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Old 11-08-2009, 02:32 AM
 
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I just completed a short trip to the mountains mid-state. It was pretty breathtaking visually on the whole, I admit that. But after like 15 minutes, my girlfriend and I were thinking "now what?" What are we missing in our personalities or perspectives that doesn't allow for us to appreciate the mountains in the way many of you do? I hope you can take me at my word in my sincerity here; I'm not bad-mouthing the mountains or Colorado. I just don't get it, and would like to.

For example, the ocean is also stunningly beautiful, but it allows for activities beyond looking at it. Fishing, boating, water skiing, hitting the pier, surfing, etc. Mountains, from what I can tell, you just kinda look at-then, well, I dunno? I guess you can walk through them and take pictures?

What am I missing? What do the mountains do for you? Thanks for sharing.
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Old 11-08-2009, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
302 posts, read 773,157 times
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Have you tried hiking in the mountains? Or camping? When you reach a pier or plateau, the views/pictures can be great.
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Old 11-08-2009, 03:15 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,178 posts, read 8,047,864 times
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If you are young and healthy, or even older and healthy, take a hike up in those mountains and do some exploring.
You will see nature and wildlife and scenery at its best.
Or you might just see some of the most beautiful sunsets and sunrises you've ever seen and changing colors of light.
You might see a storm coming over the peaks, or you might be in a cloud looking down and seeing the sun on another mountain side.
Looking at them and experiencing them are two diffierent things.
It all depends on what you like.
The sea is beautiful and inviting.
So are the mountains if you give them a chance to show their wonders in person.
I don't live in Colorado but I have relatives there and in Utah and have been in the mountains. I enjoy the quiet solitude and peace and mother natures gift of the mountains.
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Old 11-08-2009, 03:24 AM
 
5,617 posts, read 13,727,383 times
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every slob in a speedo can fish, walk a pier, swim, water ski most people dont do, or surf ( lay on something that floats and ride a wave), boat so on. Not every slob can hike up a mountain!!! I have hiked some of the most beautiful moutain tops. You get a book find the trail head and start up the mountain. You can see for miles of nothing but beautiful green and alpine forests. Add all different types of plants, trees and rocks. The problem is is HARD WORK TO hike a mountain this weeds out the slobs.
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Old 11-08-2009, 03:24 AM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,892 posts, read 5,260,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkin about it View Post
I just completed a short trip to the mountains mid-state. It was pretty breathtaking visually on the whole, I admit that. But after like 15 minutes, my girlfriend and I were thinking "now what?" What are we missing in our personalities or perspectives that doesn't allow for us to appreciate the mountains in the way many of you do? I hope you can take me at my word in my sincerity here; I'm not bad-mouthing the mountains or Colorado. I just don't get it, and would like to.

For example, the ocean is also stunningly beautiful, but it allows for activities beyond looking at it. Fishing, boating, water skiing, hitting the pier, surfing, etc. Mountains, from what I can tell, you just kinda look at-then, well, I dunno? I guess you can walk through them and take pictures?

What am I missing? What do the mountains do for you? Thanks for sharing.
Realise that you are asking others to reflect on your own limitations...

I did enjoy "hitting the pier" as a counterpoint! LOL!

A suggestion: Participate in the mountains! You mentioned "looking" at the mountains versus participating at the ocean. If you participate in activities offered by the mountains, my guess is that you will have a deeper appreciation of why certain people are drawn to the mountains and others are unable to do so without a different idea of courage and risk.

My guess is that you actually did surf, then you wouldn't need to ask your questions as the answer would be self-evident.

S.
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Old 11-08-2009, 03:33 AM
 
770 posts, read 745,755 times
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So walking in the mountains is supposed to be where it's at? I did that. Walking=+/-looking at it. I dunno? I tried to participate in them, I just don't know what to do other than...walk, and hope to see a neato animal or something.


I guess there is nothing you can really quantify or pin down either way on these kinds of things. Maybe there is something mystical about the mountains that other people feel that I just don't, and that's all that can really be said?

Perhaps this was kind of a silly question. Sorry if it was.

EDIT: Yes, I went hiking for a few hours. That is what I meant by "looking at" the mountains. I should have clarified that a bit.
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Old 11-08-2009, 03:34 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 88,978,619 times
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Here's something great about mountains: developing land on mountainous terrain is difficult. So they act as a natural "open space" preserve of sorts.
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Old 11-08-2009, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,227 posts, read 24,308,543 times
Reputation: 12937
Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkin about it View Post
I just completed a short trip to the mountains mid-state. It was pretty breathtaking visually on the whole, I admit that. But after like 15 minutes, my girlfriend and I were thinking "now what?" What are we missing in our personalities or perspectives that doesn't allow for us to appreciate the mountains in the way many of you do? I hope you can take me at my word in my sincerity here; I'm not bad-mouthing the mountains or Colorado. I just don't get it, and would like to.

For example, the ocean is also stunningly beautiful, but it allows for activities beyond looking at it. Fishing, boating, water skiing, hitting the pier, surfing, etc. Mountains, from what I can tell, you just kinda look at-then, well, I dunno? I guess you can walk through them and take pictures?

What am I missing? What do the mountains do for you? Thanks for sharing.
For example, the mountains are stunningly beautiful, and they allow for activities beyond looking at them. Fishing, boating, water skiing, SNOW SKIING, SNOWBOARDING, etc. Oceans, from what I can tell, you just kinda look at then, well, I dunno? I guess you can walk next to it and take pictures?

Okay, I was being facetious. I feel about oceans the same way you feel about mountains. Swimming and boogie-boarding are fun, but they aren't things I need to do all the time, nor do I need to be near the ocean all the time to be happy.

The reason the Colorado mountains are so special is because outdoor activities, world-class ski resorts, and the elite-class lifestyle are important to some people. My own personal vice is mountainous/hilly pine forests. Somebody could lecture me until they are blue in the face about the detriments to living in a said type of place, and I would still ooze with envy at the people who live in such a place.

You could hand me the keys to a mansion on the beach, and I wouldn't be satisfied, because I'd be longing for a small century-old house with views of a hilly/mountainy forest.

Different strokes is all.

Last edited by Count David; 11-08-2009 at 04:49 AM..
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Old 11-08-2009, 05:34 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,382 posts, read 40,848,340 times
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IMHO it really is different strokes for different folks.
Both landscapes offer opportunities for reflection as well as activity.
Both places offer beauty, fresh air and a rejuvenating experience.

I spent my early formative years on both coasts.
I moved to Colorado as a teen.
I always loved just looking at the mountains. I could see Red Rocks every day.
Still, I was a swimmer, I always preferred the water, while both my brothers, husband, and both my sons skied and snowboarded.

Accessibility matters, as well as cost.
It is not cheap to ski or snowboard.
I-70 can sometimes be like a parking lot. Ownership of a cabin in the woods?
Almost an impossible dream these days, though I have friends who achieved it.
But hiking is free, just as swimming at the beach is, or fishing. The mountains are not going to go away, and development is indeed limited.

Where I live the beach is minutes away, and there are pine forests along the coast.
But no Red Rocks.
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Old 11-08-2009, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,227 posts, read 24,308,543 times
Reputation: 12937
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
Accessibility matters, as well as cost.
It is not cheap to ski or snowboard.
I-70 can sometimes be like a parking lot. Ownership of a cabin in the woods?
Almost an impossible dream these days, though I have friends who achieved it.
But hiking is free, just as swimming at the beach is, or fishing. The mountains are not going to go away, and development is indeed limited.

Where I live the beach is minutes away, and there are pine forests along the coast.
But no Red Rocks.
Exactly.

I wouldn't want to live in my "paradise" if I couldn't afford it comfortably. That would quickly turn paradise into hell.

I don't ski or snowboard, and when affordability avails me the opportunity to try either one, I probably will.

At least in my case, I'm going to use Denver for its economic benefits, and go to my affordable paradise when making good money isn't as much of a necessity.

And see, different strokes. Red rocks do nothing for me!
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