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Old 03-07-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Colorado
18,723 posts, read 4,729,909 times
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Son and Daughter chose to go where their friends went.
Son chose Boulder, graduated, liked where he went.
Daughter chose Fort Collins, graduated, liked where she went.
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Old 03-07-2010, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,100 posts, read 99,245,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pekemom View Post
Son and Daughter chose to go where their friends went.
Son chose Boulder, graduated, liked where he went.
Daughter chose Fort Collins, graduated, liked where she went.
That's great that they both graduated and were happy where they went.
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Old 03-10-2010, 11:36 AM
 
480 posts, read 1,019,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I was with you all the way to here. Who determines what "normal" is? Maybe they don't have a "Naked Pumpkin Run" in Ft. Collins, but I'm sure they have some other wack-o stuff.
Actually, they do have an undie run in FoCo. Not as exciting as a naked pumpkin run, but at least there's no risk of being charged as a sex offender.
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Old 03-13-2010, 04:38 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,951 times
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Default Boulder Vs. Ft. Collins As College Towns

Quote:
Originally Posted by [U
lrmsd[/u];13172239]**************
True,and to add to what you have said,having lived in both boulder and longmont,and familiar iwth fort collins [and i've also lived in missoula and eugene]BOTH of these college towns in CO are fantastic-and that is rare! Eugene IMO is no longer great,even though it is compared to Boulder. Corvallis,however,as the land grant insitution-is what you read about. It truly is that bucolic college town.
While Bozeman is nearly equal with Missoula by now in terms of quality of life and amenities,as well. MT and CO are the exceptions,in my experience,of land grants equalling the Univ. as a desireable place to live.

In many ways,fort collins is now what boulder was.

Boulder is still a top notch town-not only for university,but for anything-we studied alternative stuff there-and from technology to athletics [olympic athletes training]to holistic health and academics,THE best of the best is in Boulder. And I lived in SFO,Boston and currently San diego-I still find Boulder rates with them,despite being only 100k population.

Fort Collins,true,does not have what Boulder does. But it truly IS the college town you read about-there is a reason it makes all the top ten lists,same as Corvallis Oregon.

It's rare to find towns walking their talk. And fort collins does.
Boulder still has bike trails and a great infrastructure/location. But anyone looking for bucolic and low key,focused mainly on the university,would prefer fort collins these days....same with corvallis over eugene. [though eugene has deteriorated in other ways that boulder has not. boulder is yuppie,but it's economy has grown and expanded. It has grown up as a town/city,from a college enclave to an actual city,and has done a fine job of it.]

As you can see,I cannot vote for either one. It's a tie.(:
City-Data Senior Member "lmrsd" has some of the best comparisons of college towns on City-Data. They have discussed Oregon w/ me on other forums, and I agree with their comparison here that Ft. Collins is more bucolic and laid back than Boulder, just as Corvallis is more bucolic compared to Eugene. Eugene is a meth city, full of gangs, to be avoided at all costs! I don't know when Eugene collapsed, to my understanding, there were no drugs there in the early 1970's.

I would also give Ft. Collins and Boulder a tie, although I'd prefer to live in Ft. Collins because I cannot stand the traffic and weather in Boulder. Boulder experiences an annual average wind speed of at least 50% higher than Ft. Collins all year along, and is among the windiest cities in the US along w/ Colorado Springs.

However, of all the college towns I've spent time in Colorado, Durango is my favorite - Ft. Lewis College on a mesa overlooking the town and the San Juan Mountains. The location cannnot be beat, and Durango is the most scenic college town along with Ashland, Oregon; Corvallis, Oregon; Flagstaff, AZ; and Seattle, WA.

Ft. Collins and Corvallis do not share as much of the "hipster" image that Boulder has, in other words, Boulder is very trendy and yuppie. Boulder is too yuppie for me, but not intolerable, as Scottsdale is. Whether one is more liberal than the other, I don't know. Whether one receives more snowfall than the other, I don't know, but that would be important to consider if one is a runner or bicyclist.
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Old 03-13-2010, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Consider_Again View Post
I disagree. I have worked with ChE, Mech. and Pet. engineers from both schools. In my opinion UC Boulder has a very good engineering program. Nothing against a CSM grad, but giving the choice between the two above schools, I would attend UCB.

UCB provides a broader educational experience and while it is totally my perception, UCB grads seem happier with their college experience than CSM. CSM does seem to try to distill a sense of “work ethic” to their students. Academically, neither school seems distinguishable from the other.

I know next to nothing about CSU-Ft. Collins except they have the only vet school I am aware of in the state.

Disclaimer: I am not an alumnus from a Colorado school.
I am not an alum of any Colorado school either, though both my kids are.

That said, I have friends whose kids have gone to Mines and I also know some CU engineering students and recent grads. CU does offer a broader experience, IMO. Mines students don't even have to take a writing course, and communications is a part of every job.

Academically, US News ranks CU's engineering school as #34 and CSM as #51. Now their rankings are not the "Holy Grail" IMO, but they are fairly accurate. CSM students (and their parents) like to tell everyone how hard Mines is, though.
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Old 03-14-2010, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
10,337 posts, read 10,514,981 times
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ROUGH 'EM UP! ROUGH 'EM UP! GO C-U!

Did I just give myself away? I'm a CU grad but became a CSU Rams when my family moved to Colorado from the Los Angeles area. (Thank God they did!) Now that I'm out of school, I can like the Rams again, and as long as they aren't playing the Buffalos, I wish them well.

I think highly of Colorado State University, even as a Colorado grad.

As for Boulder-vs Fort Collins I think that they are a both great towns. They are both in Colorado, so you really can't go wrong!

Bring on the Rocky Mountain Showdown!
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Old 03-19-2010, 08:34 PM
 
3 posts, read 6,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Mines students don't even have to take a writing course, and communications is a part of every job.
I graduated from Mines, and I was required to take a communication course! Actually, I was required to take 4 communication courses during my freshman and sophomore years known as EPICS I, EPICS II, EPICS III, & EPICS IV. I had a friend who transferred to CU-Boulder after his sophomore year, and they awarded him an automatic Minor in Communication because of these four freshman and sophomore level courses. Furthermore, he only had to take another 3 additional junior and senior level courses at Boulder in order to earn a Major in Communications!

The EPICS program was designed to teach students how to present complex, scientific information to any other public event populated by concerned citizens. Engineers are required to present technical information to individuals that never had the scientific training. The Epics Program was designed to overcome the student's fear of public speaking so he (or she) can better present the information to a crowded council chamber, a board of trustees, or a meeting of five or six "experts" with advanced degrees in social sciences from CU.

Not only was each student required to present three or four public presentations, we were required to write memos, technical reports, and scientific white papers on our specific projects. We had to conduct meetings and record the minutes of each meeting. The final for each course was a massive report and presentation on our projects. Each team member was required to give at least a 5-10 minute public presentation during this final presentation.

Everyone hated these classes. Engineers are by nature introverts, and Epics forced us introverts to stand in front of a crowd and speak. An introvert would rather have his fingernails removed with a pair pliers than speak in front of a crowd. Furthermore, I probably wrote about 3 or 4 "full length novels" worth of reports during my Epics classes. Of course, the subject matter is dull and boring. Only five people on the planet is interested in reading this information, and three of them where my Epics' team members, and I think the other two was the professor and the public representative. Of all the classes I took at Mines, the four Epics classes are by far the most widely used subject matter.

And that's only the beginning! Every engineering project requires a book of general specifications, construction specifications, and contract documents. These "books" are about as thick as the next Harry Potter novel. I believe that engineers write more books than a professional writer. No one wants to read our books, and I don't blame them. Construction Specifications on the Proper Density of Asphalt for a Road Reconstruction Project is not going to appear on the best seller list anytime this century.

It was at Mines were I was introduced to this voluminous ton that's a cure to insomnia. I took at least three different writing classes, two of them were required for my major, to prepare myself to write specifications. The one optional class at Mines was writing creative fiction taught by Joanne Greenberg. She wrote I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, a semi-autobiographical novel about her battle with schizophrenia. It was also at Mines that I started writing poetry, and I have published several poems of my own during the mid-1990's in a couple of poetry anthologies. I also took two classes in Middle Eastern history a class in Classical Music Appreciation at Mines. True, all three of these classes were optional. Actually, my uncle wanted me to take the Classical Music Appreciation class because he was a conductor for two of the symphonies in the metro-Denver area. The Middle Eastern history classes were offered because there is a significant minority of Arab students at Mines. (Petroleum Engineering - why else would there be Arab students?)

The point, I have defiantly received what someone from Boulder or Fort Collins would call a "rounded Renaissance education" at the Colorado School of Mines.
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Old 03-20-2010, 01:52 AM
 
857 posts, read 1,352,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cre8engr View Post
I graduated from Mines, and I was required to take a communication course! Actually, I was required to take 4 communication courses during my freshman and sophomore years known as EPICS I, EPICS II, EPICS III, & EPICS IV.

The EPICS program was designed to teach students how to present complex, scientific information to any other public event populated by concerned citizens. Engineers are required to present technical information to individuals that never had the scientific training. The Epics Program was designed to overcome the student's fear of public speaking so he (or she) can better present the information to a crowded council chamber, a board of trustees, or a meeting of five or six "experts" with advanced degrees in social sciences from CU.

(truncation)
That is fascinating about the Colorado School of Mines. Great post. Colorado School of Mines is correct that scientists and engineers are introverts, and should learn communications skills ... especially when presenting technical information to elected officials and the general public.

The same can be said for economists and geographers who should also learn communication skills, to present information to the public and elected officials on natural resources and land use policy.

I wasn't required to take any communications or speech courses as an undergraduate, and it's been a struggle.
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Old 03-20-2010, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
4,923 posts, read 8,947,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
CU does offer a broader experience, IMO. Mines students don't even have to take a writing course, and communications is a part of every job.
Of course CU offers a broader experience. Mines doesn't bill itself as a broad education. It's an engineering school, period. The students who go there want to be engineers.

Quote:
CSM students (and their parents) like to tell everyone how hard Mines is, though.
It's very difficult. It's the hardest education you'll experience, the same caliber of education you'll get if you go to CalTech, MIT or something like that.
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Old 03-20-2010, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,100 posts, read 99,245,659 times
Reputation: 31579
I do not want to get into a fight over CU vs Mines, especially when the thread is supposed to be about CU vs CSU. I guess that's how it is here, CU vs Everyshcool.

I do disagree that CSM's coursework is the hardest ever, on a par with Cal Tech or MIT, as those schools are ranked much higher.
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