U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-23-2009, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,876 posts, read 102,269,915 times
Reputation: 32945

Advertisements

I do not necessarily agree that CSM is the "best" place to go for engineering. CU requires 18 credit hours of humanities education, CSM appears to require two courses (6-8 cr. hrs). CSM students are not even required to take writing courses.

Humanities and Social Science Requirements | College of Engineering & Applied Science| University of Colorado at Boulder

http://engineering.mines.edu/image/what-it-takes/15-civil_flowchart_2007-08.pdf (broken link)

http://engineering.colorado.edu/acad...iers/Civil.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-23-2009, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,676 posts, read 9,415,476 times
Reputation: 2896
That's because instead of writing and humanities courses, you're required to take geology and other science/engineering classes.

I wasn't saying it's a well-rounded education. I'm saying it's the most intense engineering education you can get. I would put it on par with any of the top engineering schools in the country (Caltech, MIT). If you graduate with an engineering degree from CSM you're gonna know your stuff.

You can get a decent engineering education from UC-Boulder. There's nothing wrong with it. My former boss at NCAR took his Ph.D. in pure math from Boulder. He talked about it as being one of the best pure math programs in the world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I do not necessarily agree that CSM is the "best" place to go for engineering. CU requires 18 credit hours of humanities education, CSM appears to require two courses (6-8 cr. hrs). CSM students are not even required to take writing courses.

Humanities and Social Science Requirements | College of Engineering & Applied Science| University of Colorado at Boulder

http://engineering.mines.edu/image/what-it-takes/15-civil_flowchart_2007-08.pdf (broken link)

http://engineering.colorado.edu/acad...iers/Civil.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2009, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,876 posts, read 102,269,915 times
Reputation: 32945
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
That's because instead of writing and humanities courses, you're required to take geology and other science/engineering classes.

I wasn't saying it's a well-rounded education. I'm saying it's the most intense engineering education you can get. I would put it on par with any of the top engineering schools in the country (Caltech, MIT). If you graduate with an engineering degree from CSM you're gonna know your stuff.

You can get a decent engineering education from UC-Boulder. There's nothing wrong with it. My former boss at NCAR took his Ph.D. in pure math from Boulder. He talked about it as being one of the best pure math programs in the world.
Are you saying CU-Boulder doesn't require those courses? You apparently didn't look at the links I provided. Maybe they just require more credits.

US News doesn't agree with you. According to the 2005 edition, the most recent one I have, they rank MIT#1, Cal Tech #4, CU #33, CSM #50, and CSU # 60. While I don't always agree 100% with US News, I think they usually get it in the ballpark.

My DH went to Cal Tech and tried to convince a neighbor kid who was considering both Cal Tech and CSM to go to Cal Tech; one of the things he felt strongly about was that Cal Tech also encourages humanities. DH developed a love for Shakespeare from a course he took at Cal Tech.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2009, 12:38 PM
 
229 posts, read 670,854 times
Reputation: 249
One of the advantages of the larger state schools is that there is more awareness and recognition nationally in case you leave the region and work somewhere else. Maybe its sad that someone in New Jersey is aware of CU because of their football team, but its also easy to identify the flagship universities in the various states. On the flip side, I could give you a list of outstanding regional colleges that people in the mountain west have probably never heard of. The School of Mines is a fantastic school and has a great regional reputation, but I'm not sure that carries as well nationally as CU or CSU - if that matters to you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2009, 08:30 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,777,680 times
Reputation: 9132
Quote:
Originally Posted by movementarian View Post
One of the advantages of the larger state schools is that there is more awareness and recognition nationally in case you leave the region and work somewhere else. Maybe its sad that someone in New Jersey is aware of CU because of their football team, but its also easy to identify the flagship universities in the various states. On the flip side, I could give you a list of outstanding regional colleges that people in the mountain west have probably never heard of. The School of Mines is a fantastic school and has a great regional reputation, but I'm not sure that carries as well nationally as CU or CSU - if that matters to you.
Sorry, that's nonsense. In the geology/energy/engineering field, Colorado School of Mines doesn't just have a great national reputation, it is has a WORLDWIDE reputation. A friend of mine spent years working in the in Mideast oil fields (he was a CSM grad)--he was amazed how many Saudis and Kuwaitis that he worked with were CSM grads.

By the way, I'm not plugging CSM because I ever attended there (I didn't)--but I know from the CSM grads that I have worked with that it is a first-rate college on a par in its selected fields with the best schools in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2009, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,676 posts, read 9,415,476 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
US News doesn't agree with you. According to the 2005 edition, the most recent one I have, they rank MIT#1, Cal Tech #4, CU #33, CSM #50, and CSU # 60. While I don't always agree 100% with US News, I think they usually get it in the ballpark.
They're obviously not ranking it on the basis of engineering alone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2009, 12:31 PM
 
229 posts, read 670,854 times
Reputation: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Sorry, that's nonsense. In the geology/energy/engineering field, Colorado School of Mines doesn't just have a great national reputation, it is has a WORLDWIDE reputation. A friend of mine spent years working in the in Mideast oil fields (he was a CSM grad)--he was amazed how many Saudis and Kuwaitis that he worked with were CSM grads.

By the way, I'm not plugging CSM because I ever attended there (I didn't)--but I know from the CSM grads that I have worked with that it is a first-rate college on a par in its selected fields with the best schools in the US.
Its not nonsense. I'm not knocking CSM's educational merits, just casting doubt on its high recognition outside the region. Its smaller and more specialized. It probably does have good recognition in the oil fields of the Middle East or the mines of Kazakhstan. CU will have more awareness in Manhattan or Los Angeles. And it is possibly something to consider.

Here is a ranking of graduate engineer schools - which often means strength in their undergrad schools.
Rankings - Best Engineering Schools - Graduate Schools - Education - US News and World Report

CU looks to be in the same tier as CSM and as the poster's Univ of TN. Honestly, he probably couldn't go wrong in studying Aerospace engineering at any one of those schools.

And if there is any doubt about the quality of CU's Aerospace engineering - Aerospace Engineering Sciences | University of Colorado at Boulder
The graduate specialty program in aerospace engineering is ranked 12th overall and 7th among public graduate programs in the most recent U.S. News & World Report rankings. Our undergraduate program is ranked 16th overall and 11th among public undergraduate programs in aerospace engineering (2010 rankings).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2009, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,676 posts, read 9,415,476 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by movementarian View Post
Its not nonsense. I'm not knocking CSM's educational merits, just casting doubt on its high recognition outside the region.
Okay normally I don't post multiple times on the same thread, but you're pushing a point that's wrong. I'm an engineer and I can tell you for a fact that any scientist and engineer in the U.S. knows about the School of Mines. They've heard about its reputation. They know that it's a tough school that produces high quality grads.
Saying otherwise is simply flat out wrong.

It doesn't have a reputation outside of the science/engineering field, but if you're going to school to be an engineer with the intention of working as one after you graduate, why would you care?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2009, 03:22 PM
 
229 posts, read 670,854 times
Reputation: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
It doesn't have a reputation outside of the science/engineering field, but if you're going to school to be an engineer with the intention of working as one after you graduate, why would you care?
Because engineers work with other people that aren't engineers. And engineers don't always stay in the engineering field. And because CU has a very strong program in the exact field the poster is looking to study. Four year college can easily cost over $60k - so it is not a small investment when one is paying for it himself (like the poster is). Imagine a few possible scenarios - first, the poster decides he doesn't like science or engineering after a year or two and wants to switch to something else entirely - can he choose something else at whatever school or does he have to transfer? Suppose an engineering student from TN decides to move back to southeast when he is finished school. Does the school carry the same awareness/prestige in Denver as say a strong engineering school in his area like a Virginia Tech or Georgia Tech?

Look, I'm not out to dump on CSM. I know CSM is a fantastic school and has a deservedly great reputation as possibly the best school in the state. I just know the big states schools like CU and CSU also carry good reputations and are fairly known nationally - while it is a little harder for a solid, high-quality school like CSM to get that every-man brand awareness when it isn't the major state university (or have some crappy football or basketball team). Maybe the School of Mines should put together a bball team like Gonzaga...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:34 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top