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Old 01-21-2010, 03:36 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post

Now you are directing the conversation to something totally different...

Boulder, Ft. Collins and Denver are NOT mountain towns...
1. Ft. Collins and Boulder are close to the mountains, and offer many of the same amenities, and the low unemployment rates, as Colorado cities at higher elevations (i.e. Salida, Durango).

2. Many Colorado mountain towns are not exclusively seasonal. For example, Durango offers winter skiing, and actively promotes its summer mountain biking/hiking/river rafting -- with world famous bicyclists in town.

Last edited by CCCVDUR; 01-21-2010 at 03:54 AM..
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Old 01-21-2010, 03:45 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,292 times
Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by wanneroo View Post

I find it foolhardy that someone comes here looking for advice and help and then discounts experienced people and plans on hanging around until someone tells them what they want to hear.
Many young 20- and 30- somethings are not interested in "making it" on a "permanent" basis in Colorado.

In fact, long term planning is not necessarily on the agenda, when the alternative is 10% to 15% unemployment rates in Arizona, Nevada, and the West Coast.

Instead, we are interested in finding seasonal/temporary employment that may lead to a career in the high country.

I was a member of Americorps / Student Conservation Association many years ago. I was paid a stipend, lived in old, run down, mice infested housing w/ lead paint, nevertheless, it was a fantastic learning experience.

Your ideals are different that those of many younger singles / couples who are into nature and the outdoors, and this is contributing to a lack of communication in this thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by treedonkey View Post
Yes.

I found a job in a place where there was ample work and remained there until that job became a career which allowed me to move to the place of my choosing.

Of course, everyone follows a different path, so it will be different for you, but the point is this: True 'Success' is something that happens over many years and is seldom the result of one big decision paying off in your favor.

I know that may sound a bit preachy, but you asked for advice, so mine to you is this: Be patient, work diligently at whatever you are doing right now, and when the time is right, don't be afraid to make your move.
Of course your advice is valid; I met many transplants when traveling through Colorado last summer, who were between 18 and 40, who were employed and had a place to live.

There are several Durango and Mountain Town threads right now besides this one, and most City-Data members are in favor of relocation.


I don't know if I'm going to CO or not, however your advice about being patient is always good advice.

Last edited by CCCVDUR; 01-21-2010 at 03:53 AM..
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Old 01-21-2010, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Colorado
2,561 posts, read 4,883,937 times
Reputation: 2219
In all fairness when I lived in Aspen I lived off a trust account, though it wasn't the millionaire status of some.And in all fairness,I remember quite a few friends fairly financially supported within the mountain communities. Still I had friends who lived and relied entirely on self sufficient income in the mountain towns through hard work. I remember people telling me as a young 24 year old that I wouldn't find a girlfriend in Aspen because it was mountain town...nothing could have been further than the reality..I met what was one of the hottest girlfriends within a week there, as did several of my friends. The mountain towns are all about connections. Btw Fort Collins,Boulder are not MT owns though...just colege towns on the Front Range...Still one could argue that Boulder will be the next Aspen in terms of hip,COL,and allure. It doesn't get much better in Colorado living in Boulder under ideal circumstances.
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Old 01-21-2010, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,756 posts, read 16,492,187 times
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CCCVDUR wrote:
Your ideals are different that those of many younger singles / couples who are into nature and the outdoors, and this is contributing to a lack of communication in this thread.
No doubt about it. The ideals of most people change as the birthdays accummulate over the years. That's life! Personally, I see no lack of communication on this thread. In reality, things are being communicated that you don't want to hear, and that's OK as far as I'm concerned, but it's not a lack of communication. Instead of negating the feedback you're getting, or arguing with those who you disagree with, do some cherry picking or just absorb whatever makes sense to you. Forget about the rest of it. Do whatever your heart is telling you and you can't go wrong. Now that doesn't mean you won't encounter challanges and difficulties along the way, but as long as you are following your heart you'll always find a way to effectively deal with the curve balls that life throws at you when you're looking for a fasball down the middle. Life is alot like baseball. Ocassionally you do do get the fastball down the middle that you're looking for, but more often than not, you're gonna get a curve ball down low, just off the plate. If you're not prepared to hit those pitches too, you'll be striking out alot. What you've been getting on this thread is some good suggestions on how to hit the curve balls. BTW, those suggestions are the ripest cherries on the tree.
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Old 01-21-2010, 09:43 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,072,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
Many young 20- and 30- somethings are not interested in "making it" on a "permanent" basis in Colorado.

In fact, long term planning is not necessarily on the agenda, when the alternative is 10% to 15% unemployment rates in Arizona, Nevada, and the West Coast.

Instead, we are interested in finding seasonal/temporary employment that may lead to a career in the high country.

I was a member of Americorps / Student Conservation Association many years ago. I was paid a stipend, lived in old, run down, mice infested housing w/ lead paint, nevertheless, it was a fantastic learning experience.

Your ideals are different that those of many younger singles / couples who are into nature and the outdoors, and this is contributing to a lack of communication in this thread.
I have known and worked with hundreds of ski bums and such types. Including people that camped out, lived in parking lots and all the rest.

Also I am into nature and the outdoors and spend plenty of time outdoors.

I think your problem is that you cannot accept that others have opinions and experience different from your own. Basically you want people to validate your opinions based on a few figures and a week trip to Colorado, when there are people that actually have something called experience instead and have a differing opinion. It's like a soldier right out of basic training telling a soldier who has done 4 tours in Iraq and Afghanistan they know nothing of war.
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Old 01-21-2010, 10:23 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 19,072,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
1. Ft. Collins and Boulder are close to the mountains, and offer many of the same amenities, and the low unemployment rates, as Colorado cities at higher elevations (i.e. Salida, Durango).

2. Many Colorado mountain towns are not exclusively seasonal. For example, Durango offers winter skiing, and actively promotes its summer mountain biking/hiking/river rafting -- with world famous bicyclists in town.
But Ft. Collins and Boulder are not mountain towns and have a different economies and a way of life. They are in a different realm and discussion altogether. It's apples and oranges.

You say many Colorado towns are not exclusively seasonal then in the next sentence you say just that.

The reality is that winter and summer are.......seasons. You will find that ski season in terms of being busy is from the week before Christmas until the end of March. Ski business in April and from Thanksgiving until Christmas is slow. Summer business gets going mid June is at peak from 4th of July to Labor Day and then rapidly falls into nothing.

Therefore if you are in a tourist based business you have about six good months of the year. What that means is you have to work a lot of hours in that time to be able to survive the slow times rest of the year.

To give you some idea of how business would drop off, we would go from around 4000 customers a day on March 20 to 30 customers a day on April 20. Add that to a corresponding cut in seasonal employees as well.

That mean when I started out I didn't get a paycheck for two months in Spring. In the summer until I became a vested "full time" employee(which took a couple of years) I had to pick up the scraps others didn't want. Then I went without a paycheck for another 3 months in the fall. Even once I was "full time" I had unpaid furlough time and was still completely off several months of the year. Being "full time" gave me benefits and a guarantee I would get 4 days of work in the summer.

River guiding and rafting is great fun but again seasonal. Several friends are river guides or drivers for the raft companies and again you only have 2-3 months when it is busy. Pay isn't all that great even including tips. But of course it's great experience and fun, but how many river guides last more than a few seasons before they go find a "real job" in Denver?

Bike shops same thing, due to the high country weather you really only have a 2-3 month period when those shops are actually busy.

Durango by the way doesn't get much in the way of "destination" skiers, which is where the money is.

And yes you can live in your car, camp out on BLM land, live in a trashy apartment, but how long can you sustain that for? I've done that and I've known people that have done it and you can only do it for so long. Especially in high mountain country.

I think you'll find if you research what I written over 18 months here on City Data in the Colorado forum, I have been very encouraging for people to move to mountain towns and I encourage you do so as well. It is a great experience but there are certain realities that go with it as well.
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Old 01-21-2010, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,334,278 times
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Best jobs in town would be on the railroad.
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Old 01-21-2010, 10:53 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,174,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Best jobs in town would be on the railroad.
Agreed. But that can be very nepotistic--I know plenty of the people who work there and for other railroads in Colorado. It is mostly a "who you know" and "who you are related to" deal.
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Old 01-21-2010, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Old Town Longmont
377 posts, read 896,637 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
Bottom line - The Colorado economy looks fantastic on paper; Colorado mountain towns have the lowest unemployment in the West. However, on a practical level, can 20- and 30- somethings really come to Colorado Mountain Towns this spring such as Durango, and find a job?
Can some 20- and 30-somethings come to CO this spring and find a job?

Yes.

Can all of them? No.

But everyone is trying to answer your question citing their own experience with the Colorado job market and you don't like the answers. That's fine.

Just come on out and get a job. Tell us your success story.
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Old 01-21-2010, 11:58 AM
 
23 posts, read 63,312 times
Reputation: 13
Summit county
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