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Old 01-15-2010, 12:51 PM
 
2,182 posts, read 3,408,223 times
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Wink A real life

Durango, CO and Boulder, CO are distinctly different animals. If having grown a fair amount of late, Durango remains a small regional town with a limited market. While both are expensive, one would have a far better chance establishing a true career in Boulder. It is not only a larger town, but has reasonable proximity to the Denver, CO metro area.

A trustafarian, as I understand it, is primarily someone with a trust fund, without the need to work. If the term seemingly used in a derogatory manner, my suspicion a good many would jump at the chance to be one, if only.

If you are determined to live in the Colorado mountains, then you probably should. Living in Denver doesn't qualify. Durango for all its charms is only on the edge of the San Juan mountains. There is simply no comparison to living in the mountains. Visiting them occasionally because you live on the Colorado front range and ostensibly living the dream is not the same. But that cuts both ways. Most people live along the front range because life is easier there, with less expensive housing, more job opportunities, and a milder climate. There is nothing like being in the mountains, but aside from the snow, etc., also the question of how one affords it.

When it comes to that, you'll wish you were a trustafarian. Colorado's economy might be better than Detroit, MI, but it has never been all that easy in the mountains. It is just a small market, often dependent on seasonal tourism. The majority of positions, even in a place as prosperous as Summit County, will be the likes of bartender, ski patrol, etc. If determined, one can live on that, although something of a questionable career. There are of course the professions, doctors, lawyers, in a certain small amount. But know also that others, such as firemen and police, often live removed, like in Leadville, CO maybe, due housing costs and their relatively low pay in relation to that.

So, as far as going for it, I highly recommend it. Particularly if you are young. Just know that at a moment you might tire of the enterprise and elope back to the real world, just that much behind your peers who were sensible and remained on the corporate ladder. But from the confines of an office cubicle they'll never have seen what you have, even if briefly visiting such places on vacation. It could be they'll be doing so, at the exclusive hotel or condo, with you in attendance serving them in some fashion, knowing all the while you could never afford that. But at the end of the day, they'll be retreating back to their suburban life in or near some city, and you'll still be in the mountains. By some measures, that is the real life.
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Old 01-15-2010, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
3,814 posts, read 5,052,090 times
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Trust fund babies. Rich people who inherited their wealth, don't work for a living, and buy themselves a place in the mountain town so they can live the good life. Sometimes their parents send them to live in such places as part of the terms of their trust fund, in order to get them out of the way and don't have to deal with them. Or the terms of their fund means they get $20,000/month so they choose a nice place to that's cheaper than the East or West coast. The reason people on these forums talk about them in negative terms is because trust fund babies are outsiders to the community, they sometimes behave obnoxiously, they drive around in expensive vehicles and so the locals who aren't rich, become offended by this.

The only jobs you can expect to find in mountain towns are: working in hotels, restaurants, house cleaning, landscaping, and these sorts of things where you are providing services to the rich.

If you are an expert in river rafting, skiing, or fly fishing then you can get a job as a guide.

That's it. There's no other jobs.

If you want to move to a mountain town and you have a university education in the physical sciences, then move to Los Alamos, NM.
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Old 01-15-2010, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,783,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
Or the terms of their fund means they get $20,000/month so they choose a nice place to that's cheaper than the East or West coast. The reason people on these forums talk about them in negative terms is because trust fund babies are outsiders to the community, they sometimes behave obnoxiously, they drive around in expensive vehicles and so the locals who aren't rich, become offended by this.
Yeah but if they're generous they make for great pals.
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:36 PM
 
9,703 posts, read 12,018,823 times
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I think jobs in the mountains consist of these types of jobs:

1. government-there are always your basic government jobs
2. oil, gas, mineral extraction-this comes and goes
3. ranching-usually something passed down through generations
4. skiing/tourism- really flat right now
5. low wage labor- this is your best shot
6. services- doctors, plumbers, etc.
7. 2nd home or dream real estate/construction- completely dead for now and probably will be for a generation due to the way over the top excessive construction

If you have a career in one of those fields then you might have a chance. But you have to compete with a bunch of other people with the same dream, hence high real estate costs and low wages.

It's a well covered topic here on City Data it seems but there is no magic lining or silver bullet. If you want to live up in the mountains you pay a premium for it. Just the way it is. And no I don't consider places like Boulder or Grand Junction in the mountains. Near them yes, but in them no.

Of the trust fund types, having a lot of experience working for the mega rich, most are in vapid Aspen. Vail and BC at least is more conservative and of all the rich families I worked for there, the kids were expected to get off their ass and get educated and then get to work. Aspen on the other hand is liberal and hollywood, so there are trust fund babies living there, snorting coke and hitting the slopes. However,

Mostly I think you will find in the wealthy Colorado ski towns, most people that have money are older folks. You don't see many young rich running around. A few or some, sure, but I can tell you the real money is people over 55+.
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Old 01-16-2010, 01:19 AM
 
857 posts, read 646,033 times
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Default Classified Advetising

Quote:
Originally Posted by proveick View Post
That unemployment statistic is not a good representation. The reason it's so low is most of the young people have LEFT, hence lower number. There are NO jobs for young folks in the high country. I have friends that have always found a way to get by for the last 10 years. Even being well connected they are getting blown out or should I say, economically eliminated. RP
40 jobs in the Durango Herald Classifieds, versus a handful in the paper in places like Albuquerque and Flagstaff? That means SOMETHING, I hope!

When you have 4.6% Durango unemployment, vs. 15% in San Bernadino, CA, then you don't have 500 people applying for every single job in the paper.

I think entrepreneurs in small towns will get us through the recession w/ small businesses and farming. I do not have the patience to stand in a line of 500 people at a new Staples or Home Depot in San Bernadino or L.A. County.

Why does life have to be so complicated in the declining Urban areas, when entrepreneurship and telecommuting can take place in the high country?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
I think jobs in the mountains consist of these types of jobs:

1. government-there are always your basic government jobs
2. oil, gas, mineral extraction-this comes and goes
3. ranching-usually something passed down through generations
4. skiing/tourism- really flat right now
5. low wage labor- this is your best shot
6. services- doctors, plumbers, etc.
7. 2nd home or dream real estate/construction- completely dead for now and probably will be for a generation due to the way over the top excessive construction

If you have a career in one of those fields then you might have a chance. But you have to compete with a bunch of other people with the same dream, hence high real estate costs and low wages. [/truncated/]
Thanks - the competition in this case is not a life or death situation, as it would be for 500 people standing in line in front of a new Home Depot in San Bernadino or L.A. Counties (no pun intended).

I don't know of any big cities that are "hiring" in droves right now, and certainly the interview process for Corporations would be discursive among so many applicants.

It seems that ultimately, big city populations may need to decentralize TOWARDS the Rocky mountains with more entrepreneurs, writers, artists, permaculturalists, small farmers, and telecommuters, but that's a question to pose for the Santa Fe, NM; Sedona, AZ; or Crestone, CO forums!

Colorado looks great for a lot of us from neighborhing states. For example, Arizona is in bad shape; closing two thirds of its state parks during a Midnight Meeting, and closing the World Renowned High Altitude Sports Training Center at Northern Arizona University (7,000').

Last edited by CCCVDUR; 01-16-2010 at 02:27 AM..
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Old 01-16-2010, 01:41 AM
 
857 posts, read 646,033 times
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Default Volunteering And Writing In Colorado Mountains

Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
The reason people on these forums talk about them in negative terms is because trust fund babies are outsiders to the community, they sometimes behave obnoxiously, they drive around in expensive vehicles and so the locals who aren't rich, become offended by this.
No - no - no - they are a negative influence especially w/ their meth labs. I want to find a community that I can become a part of, joining the City or Town boards or Forest Service providing service in outdoor education, trail building, forest fire prevention, etc. In fact, those activities might come BEFORE finding job, or, the volunteering could lead DIRECTLY to a job.

What's the best place for this? Durango? Santa Fe? Summit County?

I would surmise that in Boulder, the place is closed to volunteering by a tightly knit cliche of business interests running the city, but that's just a guess on what little I know. What do you think?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
If you want to move to a mountain town and you have a university education in the physical sciences, then move to Los Alamos, NM.
Actually, I do, however I'm a Writer and somewhat of a philosopher.

What place would you suggest, in this case? Durango? Santa Fe? Crestone?
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Old 01-16-2010, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,783,647 times
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Fort Logan.
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Old 01-16-2010, 10:36 AM
 
9,703 posts, read 12,018,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
Thanks - the competition in this case is not a life or death situation, as it would be for 500 people standing in line in front of a new Home Depot in San Bernadino or L.A. Counties (no pun intended).

I don't know of any big cities that are "hiring" in droves right now, and certainly the interview process for Corporations would be discursive among so many applicants.

It seems that ultimately, big city populations may need to decentralize TOWARDS the Rocky mountains with more entrepreneurs, writers, artists, permaculturalists, small farmers, and telecommuters, but that's a question to pose for the Santa Fe, NM; Sedona, AZ; or Crestone, CO forums!

Colorado looks great for a lot of us from neighborhing states. For example, Arizona is in bad shape; closing two thirds of its state parks during a Midnight Meeting, and closing the World Renowned High Altitude Sports Training Center at Northern Arizona University (7,000').
Well bud, you have to remember that these mountain towns only have populations in the thousands or low five figures not a metro area of 20 million so no there isn't going to be 500 people lining up out front of a Home Depot in the mountains. However when Home Depot opened in Avon, CO back around 2005, a lot of jobs were coveted due to the perceived 9-5 stability.

I think people confuse the mountain towns with some big metropolis. Tourists at times can make them look bigger than they are. Vail for instance only has 3000 permanent residents, but up to 20000 tourists can be there at a time. Jobs revolve around real estate, skiing and related tourists and second home services. The real estate boom is over and skiing I believe is on a decline. A lot of income is seasonal. Mostly I didn't work for 4 months of a year.

What good jobs are available, you have to be in the know and a part of the fabric of the town. Realistically only locals that have been there a while get those jobs, unless it is a highly specialized field were someone can't be sourced locally. I worked with plenty of MBA's and Ph.D's that were working the same "grunt" job I was doing, so there are plenty of qualified people up in the hills.

In Vail, Aspen and Summit County I got to know plenty of telecommuters, artists, and other types, that lived up there. In a lot of cases it was very limiting for them(depending on what they were doing) or unsustainable. A lot of people fantasize about the mountains and then they fail to realize how isolating it can be(even in towns) and that winter can be in effect for nine months of the year. Some fantasies like permaculture are just that. The growing season sometimes is only a few weeks long.

And the last thing we need in the mountains is more big city liberals trying to impose a big liberal city viewpoint and structure on a tiny mountain town. We've already had that to ill effect.

With all due respect, I wouldn't take it the wrong way but I don't think you have any clue about the Colorado mountains or what life is really like up there. You are imparting a So Cal urban viewpoint on what is a high elevation, harsh environment.
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:19 PM
 
857 posts, read 646,033 times
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Default Looking For Area With Private Property Rights

[quote=wanneroo;12472562] However when Home Depot opened in Avon, CO back around 2005, a lot of jobs were coveted due to the perceived 9-5 stability. and . Vail for instance only has 3000 permanent residents, but up to 20000 tourists can be there at a time.

My replies in BOLD - Two VERY good points . . . you continue:


Jobs revolve around real estate, skiing and related tourists and second home services. The real estate boom is over and skiing I believe is on a decline. A lot of income is seasonal. Mostly I didn't work for 4 months of a year.

Tourism is great for me as a huge outdoors guy into bicycling and hiking . . . and also horticulture / forestry / etc. In essence, the types of jobs you don't find in Orange County.

What good jobs are available, you have to be in the know and a part of the fabric of the town. Realistically only locals that have been there a while get those jobs, unless it is a highly specialized field were someone can't be sourced locally.

That's the info I'm looking for. Well, I'm into horticulture and have a biological science degree.


A lot of people fantasize about the mountains and then they fail to realize how isolating it can be(even in towns)

The SMALLEST in Colorado that I would go is Durango!


Some fantasies like permaculture are just that. The growing season sometimes is only a few weeks long.

Very true, however, it is increasingly difficult and expensive to gain permits for small farm infrastructure in "smart growth" areas such as California and Oregon.


And the last thing we need in the mountains is more big city liberals trying to impose a big liberal city viewpoint and structure on a tiny mountain town. We've already had that to ill effect.

I am no big city liberal. In fact, living in the mountain town of Flagstaff, it seemed that I was the ONLY (Libertarian) in town who supported private property rights and middle class families.


With all due respect, I wouldn't take it the wrong way but I don't think you have any clue about the Colorado mountains or what life is really like up there. You are imparting a So Cal urban viewpoint on what is a high elevation, harsh environment.

Not quite . . . I've lived in Flagstaff, Santa Fe, and Albuquerque, three areas with extensive government controls in land use. I'm looking for an area with more individual liberties and private property rights. And you've probably heard of the Liberal Lake Tahoe Regional Planning Authority (TRPA), and Boulder and Santa Cruz's "Smart Growth." Yes, smart growth is a political concept, however it is ALSO a LIFESTYLE issue, since some people prefer living on large tracts of land. Colorado (except Boulder, Denver) does not have a statewide growth management, smart growth act . . .

Where in Colorado is there the least land use regulation? Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Fort Logan.
Do U mean Ft. Logan, Montana? I can't find a Ft. Logan, CO. Thanks.
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Old 01-17-2010, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,783,647 times
Reputation: 6455
[quote=CCCVDUR;12480898]
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Do U mean Ft. Logan, Montana? I can't find a Ft. Logan, CO. Thanks.
Google it. Denverites should understand the reference.
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