "finalizing" negotiations on a nuke plant that doesn't have anything even remotely resembling NRC approval is just more pumpmonkey horse****.

21,000 acers? That's a lot of cheap laptops.
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