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Old 01-21-2010, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,888 posts, read 8,903,079 times
Reputation: 2435

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jchasse View Post
For what it's worth, my wife and I both telecommute so we can live virtually anywhere in North America. We've spent most of our lives in the metropolitan New York City area (which I think qualifies as a proper city per 80's guidelines?).
Yes of course. NYC is surely the epitome of it (I lived in Fort Greene, Brooklyn), but there's also other, smaller cities around the country that I consider artistic, diverse and cultural.

Also understand that my criteria are different than the average population's criteria, because I'm a musician, my mom and sister are professional artists (fine art/painting), and even my father who was not a professional artist was an amateur photographer and theater actor.

I grew up immersed in the culture, I didn't just observe it once a month as a spectator.
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Old 01-21-2010, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,255,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
I grew up immersed in the culture, I didn't just observe it once a month as a spectator.
Well that certainly does make you special.
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Old 01-21-2010, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
118 posts, read 268,052 times
Reputation: 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
Well that's the key, there's not much to be found locally is there.

if you say so...i'd say it's pretty darn respectable. but what do i know, i've neve been to the big city...oh, wait...
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Old 01-21-2010, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
118 posts, read 268,052 times
Reputation: 184
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
....
I grew up immersed in the culture, I didn't just observe it once a month as a spectator.
Yes, of course. My wife's formal education is in classical music. Several of our closest friends are jazz musicians and/or work in the arts. The company I work for has in interest in a gallery in northern California. I clearly have no frame of reference.

jeez, there's no limit to the uninformed drivel folks are willing to spew over the interwebz...

I really have no concerns about whether folks on a web forum think I'm nave, or that I’m somehow the scourge of Colorado. The only reason I’ve waded in this far is because I honestly believe some of the advice and predictions regularly expressed here as fact, are in fact bunk. But I’ll butt out now…

on edit: PS - my actual point here is that the OP was looking for advice (presumably good advice). And if his or her values are anything like mine, some of the advice and opinions offered (here and in other threads) are awful... or just plain wrong. Some of you guys seem to honestly believe there's one accurate perspective - yours. but i can assure you that's not the case.

Best,
Clueless in Durango

Last edited by jchasse; 01-21-2010 at 07:32 PM..
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Old 01-22-2010, 12:16 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,346,834 times
Reputation: 186
Default What Are The Reasons For Your durango pessimism

[quote=jazzlover;12552206]Yes, there are telecommuters. I work them every day. But, they still rely on other industries to be healthy in order to make a living. They also run the risk of outsourcing to places outside of the United States.

And, specifically, how does the outsourcing of a Durango telecommuter overseas affect the quality of life of that person?

Also, I would imagine, based on his timing, that the guy from NYC was an equity locust, too, that brought a bunch of money with him to Durango to buy at the area's inflated prices. That did help soften the blow for a lot of transplants--I think those days are about over . . .

Why are they over?

Given what I think is coming soon to our energy/transportation system in this country, I think that is a big fat assumption that most people are making that is not likely to stay true. I predict that within 5 years or so air travel out of rural Colorado will be unaffordable to all but the most wealthy patrons, if service is available at all.

It is a big fat assumption probably associated with a political point of view on the fringe. For what reasons do you make this prediction, and how specifically would it affect the OP's decision of whether or not to take a job offer in Durango?

Then all those yuppie and bourgeoisie travelers will be left to mix it up with we serfs on the decaying rural Colorado highways--if they or we can afford or get the fuel.

Why will they not be able to afford the gasoline, and when? Denver has the lowest gas prices in the nation according to the news yesterday (Jan 21, 2010). Why does Colorado have "decaying" highways?


Interesting times ahead.

Meaning what, specifically?

Last edited by CCCVDUR; 01-22-2010 at 01:36 AM..
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Durango, CO
118 posts, read 268,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Also, I would imagine, based on his timing, that the guy from NYC was an equity locust, too, that brought a bunch of money with him to Durango to buy at the area's inflated prices. That did help soften the blow for a lot of transplants--I think those days are about over . . .
While we're asking clarification questions, can you tell me how this works? I haven't taken a real estate class since grad school 20 years ago, so i may be misinformed...

why would buying at inflated prices be a good thing

just to let you know, prices were more depressed in the area we came from than they are here, so there was no softening of the blow. it hurt financially. but we wanted to be here.

i've no idea what an"equity locust" is, but i don't think i am one. no trust fund or stock option money, either. we just work fo' a living.

but there is a HUGE bright side...for the first time in my life, i wake up every day thanking my lucky stars for where we live. its pretty darn rewarding, actually.

thanks for your interest.

Last edited by jchasse; 01-22-2010 at 08:48 AM..
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 26,255,168 times
Reputation: 6815
I think "equity locusts" may have gone by the wayside due to the disappearance of much of the equity. Many of them were second home owners who really contributed little to local economies. jchasse is really more a part of the new wave of BYOIs who move to a community bringing their incomes from outside but spending in the local community. This is a real win-win since it doesn't take a job from any of the locals but injects additional bucks into the local economy along with bringing new ideas. Places like Durango should be doing more to promote itself to these folks in other parts of the country, perhaps working in partnership with large companies who are virtualizing their workforces.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:55 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
Reputation: 9065
My responses in black.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCCVDUR View Post
And, specifically, how does the outsourcing of a Durango telecommuter overseas affect the quality of life of that person?

Because he won't have a job, anymore. What's so damned complex about that for you?

JL: Also, I would imagine, based on his timing, that the guy from NYC was an equity locust, too, that brought a bunch of money with him to Durango to buy at the area's inflated prices. That did help soften the blow for a lot of transplants--I think those days are about over . . .

Why are they over?

Because the real estate bubble around the rest of the US (including in Arizona, as you have already noted) has burst, and with it most of the excess equity that could flow to places like Durango.

JL: Given what I think is coming soon to our energy/transportation system in this country, I think that is a big fat assumption that most people are making that is not likely to stay true. I predict that within 5 years or so air travel out of rural Colorado will be unaffordable to all but the most wealthy patrons, if service is available at all.

It is a big fat assumption probably associated with a political point of view on the fringe. For what reasons do you make this prediction, and how specifically would it affect the OP's decision of whether or not to take a job offer in Durango?

It's not a political "fringe" view. I happen to be a moderate conservative who can see the fundamental problems this country faces. And it is my studied opinion that Durango's geographical locale is going to put it at a severe disadvantage in the environment that lies ahead.

JL: Then all those yuppie and bourgeoisie travelers will be left to mix it up with we serfs on the decaying rural Colorado highways--if they or we can afford or get the fuel.

Why will they not be able to afford the gasoline, and when? Denver has the lowest gas prices in the nation according to the news yesterday (Jan 21, 2010). Why does Colorado have "decaying" highways?


Last question first. Colorado, like everyplace else, has decaying roads because costs to maintain them in now rapidly exceeding what can be generated in revenue to maintain and rebuild them. In case you've had your head buried in the sand somewhere, this nation is in a crisis of crumbling infrastructure. As to the bigger picture, why don't you read this--then maybe you will "get" that bigger picture (but I doubt it).

http://www.simmonsco-intl.com/files/AON%20Annual%20Energy%20Insurance%20Symposium.pdf (broken link)


Interesting times ahead.

Meaning what, specifically?
In the same sense that the Great Depression and World War II were "interesting." Disastrous, savage, but interesting. Events that cause dramatic changes in the course of history usually are "interesting."
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Old 01-22-2010, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Durango, CO
118 posts, read 268,052 times
Reputation: 184
Jazz, just curious, do you have a lot of canned goods and firearms on your property?
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Old 01-22-2010, 09:26 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,099,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jchasse View Post
Jazz, just curious, do you have a lot of canned goods and firearms on your property?
Not really, because I don't think it is those kinds of things that allow a person to survive hard times. What is the key to survival is having reliable and trustworthy friends and/or family in a functioning community, and the life and work skills that will allow you to survive in a difficult socio-economic environment. Both of my parents lived through the entire Great Depression. They didn't own guns or a horde of food. What they both did have was friends and family, a good work ethic, varied life and career skills, and a whole lot of good common sense. They didn't have much during the Depression, but they managed to get and keep jobs, make enough money to survive (and even save a little), and still manage to be happy. Despite the hardships, neither of them thought of it as a dark part of their lives. That was saved for World War II, when my Dad was overseas from 1942-45--very much in harm's way--and was home for one 30 day leave that entire time. During the rest of the time, they never ONCE communicated except by censored letters. That was really hard on both of them, but they certainly weren't alone in that regard. My Mom summed it up, "It was rough, but I was blessed, at least your Dad finally came home--a lot of 'em didn't." We just think we're tough these days--those folks in the "Greatest Generation" were the real deal.
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