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Old 01-06-2010, 03:47 PM
 
8 posts, read 20,442 times
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Going to make the move this next Ski Season to a resort in Colorado? Wanted to know peoples opinions on which resort to move to and why? I am 32, like to have a good time, but my hard partying days are over. I will be moving with my girlfriend and don't mind sharing housing to keep costs low. I am really open to any area big or small, isolated or close to big populations. I just want to get out of the my cubicle and the rat race that I feel like my life has become....please any and all opinions will be considered...let me know what you think.
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,303,036 times
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Whichever one will give you a job?
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:01 PM
 
8 posts, read 20,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Whichever one will give you a job?
I have made several calls, and it looks like I am going to have to start at the bottom and work my way up...which isn't a problem. They all pay roughly the same amount for entry level jobs, so that isn't my biggest concern
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Woodland Park, CO
3,133 posts, read 9,127,746 times
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Hope you got a suitcase full of money!

I personally like Silverthorne since it's an actual city. Even has car dealers, outlet mall and a Target, so you know it's legit. Only 5 minutes to Keystone and 10 minutes to Breckenridge. Right off I70 for a nice drive to Denver for big city stuff.

My wife and I want to move there someday but I don't think that day will come unless we win the lottery (which we don't play)!

You can get a ~1000 sq ft condo for $250k and actual house will start at $400k.

rockies.craigslist.org to get a feel how much rent will go for. Looks like you can get a 1bed/1bath for under $1000/month. Should be doable for a couple like yourself.

Just found this: http://rockies.craigslist.org/apa/1539871995.html (broken link)
10miles to Keystone and 17miles to Breck. For $800 you can't beat it, IMO.

Last edited by PokerMunkee; 01-06-2010 at 05:15 PM..
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Old 01-06-2010, 06:16 PM
 
8 posts, read 20,442 times
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Thanks for the input pokermunkee, I'll look into those postings
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Old 01-06-2010, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Avondale, AZ
1,207 posts, read 4,145,626 times
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I'd recommend Steamboat Springs. It's a little more out of the way, and a bit less hustle and bustle than the I-70 resorts. Can't give you much info about housing other than it isn't cheap. Amazing place, especially in the summer.
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Old 01-06-2010, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,303,036 times
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I know a lot of resorts are bringing in Eastern Europeans in the summer as lifeguards, waiters, and other of the grunt jobs. Is that true also for the ski resorts in the winter?
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Old 01-07-2010, 03:55 AM
 
10,878 posts, read 41,277,928 times
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OP ... you say you want "out of the rat race" ...

Given the low entry wages and seasonal nature of many of the jobs in the ski resort areas, you might want to consider that you're only changing a headache for an upset stomach, even if the scenery is a little more spectacular.

Everybody I know who lives in ski resort areas pays a personal price for the pleasure of being there and generally works harder/more hours than if they were back where they'd come from. There aren't too many jobs there that pay so well that it's a life of leisure and recreation in the mountains ... you get to work hard to be able to play hard. Working two and three jobs in the winter months to make ends meet isn't uncommon ... and the business owners I know work the equivalent of that many hours per week, too, especially during the winter months. Working for wages will have you seeking job hours during the summer months, too ... and competing against a lot of folk who will work for less for the time that they're willing to be there.

Perhaps you have professional skills which can lead to a better paying salaried job or one with commission potential to boost your income?

I've known too many people who were well known locals in the ski industry, instructors, ski patrol, support workers, mid-level managers ... who could barely afford to drive old cars, and could only afford nice ski gear/clothing/accessories due to "in the trade" discounts and sales accomodations by shops for the locals. At the end of 30-40 year careers, they had nothing to show for all their years of hard work, little in the way of household possessions, little assets, and never could afford to buy (let alone pay off) their own home. For a lot of workers, unless you come to the ski resort areas with an independent or outside source of income, making ends meet is a constant struggle of trading time for dollars and seeking every possible opportunity to bring in more income to meet the expenses of being in the area while also seeking every possible means to economize on expenses (like shared living quarters or very small apartments, etc).

Your best option for a place to move to is going to be the one that has jobs for you and your SO and affordable housing. Even if you're at a point in your life where you're willing to make a career move, you'll not find that there's a lot of opportunities for the new face in town ... others have been there for years, "paying their dues" to get to those opportunities, and have been networking for a long time; they have substantial advantages over you to get hired and retained when/if those better paying jobs become available. The allure of working and living in the mountains has a lot of people already in the worker pipeline ....

Last edited by sunsprit; 01-07-2010 at 04:21 AM..
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Old 01-07-2010, 10:56 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,051,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
OP ... you say you want "out of the rat race" ...

Given the low entry wages and seasonal nature of many of the jobs in the ski resort areas, you might want to consider that you're only changing a headache for an upset stomach, even if the scenery is a little more spectacular.

Everybody I know who lives in ski resort areas pays a personal price for the pleasure of being there and generally works harder/more hours than if they were back where they'd come from. There aren't too many jobs there that pay so well that it's a life of leisure and recreation in the mountains ... you get to work hard to be able to play hard. Working two and three jobs in the winter months to make ends meet isn't uncommon ... and the business owners I know work the equivalent of that many hours per week, too, especially during the winter months. Working for wages will have you seeking job hours during the summer months, too ... and competing against a lot of folk who will work for less for the time that they're willing to be there.

Perhaps you have professional skills which can lead to a better paying salaried job or one with commission potential to boost your income?

I've known too many people who were well known locals in the ski industry, instructors, ski patrol, support workers, mid-level managers ... who could barely afford to drive old cars, and could only afford nice ski gear/clothing/accessories due to "in the trade" discounts and sales accomodations by shops for the locals. At the end of 30-40 year careers, they had nothing to show for all their years of hard work, little in the way of household possessions, little assets, and never could afford to buy (let alone pay off) their own home. For a lot of workers, unless you come to the ski resort areas with an independent or outside source of income, making ends meet is a constant struggle of trading time for dollars and seeking every possible opportunity to bring in more income to meet the expenses of being in the area while also seeking every possible means to economize on expenses (like shared living quarters or very small apartments, etc).

Your best option for a place to move to is going to be the one that has jobs for you and your SO and affordable housing. Even if you're at a point in your life where you're willing to make a career move, you'll not find that there's a lot of opportunities for the new face in town ... others have been there for years, "paying their dues" to get to those opportunities, and have been networking for a long time; they have substantial advantages over you to get hired and retained when/if those better paying jobs become available. The allure of working and living in the mountains has a lot of people already in the worker pipeline ....
Well you said it better than I could have.

making ends meet is a constant struggle of trading time for dollars and seeking every possible opportunity to bring in more income to meet the expenses of being in the area while also seeking every possible means to economize on expenses (like shared living quarters or very small apartments, etc)

I keep finding in life there are trade offs for everything.

When I moved out to Vail in 1999, I thought I would be skiing all the time. When I finally left Colorado in 2007 you know how many times I skied Aspen, Summit County, Vail or Steamboat?

Zero. 0. Yep zero times. Not one time did I ever go skiing. Ski season was the busy time and that's when you earned the big bucks so I was working 80-100 hours a week. When I did have the day off, I was spent and exhausted. Certainly didn't want to go skiing. Did I miss out? I think so and probably should have balanced it better. But still I had to make a living and there was no work for 4-5 months of the year.

I guess what I enjoyed was all the employees from all over the world and the fact that I had a few months off every year to do what I wanted.

We did have seasonal employees that worked for us that were "ski bums". They skied all the time, but they didn't have any money at the end of season either.

I had the opportunity to move beyond the supervisory position I was in but could see the writing on the wall in regards to the economy and the fact that I could never have a normal life with a regular house there. So I left. Right now I make the same I did living in ski towns in Colorado, but work 1/4 the hours and have a normal life. I can fly out to Colorado anytime I want and stay with friends if I really want to go there.

My sister and brother in law they have done well. They both started on the bottom and worked their way up. However the economy has impacted them and they have gone from a flash lifestyle to a 2/3rds cut in their household income and it is likely they will have to leave as I did.

The company I worked for we had a high turnover of seasonal employees. It depended, some years better than others, but the retention rate could be as low as 10% for the following year. And basically what it came down to was people came for a winter, skied, partied, had fun for 4-5 months and then it was time to go back to the real world to earn a living. It wasn't something sustainable from year to year for most people.

All of my friends that are still in Vail that I started with in 1999, they are all well into their 30's or older even and all are still living as roommates in apartments with no discernible change in their living standards in 10 years. Most are in supervisor or above positions too.
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Old 01-07-2010, 11:05 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,051,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I know a lot of resorts are bringing in Eastern Europeans in the summer as lifeguards, waiters, and other of the grunt jobs. Is that true also for the ski resorts in the winter?
I started noticing that in Vail back around 2003 or so, seeing a lot of eastern euros working low end jobs.

Aussies and Kiwis were popular in the winter due to the fact it was summer in the southern hemisphere and the winter rhymed with their summer university break. That worked well as they speak english, are educated and come from well liked countries.

However the economy is so bad, the US government has closed a lot of loopholes that were being abused to get temporary visas for university students. Some employers had also secured H-2B visas which allowed for temporary workers up to 10 months to come over. The US government wound those back as well.

Back five years ago my old employer probably brought in 180 people from Australia and NZ, plus a few from the UK, South Africa and Ireland. We had a smaller permanent year round staff of Americans and we did try to hire as many American seasonal staff as we could. This year that was cut way down to 60 internationals and new hires were mostly Americans and it apparently wasn't hard this year to get Americans due to so many people needing jobs.
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