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Old 03-26-2010, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,567 posts, read 2,287,392 times
Reputation: 1605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
This was in the news today. To be honest I am going to wait and see what they find as Pueblo has more then enough water for any kind of growth we could see this century, including Pueblo Springs. That being said more water is always good so I will keep my eye on it.

"Hoping to shore up future growth, a coalition of water users in Colorado and Wyoming announced a two-year project Thursday to study building a pipeline from the Flaming Gorge Reservoir on the Wyoming-Utah border to the Front Range of Wyoming and Colorado."

The link: Colorado, Wyoming groups to study Flaming Gorge water pipeline | SkyHiDailyNews.com
Whiskey is for drinkin...
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Old 03-26-2010, 10:36 AM
Status: "CSU Pueblo football is ranked 2nd in the nation!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
10,105 posts, read 11,051,255 times
Reputation: 3027
^

Agreed. That is why I am going to sit back and watch as Pueblo has more then enough water so our economic outcome is not tied to this deal like some other cities in the state.
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Old 05-01-2010, 01:52 PM
 
17,117 posts, read 23,475,534 times
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California snowpack, the state's main source of water, is 143% of normal after the heavy snows of April. This is twice the snowpack of last year, not enough to officially end a 3-year drought, but still a very good season for snow in California.

Colorado snowpack is reported at 72% of normal as of late April.
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Old 05-01-2010, 02:07 PM
 
7,969 posts, read 15,333,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
California snowpack, the state's main source of water, is 143% of normal after the heavy snows of April. This is twice the snowpack of last year, not enough to officially end a 3-year drought, but still a very good season for snow in California.

Colorado snowpack is reported at 72% of normal as of late April.
That is not unusual in an "El Niño" year--that is, for California to get a lot of late winter/early spring precipitation. Unfortunately, it often means that the Pacific Northwest and the northern Rockies get severe drought. If one looks at the drought monitor, that is exactly what is happening. Note on this one that severe drought is extending clear into the Canadian Provinces and may have some severe impacts on Canadian agricultural production. Not good. Also, with British Columbia under full assault by the mountain pine beetle in their lodgepole forests, they could beat Colorado in having all that dead timber "light up" this summer. Note that western Wyoming is also in severe drought--that is the Green River drainage that those water buffalo slimeballs think will solve all of Colorado's water problems if they can just divert it. Not too bright an idea when one looks at how many years of the last decade or so have been drier than normal in that drainage.

Drought map: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate...adm-201003.jpg

Drought discussion: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate...arr-201003.pdf
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Old 05-01-2010, 02:10 PM
 
7,969 posts, read 15,333,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
That is not unusual in an "El Niño" year--that is, for California to get a lot of late winter/early spring precipitation. Unfortunately, it often means that the Pacific Northwest and the northern Rockies get severe drought. If one looks at the drought monitor, that is exactly what is happening. Note on this one that severe drought is extending clear into the Canadian Provinces and may have some severe impacts on Canadian agricultural production. Not good. Also, with British Columbia under full assault by the mountain pine beetle in their lodgepole forests, they could beat Colorado in having all that dead timber "light up" this summer. Note that western Wyoming is also in severe drought--that is the Green River drainage that those water buffalo slimeballs think will solve all of Colorado's water problems if they can just divert it. Not too bright an idea when one looks at how many years of the last decade or so have been drier than normal in that drainage.

Drought map: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate...adm-201003.jpg

Drought discussion: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate...arr-201003.pdf
Oh, and 72% of normal this late in the snowpack season is pretty much teetering into the "real troubling" territory for having adequate water supplies. Fortunately, the reservoirs are generally in pretty good shape, but even they are of little use if a drought lasts more than a year or two.
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Old 05-01-2010, 02:17 PM
Status: "CSU Pueblo football is ranked 2nd in the nation!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
10,105 posts, read 11,051,255 times
Reputation: 3027
It depends where you live in Colorado as the Arkansas river basin is above normal. This is a month old but since then they have had even more snow. In fact the Pueblo Reservoir is at or near record levels. This is one reason I am a advocate of enlarging the reservoir so in good years it can hold more water for the lean years that will come.

"While statewide snowpack levels remain at 88 percent of average, the Arkansas River Basin made up for past deficits by increasing to 109 percent of average."

The link: Denied:1up! Software () (http://www.themountainmail.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=1883 9 - broken link)

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Old 05-03-2010, 09:22 AM
 
17,117 posts, read 23,475,534 times
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The April 2010 issue of National Geographic Magazine is dedicated to the topic of water, with articles on all parts of the world.

A couple of links to Nat Geo Mag

- The April 2010 issue, all about water, with tons of superb pix

- Drying of the West (Feb 2008)

- Articles on the topic of WATER
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Old 05-03-2010, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Hills & Hollers of the Aux Arcs
18,742 posts, read 15,366,458 times
Reputation: 16579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
The April 2010 issue of National Geographic Magazine is dedicated to the topic of water, with articles on all parts of the world.
Quite an eye-opener, wasn't it? We left the SW last year and it's nice to live somewhere that's green all summer, instead of brown, where no one seems to have sprinklers because Mother Nature is taking care of her own. But we have children and grandchildren in northern California and this year's snow pack notwithstanding, we're concerned for them given the fragility of the San Joaquin delta and the constant internecine struggles between California, its cities/counties, Oregon and Arizona regarding this limited resource.

People don't seem to realize that the availability of water really is finite.
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Old 05-03-2010, 09:59 AM
 
13,043 posts, read 11,767,776 times
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Curmudgeon is right. Those are good articles. Thanks for that info Mike!
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Old 05-03-2010, 10:05 AM
 
6,319 posts, read 3,293,353 times
Reputation: 3486
Not only that..the sky is falling
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