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Old 03-16-2017, 11:51 AM
 
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Boulder city population is 1/3rd of county's. If city / county views were completely polarized the county folk are the majority. But the views are probably not clearly divided simply by city / county residence. The residence by district requirement / map is important and will be redrawn in 2021. Conceivably if Boulder city doesn't grow as much as rest of county and gets split into the other districts, the County Commission should end up with more Commissioners living in Boulder city. If Boulder were split into 2-3 evenly, they could have better chance at 2 or more but also some risk of none. Split just a little into one or both of the others (strategically) and the upside chance exists without much risk. Folks that really care who has the power should probably pay attention to / participate in the redistricting.


But as much as districts matter, it also matters who runs, what their priorities are, how much money they can raise, what media and community group support they get, etc.

Last edited by NW Crow; 03-16-2017 at 12:32 PM..
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Old 03-16-2017, 12:06 PM
 
22,950 posts, read 42,027,150 times
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Almost a decade later the views and predictions of the OP are largely true, especially for COLO SPGS.

Aurora has not and will not become a mess as the OP predicted. It's too close to Denver to go downhill, it will gentrify to support greater Denver, i.e., Location Location Location.

The nation has recovered from the recession though COLO SPGS keeps limping along, entwined in a death spiral with TABOR.

Despite the doom and gloom of some posters, the USA and world are awash in both crude oil and natural gas. Depressed prices have driven our oil industry to automate much of the work in the shale plays to where they can break even at $35/bbl, though it has put a number of oil workers out of a job.

Most of the industrial jobs that "left" actually never left, they simply were automated away. Though a lot of manufacturing is done in China there is a growing resurgence of manufacturing in the USA as technology lowers the labor costs to where being close to markets and avoiding ocean shipping costs and lead times increasingly factor into business decisions.

The Denver metro area, Boulder and Fort Collins will continue to be attractive places to work and live which will exert upwards pressure on prices.

COLO SPGS will continue to be a military town and be popular with military retirees. Some people will choose the far north end of the city and El Paso County as a bedroom community of the Denver area to avoid the high prices up there, despite the hellish commute. Relief will arrive in 4-7 years as the state finally widens I-25.

Pueblo will be the choice of retirees on a budget, which IMO is far better than the bug infested miasma of Florida and its white trash crowd.
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Old 03-16-2017, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,688 posts, read 2,903,957 times
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I don't entirely agree that Cos is on the verge of tanking. It has had a slow recovery and overall growth in the state does bring coattail benefits to Cos, but I would say the worst parts are over.

The past decade's stagnation is fading and things are turning around and even over the past several months traction has been gained in numerous areas.

*Dumping Mayor Bach, whose myopic vision best benefited all his developer buddies, was a good step forward.
*Suthers has experience dealing with statewide issues and understands the legal impact of city decisions and can better guide the process to avoid those pitfalls. He has finally started to work with neighboring governments to reach consensus on improvements.
*The Mayor's office and city council are finally working together.
*The 2C tax was enacted for roadway improvement.
*I-25 widening is finally getting state attention.
*City government has finally figured out how to word ballot issues so voters will understand the impact of what they are voting for which has resulted in several project approvals.
*Several significant urban renewal projects have the green light to proceed forward.
*Two major interstate interchanges are undergoing significant overhauls.
*Several mid rise apartment complex are under construction at the city center.
*We have more job openings than have been open for a decade (and construction is not the lead contender).
*The County and key employers and several educational institutions are doing quarterly reviews of enrollments, job openings, career track, and skill gap analysis to adjust educational programs.
*CU is dumping millions into their campus here.
*Cos manufacturing community has organized itself is working in alignment with a similar organization in NorCo to present a statewide capability to companies looking to relocate.
*Doug Bruce has reveal what a hypocrite he is to a lot of previously unaware people.

There is still a lot of hard work ahead and overcoming apathy in a large segment of the city is still an ongoing concern, but some really great improvements are finally happening.
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:31 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,010 posts, read 687,743 times
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Colorado Springs dumping? Rapidly rising home prices, low unemployment, great rating as far as places to live, finally getting the street repair done, strong push to widen I-25. You could do worse.
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Old 03-18-2017, 10:11 AM
 
3,855 posts, read 3,193,559 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
Colorado Springs dumping? Rapidly rising home prices, low unemployment, great rating as far as places to live, finally getting the street repair done, strong push to widen I-25. You could do worse.
I think it's mildly improving:
  • They've fixed or are fixing a number of the bad traffic spots
  • the roads have gotten smoother
  • downtown has a revitalization plan in the works (needed because CO Springs needs some sort of centralized place with things to do)
  • unemployment hasn't increased, despite not having much of an economic engine or any corporate move ins / corporate growth and a lot of people moving in
  • The military will be doing alright for a little while now


The thing that bothers me still about the Springs, which is starting to show now, but could be worse in 2030, is the steady flow of money out of pretty much the whole center doughnut of the city. Unless CO Springs can pull a Denver and have steep enough rising prices and an attractive enough center to make people revitalize this area, a LOT of the city will be kinda run down and not an attractive place to live, while the outsides keep expanding. Areas like Cimarron Hills and the S Academy IMO have gotten worse and will continue to get worse because they aren't revitalized.
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Old 03-18-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Eastern Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDog View Post
Colorado Springs dumping? Rapidly rising home prices, low unemployment, great rating as far as places to live, finally getting the street repair done, strong push to widen I-25. You could do worse.
These posts are from over 9 years ago, and reality is Colorado Springs took a pretty big hit for a couple of years there.
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Old 03-18-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,688 posts, read 2,903,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
The thing that bothers me still about the Springs, which is starting to show now, but could be worse in 2030, is the steady flow of money out of pretty much the whole center doughnut of the city.
I agree with this and you could overlay this zone with School District 11 to see how large it is. Until D11 can do a better job of promoting bond issues and convince the 70% of households without kids within the district that good schools equal good neighborhoods, it will continue to have pockets of good intermingled with pockets of struggling schools and neighborhoods. It really is mixed right now.

Some other good things occurring in Cos;
*Sierra Completions has finally got their FAA repair approval. They are projecting up to 2000 jobs at this facility in the next 3-5 years.
*Frontier Airlines is adding more non-stop flights from Cos around the country at equal to and sometimes better prices than can be found at DIA.
*Launch Charter schoool has opened with a focus on developing an entrepreneurial based education.
*Fourfront CO has opened a Cos based Fuse Impact Center and Catalyst Campus to assist manufacturers and new developing companies with tech, meetings space, and developing contacts.
*Several venture capital organizations are in negotiations for opening offices in Cos bringing tens of millions in capital with them.
*Several SEO/SEC/SEM companies have opened and are achieving increasing customer base while having work environments that are more inline with Silicon Valley than what is typically found locally.
*The greatest number of current job openings in the area tend to be STEM related as opposed to construction and direct military.
*We are seeing a shortage of skilled manufacturing workers as a number of companies have been bringing overseas work back to Cos.

Like I said above, there is still a lot of work to be done, but its got a fair start so far and maybe by the time my kids get out of college, they won't have to leave town to find good jobs.
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Old 03-18-2017, 03:06 PM
 
812 posts, read 1,306,978 times
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Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
I agree with this and you could overlay this zone with School District 11 to see how large it is. Until D11 can do a better job of promoting bond issues and convince the 70% of households without kids within the district that good schools equal good neighborhoods, it will continue to have pockets of good intermingled with pockets of struggling schools and neighborhoods. It really is mixed right now.

Like I said above, there is still a lot of work to be done, but its got a fair start so far and maybe by the time my kids get out of college, they won't have to leave town to find good jobs.
Blaming a school district for not convincing older curmudgeonly misers they should be less curmudgeonly and less miserly is like blaming an alchemist for not doing a better job of transforming lead into gold with some fancy hocus pocus. If that darn alchemist would just TRY HARDER and DO A BETTER JOB of turning base metal into gold, then we'd all be rich. Rich I say. In the real world in which we live, base metals are base metals. Curmudgeons are curmudgeons. Misers are misers. The sun rises in the east and sets in the west. Exceptional students will still be exceptional students regardless of school funding. I should know as I was once an A+ student in a school district with curmudgeonly misers voting down every school funding measure that ever came up despite their vastly increasing property values. The refused to spend a penny of it on kids that weren't their own. Fine. We did without all the "enrichment" programs and had crumbling 50 year old classrooms. The C students still got C's and the A students still got A's and the earth still hurtled through space at the exact same rate as it would have if the curmudgeonly misers of the time (this was the 1980's) had suddenly seen the light and cared one iota about others or the common good or anything for that matter. If they HAD cared one iota I think the earth WOULD maybe have altered course as curmudgeonly misers HAVE NEVER cared one iota. To expect a school district anyplace anytime full of older curmudgeonly misers to vote to increase their taxes for OTHER PEOPLE'S KIDS is a bit rich, don't you think? What is this, Minnesota, where people might actually CARE?

As to the next point about kids from here staying here, I don't hold COS to a standard of providing cushy Fortune 500 company headquarter jobs to keep our kids in town. Not one single young person I know was able to "stay" in our hometown of Santa Monica despite the plethora of corporate jobs. $80K/year jobs don't exactly cut the mustard when tiny 800 square foot "starter" houses cost $1.3M, which our parents bought for $120K and our grandparents bought for $25K. Every single person I know who grew up there had to move away to get started in life. In Colorado Springs, I know DOZENS of professionals (dentists, CPA's, doctors, lawyers, small business owners, etc) earning between $200K and $500K and average houses here cost what 1 year of their income? I wouldn't call that especially unreasonable. Nobody's going to just GIVE IT to you here but it's not all that hard to go GET IT, after one has put in the effort to acquire a skill. I have teenagers and one thing I LOVE about Colorado Springs is that I'm utterly convinced they could have a quality adult life here if they (A) want to and (B) make a reasonable effort. Regardless of the "job market."
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Old 03-18-2017, 05:36 PM
 
4,789 posts, read 6,584,367 times
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It hurts my brain that 2007 was 10 years ago.
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:53 AM
 
2,291 posts, read 2,261,587 times
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Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
Can anyone help clarify some potential misinformation I may have?

So with Boulder, I believe they currently hold the most seats in the county government? It seems like the city of Boulder basically runs most of the decisions in the county, and many of them are self interest and Pro-Boulder. Personally, I just don't *get* Boulder. They seem to love to add thousands upon thousands of high paying jobs, without adding any additional housing, or without building on their green space. I also believe the city of Boulder screwed over the whole region by not letting Google lay down free fiber internet?

Longmont, and all other surrounding cities, have been growing like crazy because Boulder has basically put an artificial cap on their population. So what happens when Longmont grows to a point where they have the majority population. Would they then get majority within the county government? It seems like every city around Boulder hates Boulder. So is it possible that Longmont could basically gobble up the county, and therefore start making decisions against Boulder?
The City of Boulder and Boulder County are run by a small group of people. They use a unique system to stay in power. Such as, the city doesn't have districts for city council and doesn't elect a mayor. All city council spots are voted at large, and keeps different parts of the city from having a voice. The mayor position is elected by the City Council and is really a figurehead position.

In the County, there are only 3 commissioners and each commissioner lives in a distinct district, but again the voting is county wide for each spot. Plus the County Commissioners are party affiliated, so whoever the local Democratic leadership advocates for the primary are almost certain to win the final election. Also, a city can't annex land without permission of a couple different organizations including the county. The annexation is really complicated, but it keeps all the municipalities on the same page, and it's the small group running things's page.

Confusing and seem a bit unfair? That's why Broomfield left Boulder County in the 90's.
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