U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2010, 01:06 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,014 times
Reputation: 186

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob from down south View Post
LMAO at this one. No truth has been better written.

I remember a Chris Titus routine from a few years ago...he said (paraphrasing) that when a Mom sees a kid headed for the outlet with a hairpin, she stops him, takes the hairpin away, and that process has to be repeated who knows how many times before junior outgrows the urge.

But Dad doesn't take the hairpin away...instead he motions to his wife..."psssssst...HEY, WATCH THIS..." zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzAP!! "Hey little man, that HURT, din't it? Not gonna do THAT again, are ya??!!"

Soooo...in that light...yeah, go ahead and move here. (pssssst...HEY, WATCH THIS!!)
I don't know who you folks are, however, I know of several people who have moved to Colorado mountain communities from larger urban areas and are very happy - spanning the state from Ft. Collins to Durango.

Frankly, your rhetorical arguments are entirely inconsistent with everyone that I talked to when visiting Colorado last summer.

I talked with dozens of residents about housing, jobs, transportation, the weather, etc. Criticize it if you wish, but you can bet that that most who attempt to do this in the high country will not regret their decision.

I don't even know if I'm moving to the Colorado high country or not, however, I find these individuals who speak in generalities w/o citing specific examples grounded in economics to be particularly unhelpful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2010, 01:14 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,069,687 times
Reputation: 7546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob from down south View Post
LMAO at this one. No truth has been better written.

I remember a Chris Titus routine from a few years ago...he said (paraphrasing) that when a Mom sees a kid headed for the outlet with a hairpin, she stops him, takes the hairpin away, and that process has to be repeated who knows how many times before junior outgrows the urge.

But Dad doesn't take the hairpin away...instead he motions to his wife..."psssssst...HEY, WATCH THIS..." zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzAP!! "Hey little man, that HURT, din't it? Not gonna do THAT again, are ya??!!"

Soooo...in that light...yeah, go ahead and move here. (pssssst...HEY, WATCH THIS!!)
As someone who I would say has done a fairly good job of being a self realized person and is "living my dream", that dreams, especially big ones, usually take twice as much time and twice as much work as expected.

I did live the Colorado rockies dream, but it cost me a lot in different ways. I gained life experience many other people don't have though, so it evens out.

So I understand what the OP is desiring and I respect his/her goals and ambitions.

However what set me back was you have someone who has spent a week in Colorado and has a few stats, insinuate that people here who have actually been there and done it, they have no freaking clue what they are talking about. In the 18 months on this forum I have seen few that have the level of experience I do in seasonal and tourist based work in Colorado.

I find it foolhardy that someone comes here looking for advice and help and then discounts experienced people and plans on hanging around until someone tells them what they want to hear.

In my current job I see the difference between reality and fantasy ALL the time. People have seen "Days of Thunder" or played racing video games and think car racing is easy as loafing on the coach. Their perceptions and fantasy of what race car driving is one thing. The reality of it is different. Once they experience the heat, noise, vibration, harshness and then going at real speed on track, the reality sets in. They get scared, nervous, barf and even poop or **** their pants. There are even some I have heard about that have heart attacks first time in a car and bang right in the wall and dead.

The bigger the talker they are, the worse they are after that experience. Can't tell you how many people have said it was different than what they ever thought it to be. How the fantasy they had was so different from the reality.

So it's the same with Colorado mountain living. There is the fantasy that people have about it and then there is the reality about it. Two wholly separate things.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 01:23 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,069,687 times
Reputation: 7546
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
I don't know who you folks are, however, I know of several people who have moved to Colorado mountain communities from larger urban areas and are very happy - spanning the state from Ft. Collins to Durango.

Frankly, your rhetorical arguments are entirely inconsistent with everyone that I talked to when visiting Colorado last summer.

I talked with dozens of residents about housing, jobs, transportation, the weather, etc. Criticize it if you wish, but you can bet that that most who attempt to do this in the high country will not regret their decision.

I don't even know if I'm moving to the Colorado high country or not, however, I find these individuals who speak in generalities w/o citing specific examples grounded in economics to be particularly unhelpful.
Ft. Collins aint a mountain town. Boulder isn't either. They are bog standard American suburbia on flat land near the mountains and Boulder has a liberal twist.

Everyone has a different perspective I am sure and yes there are a lot of positives to living in the Rockies if you are a single person without a bunch of responsibilities. I encourage people all the time to move there.

But it is not like living in a regular American town.

Again for the 3rd time you still haven't accepted that unemployment rates have nothing to do with jobs available, nor wages, nor cost of living.

And you know I don't really need economic stats cause I have family all over the western slope and I've lived there and done it. Earn your spurs first before you blowhard that people that have lived up there don't know nothing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 01:26 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,014 times
Reputation: 186
Default Disputing Ecnomic Statistics On Colorado

[quote=wanneroo;12508435]

However what set me back was you have someone who has spent a week in Colorado and has a few stats, insinuate that people here who have actually been there and done it, they have no freaking clue what they are talking about.....

CCCVDUR writes in BLUE - When those STATISTICS indicate a state average of 6% unemployment, in Mountain Towns from Ft. Collins to Durango, I think that's a much better choice than Southern California w/ 14% unemployment.

I find it foolhardy that someone comes here looking for advice and help and then discounts experienced people and plans on hanging around until someone tells them what they want to hear.

No - no - no. Emotional responses to my comments about economics are not valuable in making wise economic decisions.


Furthermore, the subject line doesn't ask whether or not it is "possible" or not (a vague, subjective form of reasoning). It says, "Mountain Towns for 20- and 30- Somethings."

And, you're implying that Money magazine, etc. are WRONG when they have stated that Ft. Collins, Boulder, etc. are the best towns for young singles, careers, young familes, and other categories.

The Brookings Institution is wrong when it states that Denver is in the top 20 Metro areas nationwide.

You, at this point, are no longer disputing with my credibility.

You're disputing the economic statistics that I've quoted in earlier posts (and other Colorado thread), indicating that Colorado would be a wise choice over, in my case, Foreclosureworld down here in Arizona/California.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 01:33 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,014 times
Reputation: 186
Default Colorado Cost Of Living And Unemployment

Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post
Ft. Collins aint a mountain town. Boulder isn't either. They are bog standard American suburbia on flat land near the mountains and Boulder has a liberal twist.

Again for the 3rd time you still haven't accepted that unemployment rates have nothing to do with jobs available, nor wages, nor cost of living.

And you know I don't really need economic stats cause I have family all over the western slope and I've lived there and done it. Earn your spurs first before you blowhard that people that have lived up there don't know nothing.

All right, I deal with facts, not generalizations. Maybe you deal with instinct. Each to their own.

Ft. Collins and Boulder are in the foothills, and that's close enough to be in the same category as towns in Central Colorado and SW Colorado.

Unemployment rates are directly proportional to the CHANCE one will get a job. If 50% of a populations of 500 are unemployed, and there is one position, then 250 people will line up.

If 5% are unemployed, then 25 people will line up for an interview.


The cost of living in Durango and Ft. Collins is less than most medium sized markets in Arizona/California. Boulder is more expensive than most of the rest of Colorado

This idea of working 3 jobs just to pay the rent sharing a house with 4 others is preposterous. Where's the evidence? Average rents in Ft. Collins / Durango range from ~$600-$800 or so. A $12/hour job 40 hrs a week more than pays for that.

Last edited by CCCVDUR; 01-19-2010 at 02:33 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,489,859 times
Reputation: 9292
CCCVDUR wrote:
And, you're implying that Money magazine, etc. are WRONG when they have stated that Ft. Collins, Boulder, etc. are the best towns for young singles, careers, young familes, and other categories.
IMO, that would be an unequivocal YES!

Those best places to live lists are compiled by looking at statistics and not by people who have actually lived in the places they write about. The criteia on which the lists are based, may or may not match the criteia that is important to any specific individual. Those lists have validity in only the most general way. Personally, I take most of what I read on those lists with a grain of salt. Jazzlover and wanneroo are speaking from experience. To me anyway, experience like that speaks far louder than an article written by professional magazine writers who get paid to write articles that sell advertsiing space in the magazine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 09:27 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,170,257 times
Reputation: 9066
We might as well not waste any more time trying to give CCVDUR the benefit of what amounts to probably a cumulative century of experience among us of living and working in rural Colorado. He doesn't want to hear it. He is just waiting for someone--anyone, whether they know anything or not--to validate his opinions; opinions he got from reading journalistically adolescent magazines like Money, or using fragmented statistics to substantiate his own preconceptions, rather than letting those statistics reveal a true story.

He will be one that embarks on an "adventure" that will wind up with him getting his *** handed to him--then he will blame everybody else for his misfortunes. All avoidable, if he would actually listen to what people with a lot of hard-won experience have to say.

He is the living embodiment of this quote from Ben Franklin:

Quote:
"Experience keeps a dear school, yet Fools will learn in no other."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 11:08 AM
 
2,437 posts, read 7,124,706 times
Reputation: 1507
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
If you're a 20- or 30- something who moved to Colorado w/ success, any advice?
Yes.

I found a job in a place where there was ample work and remained there until that job became a career which allowed me to move to the place of my choosing.

Of course, everyone follows a different path, so it will be different for you, but the point is this: True 'Success' is something that happens over many years and is seldom the result of one big decision paying off in your favor.

I know that may sound a bit preachy, but you asked for advice, so mine to you is this: Be patient, work diligently at whatever you are doing right now, and when the time is right, don't be afraid to make your move.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,329,748 times
Reputation: 6816
Now that's first rate advice!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2010, 04:49 PM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,069,687 times
Reputation: 7546
[quote=CCCVDUR;12508482]
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post

However what set me back was you have someone who has spent a week in Colorado and has a few stats, insinuate that people here who have actually been there and done it, they have no freaking clue what they are talking about.....

CCCVDUR writes in BLUE - When those STATISTICS indicate a state average of 6% unemployment, in Mountain Towns from Ft. Collins to Durango, I think that's a much better choice than Southern California w/ 14% unemployment.

I find it foolhardy that someone comes here looking for advice and help and then discounts experienced people and plans on hanging around until someone tells them what they want to hear.

No - no - no. Emotional responses to my comments about economics are not valuable in making wise economic decisions.


Furthermore, the subject line doesn't ask whether or not it is "possible" or not (a vague, subjective form of reasoning). It says, "Mountain Towns for 20- and 30- Somethings."

And, you're implying that Money magazine, etc. are WRONG when they have stated that Ft. Collins, Boulder, etc. are the best towns for young singles, careers, young familes, and other categories.

The Brookings Institution is wrong when it states that Denver is in the top 20 Metro areas nationwide.

You, at this point, are no longer disputing with my credibility.

You're disputing the economic statistics that I've quoted in earlier posts (and other Colorado thread), indicating that Colorado would be a wise choice over, in my case, Foreclosureworld down here in Arizona/California.
Now you are directing the conversation to something totally different.

Boulder, Ft. Collins and Denver are NOT mountain towns. The economics and demographics there are more normal American suburbia. They are on high elevation prairie and yes the mountains are close, but they are not mountain towns.

Sure the Front Range as far as cities goes I think it does provide a good mix of jobs and amenities. If I had to live in a city I think you could find a lot worse than the Denver area.

I really don't care that much about economic stats or Money magazine, when I am from there, lived there and have family there.

What you should do is move there and see for yourself. I think I've given a pretty balanced view of what it is really like to exist in a seasonal mountain town. Discard that info if you choose and Good Luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top