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Old 12-06-2009, 02:07 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 5,837,013 times
Reputation: 2615

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In the space of 5 years I doubt you'll be surprised by much that's changed. I have only a passing familiarity with the areas you mentioned, but would surmise you'll see the continuation of the pace of growth you knew of, although effects in foreclosures, etc. of these last two years recession.

In the longer term, Colorado's population of some 5 million is projected to reach 10 million by 2050. I believe it will not due limitations such as water, and unraveling of this State's economy in various ways. But the implications are clear. If moving back, to not expect a perfectly serene ride for the next few decades. Although that might be applied in measure to the better part of this nation and world.

Such changes might be least felt in rural Colorado, probably most in places such as Aurora. Of course in rural Colorado one could still be affected with less river flow, dead forests, etc. If not mistaken, I believe the State has also raised fees on such things as DMV license renewal, in grasping for additional income. Nevertheless, those along the Front Range may bear the brunt of this in increased congestion, pollution, traffic, costs, etc. They will at last, and are, running up against the limits of water supply, and one might expect various types of rationing. Not to mention schemes for uranium mining north of Denver that could very well radiate that huge underlying aquifer.

As far as I'm concerned, Colorado doesn't need any more transplants, but actually a population about a fifth her present size. That doesn't appear likely any time soon. But if those presently here, and those with this their new home, indeed made it their home and cared for this land and all upon her as much, we'd all be better off.
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Old 12-06-2009, 03:38 PM
 
6 posts, read 10,523 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
In the space of 5 years I doubt you'll be surprised by much that's changed. I have only a passing familiarity with the areas you mentioned, but would surmise you'll see the continuation of the pace of growth you knew of, although effects in foreclosures, etc. of these last two years recession.

In the longer term, Colorado's population of some 5 million is projected to reach 10 million by 2050. I believe it will not due limitations such as water, and unraveling of this State's economy in various ways. But the implications are clear. If moving back, to not expect a perfectly serene ride for the next few decades. Although that might be applied in measure to the better part of this nation and world.

Such changes might be least felt in rural Colorado, probably most in places such as Aurora. Of course in rural Colorado one could still be affected with less river flow, dead forests, etc. If not mistaken, I believe the State has also raised fees on such things as DMV license renewal, in grasping for additional income. Nevertheless, those along the Front Range may bear the brunt of this in increased congestion, pollution, traffic, costs, etc. They will at last, and are, running up against the limits of water supply, and one might expect various types of rationing. Not to mention schemes for uranium mining north of Denver that could very well radiate that huge underlying aquifer.

As far as I'm concerned, Colorado doesn't need any more transplants, but actually a population about a fifth her present size. That doesn't appear likely any time soon. But if those presently here, and those with this their new home, indeed made it their home and cared for this land and all upon her as much, we'd all be better off.

I agree with you... I miss CO that's why I am going back and from all the posts I have read apparently a lot of transplants are moving to CO. But I am a native and I wish CO wouldn't change in the way where what makes Colorado, Colorado is taken away. Wow everything I have read so far is really depressing wow. I guess when I go to CO I will see 4 myself what everybody is talking about. thanx.
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Old 12-06-2009, 07:33 PM
 
4 posts, read 8,207 times
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Colorado's big change was from 90 to 2005 or so. I know cause I built hundreds of houses between Parker, Castle Rock and Denver from 1990-1995. When I got there it was 11 miles of bare land. There were about 10 stores in Parker. There was no express way around the place. We built on all the clay and what ever was there . And the houses fell apart. Not my fault I just subcontracted the framing.
Then I moved up to Leadville and watched and built while Hollywood moved in and took prices till you couldn't afford anything. Now nobody can live in the mountains like a civilized human being.
Now i've been in TN for for the last 8 years. bought 6 acres on a plateau on a dead end road. We have one person move in a mile down the road in 8 years.
I would love to come back to CO but to make a living you have to destroy the place. My kids and Ex still live in Aurora.
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Old 12-07-2009, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Greeley, Colorado
631 posts, read 1,358,480 times
Reputation: 161
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bindenver View Post
I suggest you take a visit and see for yourself.

Some things have changed. Some things have changed for the better. Some things have not changed for the better.

We have no idea where you lived and what specifically you are referring to.

I'd also suggest you stop being inflammatory. Just because someone says something, doesn't mean it's true.
couldn't have been said better.
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Old 12-07-2009, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,903,079 times
Reputation: 2435
I can't think of changes in the past five years, other than maybe a few more people moved in, maybe a few more buildings in Denver.
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Old 12-08-2009, 02:28 PM
 
34 posts, read 94,656 times
Reputation: 37
hmmm, changes in the last five years would be the same changes you see in every city in America. Colorado was a hot spot for many transplants which drove up the housing market. Oddly though, our minimum wage just recently went up (2007) so we had a lot of over inflated houses being supported by people who unfortunately bought too much house for their income. So we have alot more suburbs of track houses with quite of few foreclosures but is that so different than the other 49 states?
As far as the natural beauty of Colorado, don't worry. The Department of Wildlife has done a great job at keeping the beauty of Colorado accessible but well maintained. Colorado will welcome you home with open arms if you choose to come back!
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Old 12-09-2009, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
302 posts, read 760,072 times
Reputation: 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by jettsettr View Post
As far as the natural beauty of Colorado, don't worry. The Department of Wildlife has done a great job at keeping the beauty of Colorado accessible but well maintained. Colorado will welcome you home with open arms if you choose to come back!
I hope that's the case. I'd hate to see the over-regulation and congestion that befell California happen to Colorado.
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Old 12-13-2009, 04:28 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,374 posts, read 40,158,807 times
Reputation: 13176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Screw Sacramento View Post
I hope that's the case. I'd hate to see the over-regulation and congestion that befell California happen to Colorado.
IMHO that already happened, long before the last 5 years. Sorry guys, I have to echo Jazzlover here.

My favorite example, and I have used it here before, is Strawberry Hot Springs in Steamboat, once an off-the-beaten-path secret.
We once had the place all to ourselves in 1979.
I remember the horsetail ferns that grew right by the water.
It is now a spa with rules and regulations, shuttle services, and website.

This is not to say that no beauty remains in Colorado-of course it does.
2bindenver spoke truly.
The town where I partied during college is now notable as one of the best choices for relocating retirees. Is it still a nice town? Indeed it is.

As Jettsettr says, similar changes have occurred all over the USA.

The trendsters pass along their word of mouth and migrate to each new land of milk and honey. What once was enough, no longer is.

Growth happens. The tricky part is keeping it sustainable.
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Old 12-14-2009, 06:55 AM
 
6 posts, read 10,523 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWillowPlate View Post
IMHO that already happened, long before the last 5 years. Sorry guys, I have to echo Jazzlover here.

My favorite example, and I have used it here before, is Strawberry Hot Springs in Steamboat, once an off-the-beaten-path secret.
We once had the place all to ourselves in 1979.
I remember the horsetail ferns that grew right by the water.
It is now a spa with rules and regulations, shuttle services, and website.

This is not to say that no beauty remains in Colorado-of course it does.
2bindenver spoke truly.
The town where I partied during college is now notable as one of the best choices for relocating retirees. Is it still a nice town? Indeed it is.

As Jettsettr says, similar changes have occurred all over the USA.

The trendsters pass along their word of mouth and migrate to each new land of milk and honey. What once was enough, no longer is.

Growth happens. The tricky part is keeping it sustainable.



Yeah you're right, growth happens. I'm just really anxious to move back to Colorado. I guess my family/friends are exaggerating about it changing a lot.
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Old 12-14-2009, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,351,797 times
Reputation: 4131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Screw Sacramento View Post
I hope that's the case. I'd hate to see the over-regulation and congestion that befell California happen to Colorado.
Unlikely. California currently has a population of over 35 million people. The best projections I have seen for Colorado call for only 10 million people in the next 50 to 100 years. Our state can more then handle that as Pueblo alone currently has enough water and resources for a city of about 750,000 to 1 million people.
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