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Old 08-28-2018, 03:38 PM
 
322 posts, read 374,350 times
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Originally Posted by BrandonCoombes View Post
Was that a guess? Or for sure?
Sure thing
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Old 08-28-2018, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Soda City
488 posts, read 203,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robertsm76 View Post
Sure thing
I wonder what sorts of medical practices.
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Old 08-28-2018, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,843 posts, read 7,634,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonCoombes View Post
I wonder what sorts of medical practices.
Hopefully an Abortion Clinic.
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Old 09-07-2018, 09:48 AM
 
6,144 posts, read 9,353,285 times
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Default Millions for Quiet Zones

So the City will have to spend millions on safety improvements to "quiet" railroads? I grew up in North Columbia miles from the nearest train line.. but I could always hear trains.. especially Amtrak.. as it rode in and out of town in the early morning hours. It was loud then.. I can only imagine the noise living right next to the tracks. That said.. I never really heard or maybe just didn't pay attention to the trains during the other times of the day. This was back in the 70s and 80s.. I wonder if the amount of rail traffic in Columbia has increased since then? I would have thought rail traffic was declining nationally including in Columbia.. the comment from the resident in this article about hearing hundreds of train horns seems overblown unless its coming from heavy handed engineers due to additional federal safety requirements which may explain why its noisier now than back in the day....


The City should allocate the funding to consolidate all the train traffic to the route that runs through North Columbia down past Columbia College in Eau Claire and on through Main Street and Elmwood Park.. This can be accomplished via a "switch" track near Farrow and Fontaine Roads. They could then spend the "quiet" money to quiet those crossings which would eliminate the need to do anything near USC and the Harden Street corridor since that track could be abandoned and turned into a bike trail. All train traffic would run through the vista below grade.


https://www.thestate.com/news/local/...217915810.html


Proposed Switch Track Location that could solve most of Columbia train problems..


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Co...!4d-81.0348144
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Old 09-10-2018, 03:06 AM
 
416 posts, read 244,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
So the City will have to spend millions on safety improvements to "quiet" railroads? I grew up in North Columbia miles from the nearest train line.. but I could always hear trains.. especially Amtrak.. as it rode in and out of town in the early morning hours. It was loud then.. I can only imagine the noise living right next to the tracks. That said.. I never really heard or maybe just didn't pay attention to the trains during the other times of the day. This was back in the 70s and 80s.. I wonder if the amount of rail traffic in Columbia has increased since then? I would have thought rail traffic was declining nationally including in Columbia.. the comment from the resident in this article about hearing hundreds of train horns seems overblown unless its coming from heavy handed engineers due to additional federal safety requirements which may explain why its noisier now than back in the day....


The City should allocate the funding to consolidate all the train traffic to the route that runs through North Columbia down past Columbia College in Eau Claire and on through Main Street and Elmwood Park.. This can be accomplished via a "switch" track near Farrow and Fontaine Roads. They could then spend the "quiet" money to quiet those crossings which would eliminate the need to do anything near USC and the Harden Street corridor since that track could be abandoned and turned into a bike trail. All train traffic would run through the vista below grade.


https://www.thestate.com/news/local/...217915810.html


Proposed Switch Track Location that could solve most of Columbia train problems..


https://www.google.com/maps/place/Co...!4d-81.0348144
I've heard this is an option- what's preventing it from happening? Cost? Train volume? Ownership or usage rights (NS v. CSX)?
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:34 AM
 
6,144 posts, read 9,353,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinagarnet View Post
I've heard this is an option- what's preventing it from happening? Cost? Train volume? Ownership or usage rights (NS v. CSX)?
I believe it is first the RR companies and second cost. The stretch of track that I referenced is a single line for most of its route which would require both RR to share the same track in that area which could create a bottleneck. That said. There are opportunities to upgrade and add additional sidings in some areas and potentially sound walls but that gets into the cost issue. He other issue though less pronounced is potential environmental justice concerns. Which is using federal money in a manner that creates or exacerbates negative environmental issues for minority communities. The line that I reference runs through mostly African American neighborhoods and if there is net increase in train traffic and noise it could be problematic. Therefore there would likely have to be several studies to determine the potential impacts before the federal funds will flow. I suspect for all these reasons and the fact that the Assembly Street and Huger Street crossings are the first priority have delayed it. Both are very very expensive projects that he City can't fund alone
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:37 AM
 
6,144 posts, read 9,353,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinagarnet View Post
I've heard this is an option- what's preventing it from happening? Cost? Train volume? Ownership or usage rights (NS v. CSX)?
I believe it is first the RR companies and second cost. The stretch of track that I referenced is a single line for most of its route which would require both RR to share the same track in that area which could create a bottleneck. That said. There are opportunities to upgrade and add additional sidings in some areas and potentially sound walls but that gets into the cost issue.

The other issue though less pronounced is potential environmental justice concerns. Which is using federal money in a manner that creates or exacerbates negative environmental issues for minority communities. The line that I reference runs through mostly African American neighborhoods and if there is net increase in train traffic and noise it could be problematic. Therefore there would likely have to be several studies to determine the potential impacts before the federal funded flows. I suspect for all these reasons and the fact that the Assembly Street and Huger Street crossings are the first priority have delayed it. Both are very very expensive projects that the City can't fund alone
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:58 AM
 
416 posts, read 244,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
I believe it is first the RR companies and second cost. The stretch of track that I referenced is a single line for most of its route which would require both RR to share the same track in that area which could create a bottleneck. That said. There are opportunities to upgrade and add additional sidings in some areas and potentially sound walls but that gets into the cost issue.

The other issue though less pronounced is potential environmental justice concerns. Which is using federal money in a manner that creates or exacerbates negative environmental issues for minority communities. The line that I reference runs through mostly African American neighborhoods and if there is net increase in train traffic and noise it could be problematic. Therefore there would likely have to be several studies to determine the potential impacts before the federal funded flows. I suspect for all these reasons and the fact that the Assembly Street and Huger Street crossings are the first priority have delayed it. Both are very very expensive projects that the City can't fund alone
Very interesting. I would think the Main Street stretch would impact more residential areas, while the Assembly Street stretch would impact more access routes (from other residential areas). The inherent problem Columbia seems to face is that it essentially has no power over NS or CSX and they have no incentive to do anything for the city. Does the Main Street track have any room to expand (which I know is expensive) or is it limited in terms of clearance to a single track?
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Old 09-10-2018, 12:14 PM
 
6,144 posts, read 9,353,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinagarnet View Post
Very interesting. I would think the Main Street stretch would impact more residential areas, while the Assembly Street stretch would impact more access routes (from other residential areas). The inherent problem Columbia seems to face is that it essentially has no power over NS or CSX and they have no incentive to do anything for the city. Does the Main Street track have any room to expand (which I know is expensive) or is it limited in terms of clearance to a single track?


From a "can it fit" perspective it looks like it does.. but that doesnt take into consideration where the real RR right of way is versus areas where they may have to purchase additional right of way from private property owners because of any required set backs from the tracks. There are also areas where the track rides on embankments that would require siginficant grading/drainage to accomodate a second track. There are also few grade crossings and two or three bridges (one being the iconic Main Street Trestle) that would have to be replaced or added on to. There is also a below grade cut near Elmwood Park and River Drive that may have to be widen that would be an engineering challenge. Again.. the whole line may not have to be double tracked but there should likely be a second track long enough to allow for two freight trains to pass each other at speed limit (whatever that is) without causing a "stop and wait" scenario which woud be a disincentive for the RR companies since they are effectively competing with one another...The RR companies would likely not even fund the study or the engineering of such a route though they would certainly review it and make additional "asks" to make any change worth their while. Right now they simply "listen" to the politicos grouse about the problem.. but only commit to things like "quiet zones" with the caveat that some else pay for it.


The Assembly St and Harden Street crossings are likely the priority because of the impacts on the CBD, USC, Olympia/Rosewood.. and thus that is likely the focus for now. The key for the North Main Route maybe the city having leverage with the RR is if one of the lines is proposed by the RRs for abandonment.. Then the RR that is abandoning their line may be willing to negotiate with the city and the other RR in order to have access to periodically use the remaining line.. If both lines are profitable it will be difficult to get them to change to a sharing arrangement without additional tracks.. which is what happened in the Corridor under the Vista...and why there are two track down there.
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Old 09-19-2018, 01:18 PM
 
1,369 posts, read 1,256,285 times
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Not that this will really come as a surprise to anyone. It’s amazing how stagnant Columbia’s gdp growth was compared to the other metros in the state. It really shows where economic development efforts are focused. To have bigger gains in both Myrtle Beach and Spartanburg is absolutely shameful.

https://www.bea.gov/system/files/201...metro0918.xlsx
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