U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Celebrating Memorial Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-24-2010, 03:53 PM
 
12,842 posts, read 24,473,188 times
Reputation: 18835

Advertisements

Friend in Montrose said the wind has been steadily around 50mph, and gusts up to 87 in the passes. No summer in sight.
The Ridgway Sun had a photo of a 4-H girl on her horse, with the San Juans behind her. Snow almost all the way down the mountains.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2010, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,521 posts, read 11,628,203 times
Reputation: 24173
May 24, 2010, 4 P.M
BEAVER FIRE UPDATE


Norwood, Colo. – Fire officials have taken advantage of the cooler, wetter weather to begin to make progress on a 3,200-acre fire near Norwood today.

With the smoke cleared and the winds lessened, firefighters have begun to construct a line around the Beaver Fire to the north and east of Highway 145 near Norwood. The fire has so far burned about 2,500 acres on the Uncompahgre National Forest, and nearly 700 acres of land managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Crews are also working to clear hazardous trees along the San Miguel River, where the fire was sparked by downed power lines on Saturday afternoon. Officials hope to open that stretch of river between Beaver Creek and the Norwood Bridge

Fueled by wind gusts up to 50 miles an hour at times, the fire burned into MacKenzie Creek Canyon yesterday.

Officials will hold a public meeting tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. to share information about the fire with local residents at the Norwood Town Hall at 1670 Naturita Street

About 180 firefighters remain on the fire today. They are assessing the situation after high fire activity yesterday followed by the weather change overnight. A type II fire management team arrived last night and is preparing to take over management of the fire today.

No structures have been burned and no homes have been evacuated at this time.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2010, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,521 posts, read 11,628,203 times
Reputation: 24173
Montrose Interagency
Fire Management

Bureau of Land Management * Colorado State Forest Service * National Park Service * US Forest Service
FIRE UPDATE
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 7:30 a.m


Norwood, Colo. – Fire crews continued to make significant progress on the Beaver Fire Tuesday. Weather conditions remained stable throughout the day; however fire officials are expecting warmer, dryer conditions today with an increase in winds. Crews will continue to secure the perimeter of the fire and monitor areas of fire within the fire perimeter.

There is a high potential for falling trees along the San Miguel River in the fire area. The river is open from the south to the Beaver Recreation Area and north of the fire’s location. The river remains closed through the fire zone. Hwy 145 remains open, however travelers are asked to use caution due to ongoing fire operations along the river corridor

]Incident Commander Todd Pechota, and members of the Incident Management Team, met with local officials and citizens on Tuesday to share the current status of the Beaver Fire. He commented that “the Incident Management Team is working with the public land managers and San Miguel County officials to control the fire and to continue to provide for firefighter and community safety.” Fire officials are working with the land management agencies to plan for rehabilitation of the suppression efforts.

The fire size has been downsized to 2,525 acres due to crews being able to obtain more detailed information about the burned areas on the north and west of Hwy 145. Of the 2,525 acres burned, 2,091 acres are on land managed by the Norwood Ranger District (USFS) and 434 acres on lands managed by the Uncompahgre Field Office (BLM).

No structures have been damaged or are currently threatened. There have been no injuries on the fire
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2010, 08:39 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
There is a Red Flag Warning out for tomorrow from the National Weather Service.

Quote:
... Red flag warning remains in effect from 11 am to 9 PM MDT
Thursday for the lower elevations of southwest Colorado for
strong winds... low relative humidity and dry fuels...
It is never a good sign when things are drying out and fire danger is high already in May.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2010, 08:34 AM
 
16,168 posts, read 20,176,426 times
Reputation: 46688
It sure isn't. Am watching 11 news right now and they are calling for 35 to 40 m.p.h. winds in Montrose and Grand Junction today as another cold front is pushing warm air in. Today we should have our first 90 degree day of the year. By Saturday the weather people are calling for a 15 to 20 degree drop, with strong winds through Saturday.

We could easily have a campfire ban here in Mesa County pretty soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2010, 09:21 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
One of the problems in a strong "El Niño" year is that the strong westerly winds can persist well into June or later, which impedes the westward incursion of the expanding Bermuda High into the region. That's bad for fire danger because it is the expanding Bermuda High that causes the Southwest Monsoon in July and August that brings moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of California into the region. No monsoon means low summer precipitation, which--of course--means bad fire problems. Whether that happens this year is still up in the air (the US Drought Monitor forecasts predict an equal chance of wetter or drier than normal summer precipitation in the southern Rockies, but predict a hotter than normal summer west of the Continental Divide), but the weather for the past couple of weeks is not encouraging. The nightmare scenario (which I've seen several times in western Colorado over the years) is a normal to wet winter, followed by a dry late spring and early summer, followed by a weak Southwest Monsoon--with the monsoon just strong enough to spawn a lot of dry thunderstorms with abundant lightning. If that scenario were to occur--and push far north enough into central and northern Colorado to reach the tinder-dry dead and dying lodgepole forests, we could be in for that "Biblical" fire event that could eliminate a lot of dead lodgepole (and no small number of trophy houses and other man-made crap) in the central and northern Colorado mountains. The southern Colorado mountains are actually in a little better shape, since lodgepole is not found there in any appreciable quantities and there have been more fires over the years in many places--which reduces some of the fuel buildup.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2010, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
Misery loves company says an old cliche. Another problem in a strong "El Niño" year is the increase in the number and intensity of hurricnaes in the Atlantic basin. It's been pretty quiet over there the past few years. Maybe this year is the year of the BIG one. Now if we could redirect some of the extra water from the hurricanic deluge to put out our fires...that would be a tremendous win win situation to lessen the misery of everyone involved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2010, 11:16 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,095,377 times
Reputation: 9065
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
Misery loves company says an old cliche. Another problem in a strong "El Niño" year is the increase in the number and intensity of hurricnaes in the Atlantic basin. It's been pretty quiet over there the past few years. Maybe this year is the year of the BIG one. Now if we could obtain some of the extra water from the hurricanic deluge to put out our fires...that would be a tremendous win win situation.
Don't wish for that. Several of the worst floods in southwest Colorado were caused by the remnants of a Pacific hurricane slamming into the Southwest. I personally witnessed one of them, in southwestern Colorado, on Labor Day weekend, 1970. Though, if one did happen again, it would clean out all of that resort ghetto yuppie trash development in the Animas Valley north of Durango--that might be worth it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,754 posts, read 16,450,212 times
Reputation: 9287
Your mention of flooding makes me wonder if the big flood on the Virgin River over in St George a few years ago was also caused by Pacific hurricane remnants?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2010, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
10,521 posts, read 11,628,203 times
Reputation: 24173
May 27 UPDATE

Norwood, Colo. – Fire crews continued to make significant progress on the Beaver Fire. The anticipated increase in wind did not materialize on Wednesday; however fire officials are expecting warmer, dryer conditions to continue today along with an increase in winds.

There is a Red Flag Warning for the area from 11 am to 9 pm due to the high temperatures, low relative humidity and dry fuels. A Red Flag Warning indicates that the potential for large fire growth exists in the area. Fire Behavior Analyst Rod Moraga said, “the Red Flag Warning is not likely to affect the Beaver Fire perimeter, but conditions could possibly lead to new fire activity in the area.”

Crews will continue to construct the remaining fireline and monitor areas of fire within the fire perimeter today. A Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) Team, which was requested by the local agencies, has arrived and will begin assessing rehabilitation to the fire area.

If you own a home in a fire-prone area, you should take a few simple steps to make your property more defensible. It will increase your safety and that of firefighters, too. What you do before and during fire season may make the difference whether your home survives in the event of a wildfire in your area

No structures have been damaged or are currently threatened. There have been no injuries associated with the fire. Hwy 145 remains open, however travelers are asked to use caution due to ongoing fire operations along the river corridor


Beaver Fire Statistics at a Glance
  • Time/Date Started: May 22, 2010 approximately 3:00 p.m.
  • Location: Norwood, Colorado
  • Cause: Downed Power Line
  • Estimated Cost: $925,885
  • Fuels: Pinyon –Juniper, mixed conifer, grass-sage
  • Size: 2,610 acres (2,188 – USFS, 422 – BLM)
  • Containment: 60%
  • Resources Committed:
4 type one crews, 1 type two crews, 1 type one helicopter, 1 type three helicopter, 13 engines, 1 dozers, 2 water tenders, 266 personnel.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Colorado
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top