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Old 12-29-2011, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,576 posts, read 1,482,207 times
Reputation: 1462

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
You constantly harp about agricultural water use....
Where exactly was Mike "harping"? He made a statement. Which he backed up with a reference. That's not "harping".
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Old 12-29-2011, 04:31 PM
Status: "CSU P football is the NCAA D2 national champions!" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
10,375 posts, read 12,046,609 times
Reputation: 3140
I have heard doom and gloom scenario since I was a kid in the 70's in part due to the exponential growth of the population. However technology, also, advances at a exponential rate especially information technology. That is how we have been able to keep up with the population growth without any of the doom and gloom and there is no reason to think we will not be the case for the next 100 years.
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Old 12-29-2011, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,576 posts, read 1,482,207 times
Reputation: 1462
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Per population in Colorado, the 1860 census had 34,277* people living in Colorado. This serves as a good baseline, as much before that date a negligible European population of fur trappers and other adventurers. But beginning July 1858 with the Pikes Peak Gold Rush, or Colorado Gold Rush if you prefer, all that changed. So radically so, and due eastern politics and the onset of the Civil War, that the Colorado Territory was born shortly thereafter on February 28, 1861.

By 1890 the population had swelled to 413,249 Coloradoans, although this figure still possibly not counting the Native Americans having been displaced, but some still here.

In 1930 the number topped a million for the first time, at 1,035,79. Two million for the first time in 1970, at 2,207,259. The official number 4,301,262 in 2000. And, as many are aware, Colorado recently having passed the 5 million mark.

This is a good example of exponential growth, and if unsure the term ask your broker what compound interest means. All the more as Colorado's population is projected to double to 10 million before 2050.

There are a number of reasons why that may not come to pass. But should it, then the math is easy. Double the number of residences, cars on the roads, and people at your favorite campground and hiking trail. Subtract by half all available resources shared, such as water, timber, agricultural products. Particularly the later are variable, as so often trans-shipped and from elsewhere. So perhaps use the greater calculus of a single planet, and do the math on 7 billion sharing all resources, and the projected 9 billion before 2050.

Another way of looking at this might be if your wife found a mouse in the kitchen. She will probably not care if it happens to represent less than 1% of all the mice out in the woods or in the subdivision. It is still one mouse to many. Or try convincing her otherwise.

At some point just one more is too much.
* Statistics from Wikipedia
So I guess you're saying that no more "outsiders" should be allowed into Colorado? And of course, you'll agree that the opposite should also be true -- that no Coloradan who happens to find a job in a state with greater population density should be allowed to accept that job. Of course, that would mean that Coloradans wouldn't be able to move into 36 other states where they are the outsiders.

Or, are we all Americans with the freedom to live where we wish?
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Old 12-29-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Northern Arizona
1,248 posts, read 2,102,134 times
Reputation: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Or, are we all Americans with the freedom to live where we wish?
So long as its not within the boundaries of the State of Colorado, then yes.

I almost feel bad for entertaining the thought of moving to Colorado based on what I've seen posted on this forum. Then I remember that I currently live in Arizona. God forbid there be more job opportunites in my line of work in metro Denver than metro Phoenix...

Last edited by buckeyenative01; 12-29-2011 at 05:15 PM..
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Old 12-29-2011, 05:53 PM
 
2,211 posts, read 3,614,433 times
Reputation: 2433
Wink As defined by a higher power

If the immediate question here is Colorado, and the welfare of its citizens, as of course in relation to water resources, that boundary can be expanded. If more comfortable with a more definite boundary, then the sphere of this Earth, as a single home confined by all limitless space beyond. Although of course some now with an interest in distant planets perhaps habitable, should conditions become too uncomfortable here.

Each state in this union probably should look closely to its own resources, and how best used and applied. Or as a combined union then a single nation within a world of nations. But at last these are only political boundaries. The end results determined by the will of mankind.

Although, one may notice, Mother Nature with her own rules and agenda. That is beyond anyone's opinion.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
1,587 posts, read 1,940,882 times
Reputation: 2596
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
Subtract by half all available resources shared, such as water, timber, agricultural products. Particularly the later are variable, as so often trans-shipped and from elsewhere. So perhaps use the greater calculus of a single planet, and do the math on 7 billion sharing all resources, and the projected 9 billion before 2050.
So...I guess it wouldn't matter much if I moved back to Colorado then, because, one team, one world right?

Seriously, I just roll my eyes at the "you'll take a job from a native!" crowd or "not enough resources!". I originally grew up in a state with the same "issues" (Oregon) of natives trying to keep population growth down, and failing, and generally that attitude really just means "I have mine, so screw everybody else." And yes, I'm a native, third generation, from that state-but you don't catch me trying to use it as a lame and ridiculous excuse to try to shut out people who want to enjoy the same natural benefits I was blessed with by an ACCIDENT OF BIRTH. Oregon isn't the same as it was when I grew up because of the growth. World didn't end because of it, either-they changed and adapted.

I know this runs counter to several frequent "Colorado native's" opinions, and I know Jazz will come back with something like "but I have a close personal friend who deals with population growth who totally agrees with only my opinion!"

Don't care, and your opinion means exactly zilch to me. At some point, it becomes tiresome. People move, Americans move, to where they want to live and you'll just have to deal with it rather than whine about how it shouldn't be. Having a family who moved there 100 years earlier didn't give you some inalienable right to be the only people to live in Colorado.

You'll be happy to know I'm currently supervising someone who (gasp!) MOVED FROM Colorado, so I guess I booked my space there. Not that I care if I did or not, or if you care or not. See you in about 15 years in the Front Range megalopolis, MegaDenver One.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,576 posts, read 1,482,207 times
Reputation: 1462
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post

...

Oregon isn't the same as it was when I grew up because of the growth. World didn't end because of it, either-they changed and adapted.
Exactly. Western New York State isn't the same as it was when I grew up there in the 1950s. Maryland isn't the same as it was when I worked and lived there in the 1970s. Northern Virginia isn't the same as it was when I worked and lived there from the 1980s until recently. All of those states (and virtually every other state) grew, changed, and adapted.
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Old 12-30-2011, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Northern Arizona
1,248 posts, read 2,102,134 times
Reputation: 608
Southwestern Ohio got better after I left, so...um?
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:42 AM
 
13,241 posts, read 12,475,989 times
Reputation: 38846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post

Although, one may notice, Mother Nature with her own rules and agenda. That is beyond anyone's opinion.
Yes.

The headline of this mornings Denver Post states "Lagging snowpack cools hopes for Spring" According to the story, statewide Colorado snowpack is 73% of average, making it the fourth driest measurement in the last 30 years. No river basin is above average. According to the illustration the front range and the plains are between 84% to 89%. Northwestern Colorado has the lowest rating at 63%.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:25 AM
 
1,120 posts, read 1,617,987 times
Reputation: 1405
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckeyenative01 View Post
So long as its not within the boundaries of the State of Colorado, then yes.

I almost feel bad for entertaining the thought of moving to Colorado based on what I've seen posted on this forum. Then I remember that I currently live in Arizona. God forbid there be more job opportunites in my line of work in metro Denver than metro Phoenix...
Fortunately this kind of thinking only appears in these forums. I've yet to encounter people like this in person. Never had anyone I spoke to care if I was a native or not. People tend to be more vocal about such matters when they are hiding behind the safety of their computer.
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