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Old 11-09-2009, 11:59 PM
 
4 posts, read 4,349 times
Reputation: 14

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Dear Thinkin' About It,

All the other replies were good, helpful, and heartfelt! Here's my feeling about what you wrote:

Sometimes people find that an area that they're not used to, can grow on them, by returning to the new area a couple of times, after some time of not being there. By doing this, you might see wonderful things that you never noticed, the first time you visited here.

Even if you don't want to move to the mountains (and it's better if the mountains don't get overpopulated, anyway!), you may find that you can enjoy them in a deeper way, if you come back a couple of times, again.

You don't have to feel the same way as others do, who loved the mountains immediately. Accept what you feel, and don't judge yourself by what others feel.

I had a similar experience to you, regarding another area of the U.S. ("redrock" country--won't say the state, as it's already way overcrowded with too many people, which detracts from the experience), when I first saw it, way back in yesteryear. It was no big deal to me, that first time I saw it many years ago. Perhaps I was overwhelmed with how different it looked, compared with scenery that I was used to.

But, when I returned, some years later, I saw the place in an entirely different light, the second time I went. I went "gaga", and couldn't believe how indifferent I had been the first time. Now I love that high desert country, and make "pilgrimages" there, yearly.

And, I live in the mountains (have been here in the Colorado mountains for over 30 years), that I dearly love (I ski, and walk, and hike, and look, and drink in the beauty, and listen to the quiet, the animal & bird sounds, watch the changing skies, breathe in fresh air, look at the beautiful plants and rocks, and trees, and try to be one with nature, try to be in the present, not always thinking of what I have to do next, etc.).

Also, whenever I drive across the country, I see beauty in all kinds of places, that I may not have appreciated a lot, before, such as the prairie, river bluffs, etc.

People change. If you do, great. If not, don't worry. You might change later on, or not. It's OK, whatever you feel!

Carol
Can't Breathe? Suspect Vocal Cord Dysfunction!
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Old 11-10-2009, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,627 posts, read 3,704,904 times
Reputation: 1778
When I lived in Arizona people would ask me why I would go out in to the desert ("there's nothing there!") and what did I do out there? I actually did a fair amount of cataloging of flora and fauna, often making my own maps and doing some rather amateur scientific "research." It was also quite nice to spend the night in a place where you could see stars up above and track the paths of the planets over the months as they crossed the sky, or maybe watch meteor showers or the occasional comet every few years.

I see time in the Colorado mountains in a similar light. In fact, I could do many of the same activities there, only with a completely different variety of biology and geology! Scoping out layers of history in rock outcroppings or taking note of invasive species and how they are affecting the native life in the forests or meadows. There's also running into the history of the people of the area...the old camps and mines and passes up in the mountains, and marveling at the very nature of the Great Divide.

You don't have to write and publish papers to enjoy learning about your environment and being fascinated by the myriad details encompassed in such a vast space...where even a few square feet can be radically different than the same yardage just a couple miles away.

And that's not even mentioning cross country skiing, photography, kayaking, geocaching, hiking, camping, hunting (not my thing, but certainly for others), fishing, biking, climbing, spelunking, exploring, breathing...
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Old 11-10-2009, 02:58 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,814,977 times
Reputation: 13244
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Y'all can keep your mountains and your oceans. I'm all about the Wisconsin Northwoods.
To me, Drover's humorous post says it all--everyone needs his own spot.

The magnificent Rockies are not innately better than the pristine northwest Florida beaches or the prairies of Nebraska nor Wisconsin's northwoods--nor vice versa. The right spot is the right one for YOU.

The OP is trying to *understand* something, and looking for feedback.
Yet I agree with Cynical that the OP should not judge himself by what others feel.

Colorado is very trendy right now--has been for awhile. It is good to be adaptable and curious, but also good to take your time and do some research before making a plunge.

I would not decide about the mountains after one visit to Colorado any more than I would decide about the beach after one visit to California.
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Old 11-10-2009, 04:06 AM
 
13,262 posts, read 25,405,201 times
Reputation: 20226
I believe it was Sir Edmund Hilary who said, "Because it's there" regarding Everest/Sagamartha.
I have plenty of solitude in my life (live alone in the woods with dogs, work third shift). But the sheer massiveness of the mountains just overwhelms me.
I also have a real draw to Zion Park, although no snow-capped peaks.
I can't get past my love for the view of the 10 14,000-foot peaks from Ridgway.
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Old 11-10-2009, 05:52 AM
 
Location: OKLAHOMA
1,783 posts, read 3,596,485 times
Reputation: 939
Everyone has different strokes. I live on a cattle ranch, if you don't enjoy going out on your property and feeding cows and counting them. Filling up feeders and checking things out then you don't belong on a ranch. My relatives from CA visit and they always say, what do you do for fun. That is fun to me. Now for retirement I want the mountains. Just sitting on your porch in the middle of norwhere in high allitude is my things. Going to malls is great once a year only.

Now my husband brother lives on the beach and he could care less about anything else in life but wearing his short and I mean short shorts and running on the sand. That isn't my thing but is his.

If everyone loved the mountains, they would turn into cities. So the rest of us should feel glad about that.

Last edited by Mike from back east; 11-10-2009 at 09:13 AM..
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Old 11-10-2009, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,815,081 times
Reputation: 9316
brightlover wrote:
I believe it was Sir Edmund Hilary who said, "Because it's there" regarding Everest/Sagamartha.
It was actually George Mallory who made that quip. Mallory was a British climber who attempted to reach the summit of Everest ( and perhaps he did ), 30 years ahead of Hillary.
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Old 11-10-2009, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Arizona High Desert
4,638 posts, read 5,077,303 times
Reputation: 2752
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Here's something great about mountains: developing land on mountainous terrain is difficult. So they act as a natural "open space" preserve of sorts.
Mountains collect snow, and the snow melts. I love the San Luis Valley in Colorado. It may sound odd to some people, but the mountains speak to you in a way. I do personally "get it." I love the fact that developers can't ruin them. They are brutal in winter. They should be at that altitude. Mountain valley land is mineral rich. Kit Carson is one of my favorites, and the mountain air is so clean. Mountains are more stable than ever changing cities.
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Old 11-10-2009, 09:15 AM
 
229 posts, read 670,131 times
Reputation: 249
--Beach--
Fishing
boating
water skiing
hitting the pier
surfing
swimming
snorkeling
jet ski
windsurfing
kite boarding
body surfing
boogie boarding
checking out the ladies
hanging out and relaxing

---Mountains---
Road biking
Mountain Biking
Trail Running
Rafting
Kayaking
Skiing
Snowboarding
snoeshoeing
fishing
hunting
rock climbing
canyoneering
paragliding
4-wheeling
hiking
backpacking
tubing
mountaineering

Hell - I'll take either one. I'm not much for the "different strokes for different folks". I guess that's why I live in CO and try to take many of my vacations at the beach. Relatives of mine that live at the beach do the reverse. The feeling you get out surfing on a day when the waves are big and clean is very similar to skiing or boarding on a big powder day.
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Old 11-10-2009, 09:48 AM
 
2,437 posts, read 7,258,827 times
Reputation: 1512
Quote:
Originally Posted by movementarian View Post
'll take either one. I'm not much for the "different strokes for different folks". I guess that's why I live in CO and try to take many of my vacations at the beach. Relatives of mine that live at the beach do the reverse.
Same here. Fortunately I have immediate family and close friends in SD, the SF Bay Area, and Hawaii, so that makes it a lot easier. I have a box of stuff -- everything I need for an extended stay -- stowed away in a secure place on the Big Island, so when I go there I don't even pack first. I just get on a plane with the clothes on my back and a good book. I'm a little spoiled like that, I know, especially now with those cheap arifares which won't last.

Because of the luxury of such travel I can tell you this with 100% certainty. Since I can't have both, the choice between immediate access to unpopulated mountain terrain or a beautiful but crowded tropical or temperate coastline is a very easy one to make.
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,139 posts, read 5,622,632 times
Reputation: 952
Quote:
Originally Posted by movementarian View Post
--Beach--
Fishing
boating
water skiing
hitting the pier
surfing
swimming
snorkeling
jet ski
windsurfing
kite boarding
body surfing
boogie boarding
checking out the ladies
hanging out and relaxing

---Mountains---
Road biking
Mountain Biking
Trail Running
Rafting
Kayaking
Skiing
Snowboarding
snoeshoeing
fishing
hunting
rock climbing
canyoneering
paragliding
4-wheeling
hiking
backpacking
tubing
mountaineering

Hell - I'll take either one. I'm not much for the "different strokes for different folks". I guess that's why I live in CO and try to take many of my vacations at the beach. Relatives of mine that live at the beach do the reverse. The feeling you get out surfing on a day when the waves are big and clean is very similar to skiing or boarding on a big powder day.
You forgot horseback riding.
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