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Old 10-22-2009, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,871 posts, read 102,258,726 times
Reputation: 32945

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
First, you need to decide what is more important to you--socializing, biking, snowboarding, etc., or getting a first-rate education. If I were paying Colorado's high (and probably soon to be higher) out-of-state tuition rates, I would be working toward the latter. For engineering, Colorado School of Mines has by far the best reputation. For getting a job after graduation, it is the "E" ticket. However, most Mines students will tell that they don't have a rousing social and recreation life--they just don't have time. CU and CSU are OK schools, and a self-disciplined student can get a good education at either one--but both, CU especially, have wide reputations as "party" schools that do not necessarily impress prospective employers. A couple of other schools in the region you might consider are the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology--both pretty good schools near some nice country.
I disagree with your assessment of CU and CSU as "OK" schools. Even though CU has a reputation as a party school, it is so big that one can generally find a group of like-minded friends. CSM has fraternities and sororities so I don't think it's true they spend all their time hitting the books. I have several friends whose kids have gone there who would agree with me. For engineering, I'd go with CU; it's my personal opinion that you get a more rounded education there.
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Old 10-22-2009, 06:17 PM
 
Location: CO
2,591 posts, read 5,985,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
First, you need to decide what is more important to you--socializing, biking, snowboarding, etc., or getting a first-rate education. If I were paying Colorado's high (and probably soon to be higher) out-of-state tuition rates, I would be working toward the latter. For engineering, Colorado School of Mines has by far the best reputation. For getting a job after graduation, it is the "E" ticket. However, most Mines students will tell that they don't have a rousing social and recreation life--they just don't have time. CU and CSU are OK schools, and a self-disciplined student can get a good education at either one--but both, CU especially, have wide reputations as "party" schools that do not necessarily impress prospective employers. A couple of other schools in the region you might consider are the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology--both pretty good schools near some nice country.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I disagree with your assessment of CU and CSU as "OK" schools. Even though CU has a reputation as a party school, it is so big that one can generally find a group of like-minded friends. CSM has fraternities and sororities so I don't think it's true they spend all their time hitting the books. I have several friends whose kids have gone there who would agree with me. For engineering, I'd go with CU; it's my personal opinion that you get a more rounded education there.
I sure agree with Katiana about the assessment of CU and CSU.

CU and CSU may have reputations as party schools, but for my kids and their friends, (though it's true, they're Colorado kids through and through), graduating from either of those schools (or for that matter, any and all of the Colorado schools, including CSM, Western State, Ft Lewis, etc.) was a definite advantage.

When they interviewed for jobs, were networking, many of the people they were talking to were themselves graduates of our just fine Colorado schools. Being graduates of CU, etc. worked to their advantage, it was certainly not a negative.
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Old 10-22-2009, 06:31 PM
 
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alrights thanks everybody. would it be smart, if i were to go to cu, to get housing outside the city of boulder in some cheaper areas?
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Old 10-22-2009, 06:33 PM
 
11 posts, read 19,836 times
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oh and im pretty sure cu is my only option because i am wanting to stay in aerospace engineering. if you know of any other colorado schools with that aerospace besides cu colorado springs, let me know. to what extent will cu give financial aid? i am 18 and am financially independent.
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Old 10-22-2009, 06:42 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,774,765 times
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If you are planning to work in Colorado, a degree from one of the Colorado colleges or universities (with a decent GPA and a major for which there is some demand) is an advantage. I'm a grad of Western State, and I feel that I got a first-rate education there.

That said, if one is planning to work elsewhere, probably no public Colorado college has the good national reputation that the Colorado School of Mines enjoys. CSM has a good enough reputation that it probably has the one of the highest percentages of foreign students attending it of any Colorado institution of higher learning.

Really, too, the key is the motivation of the student. College is very much what one makes of it--it's possible to be a complete screw-off at a "prestigious" college and get no benefit from the education there, and it's possible to get a great education at an "average" college.

The big thing the OP needs to think about is that out-of-state tuition. If he or she is paying that just to go to school away from his or her home state--and not because the school in Colorado (or whatever) offers a better education--well, that's just plain dumb. Especially if it's being paid for with borrowed money.

I could have borrowed money and gone to school out of state when I went to college. Instead, I chose to stay in state, and worked enough during summers and breaks to pay for my education as I went. I graduated without a student loan to pay back. So did my roommate. He went on to get a Masters on his own nickel. I will agree with Kat--my Colorado college education has served me just fine.
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Old 10-22-2009, 07:09 PM
 
Location: SW Colorado
147 posts, read 560,104 times
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Just attended college night with my son at his high school last week. He is interested in engineering so we spoke with all of the schools with engineering programs that were there. Here are some cost of attendance figures for an out-of-state student that I am taking from the 2009-1010 Collegiate Handbook (tuition, fees, room and board, books and supplies for a non-resident):


Colorado State University: $31,653

University of Colorado: $38,564

Colorado School of Mines: $35,824

and

South Dakota School of Mines: $15,240 (bargain!!)


Having worked at CU for several years, I am very familiar with the excellent quality of professors and the programs offered. However, I do agree with Jazz that Mines is the ticket for a guaranteed job after graduation especially if the major is in mining, metallurgical, or petroleum engineering.

Just saw that the OP is interested in Aerospace Engineering. It is also offered at the CU-Denver campus.
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Old 10-22-2009, 07:27 PM
 
Location: CO
2,591 posts, read 5,985,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rlives16 View Post
alrights thanks everybody. would it be smart, if i were to go to cu, to get housing outside the city of boulder in some cheaper areas?
There's plenty of "student housing" rentals in Boulder. The real expense of housing in Boulder is when you buy a house. If you rent in a less expensive area (no area close to Boulder is cheap, even if it's slightly less expensive than Boulder) you will have the hassle and time of commuting. Your CU tuition/fees will include an RTD pass, but if you drive, there will also be parking fees.
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Old 10-22-2009, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,871 posts, read 102,258,726 times
Reputation: 32945
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlives16 View Post
oh and im pretty sure cu is my only option because i am wanting to stay in aerospace engineering. if you know of any other colorado schools with that aerospace besides cu colorado springs, let me know. to what extent will cu give financial aid? i am 18 and am financially independent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzco View Post
There's plenty of "student housing" rentals in Boulder. The real expense of housing in Boulder is when you buy a house. If you rent in a less expensive area (no area close to Boulder is cheap, even if it's slightly less expensive than Boulder) you will have the hassle and time of commuting. Your CU tuition/fees will include an RTD pass, but if you drive, there will also be parking fees.
Too true, and CU is talking about banning parking on campus for students. This topic was in the Daily Camera (local Boulder newspaper) recently. You could do a search on Boulder DailyCamera.com: Colorado, News, Business, Sports, Homes, Jobs, Cars & Information - Boulder Daily Camera. My daughter went to CU and had a car, but usually used it only for off-campus needs. She took the RTD and Buff Bus (campus bus) for on-campus travel.

A great place for students to live is Bear Creek apartments, owned by CU. My daughter lived there one year, and it was great. It was only slightly more expensive than the dumpy apt. she rented the year before, and had lots of amenities such as washer/dryer (coin-op) on each floor, ample parking, good location. Freshmen are required to live in the dorms.
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Old 10-23-2009, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,676 posts, read 9,413,880 times
Reputation: 2896
This is my take on it: companies hiring engineers don't care what school you went to. They care about your skills. If you want to get the best engineering education, you go to School of Mines. Graduate from there and your skills will be competitive anywhere you care to move to.
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Old 10-23-2009, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Bend, OR
3,296 posts, read 8,420,129 times
Reputation: 3321
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
First, you need to decide what is more important to you--socializing, biking, snowboarding, etc., or getting a first-rate education. If I were paying Colorado's high (and probably soon to be higher) out-of-state tuition rates, I would be working toward the latter. For engineering, Colorado School of Mines has by far the best reputation. For getting a job after graduation, it is the "E" ticket. However, most Mines students will tell that they don't have a rousing social and recreation life--they just don't have time. CU and CSU are OK schools, and a self-disciplined student can get a good education at either one--but both, CU especially, have wide reputations as "party" schools that do not necessarily impress prospective employers. A couple of other schools in the region you might consider are the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology--both pretty good schools near some nice country.
I've never had trouble getting a job due to the fact that I attended a "party" school (CSU). While I don't have a degree in engineering, I do have a science degree (as does my husband), I think CSU is a great school. Yes School of Mines is probably the best for engineering, but not everyone can get in. Also, just because you attend a "party" school, doesn't necessarily mean that everyone who attends is the "partying" type. To me that is the equivalent of calling all southerners rednecks or whatever stupid stereotype comes to mind. Honestly, I think you can get a great education at any school you choose. You just have to make sure you don't fall into the "partying" too much!
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