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Old 05-12-2015, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Columbia, South Carolina
1,710 posts, read 1,510,724 times
Reputation: 358

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColaClemsonFan11 View Post
I think downtown Columbia needs to figure out who to market to as far as residents go.

We have all these new student housing complexes going up and IMO that is a negative in retaining or recruiting new residents that are not students downtown.

I will say this until im blue in the face...post grads dont want to live somewhere dominated by college students. It is hard enough transitioning from being a college student to an adult as is, its ten times harder when youre the minority amongst college kids. You're old enough to be at a different stage in life than they are, yet you are young enough to be jealous of the college kids because you can no longer have the fun theyre having and be considered a functioning member of society and when that's what dominates the area you live in its pretty miserable because everyone is out by the pool and you're stuck in your office
No, no, no. Cities don't need to market to specific slices of the population. Downtown Columbia should have options that appeal to a wide range of people, from students to young professionals to families to empty nesters. Columbia can have students living downtown and that in no way will prevent other people from living there. Sure, a couple in their sixties won't want to live in The Hub, but that has no effect on whether they want to live downtown.

If non-students didn't want to live around students, Boston would be empty. It has one of the highest percentages of college students in the country. Georgetown in DC would be a lot more affordable, too. So would downtown Charleston, for that matter.

People who want to live in urban environments want proximity to things, be it cultural institutions, restaurants, or a neighborhood market. People of all ages can co-exist. They may not share the same apartment building, but they can share the same ZIP code.

Your rationale that college graduates can't stand to be around students is myopic. Cities are for everyone. If you can't stand being around college kids, you won't like most cities.
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Old 05-12-2015, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,634 posts, read 13,799,206 times
Reputation: 2097
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColaClemsonFan11 View Post
I think downtown Columbia needs to figure out who to market to as far as residents go.

We have all these new student housing complexes going up and IMO that is a negative in retaining or recruiting new residents that are not students downtown.

I will say this until im blue in the face...post grads dont want to live somewhere dominated by college students. It is hard enough transitioning from being a college student to an adult as is, its ten times harder when youre the minority amongst college kids. You're old enough to be at a different stage in life than they are, yet you are young enough to be jealous of the college kids because you can no longer have the fun theyre having and be considered a functioning member of society and when that's what dominates the area you live in its pretty miserable because everyone is out by the pool and you're stuck in your office
I'm a USC grad and I never felt what you're describing after I finished school. Several future apartment buildings, some being renovated and some that will come out of the ground, will not be marketed to college students, and most of the apartment buildings that were here before the new student apartment buildings do not market to students. As far as proximity to USC is concerned, the apartment buildings that are going up for students are going up in spots that make sense for USC students to live, and the presence of students in the central business district who are living in the Hub has not phased other patrons of downtown businesses, including those who live there. The volume of people coming downtown in the evenings and on Saturday for Soda City Market and other attractions only continues to grow exponentially, including those who have taken to hanging out on the state house grounds and the groups of people crossing Assembly Street at Gervais - with ease I might add - judging by their body language as they cross, with gobs of time on the walk/don't walk signs. The size and frequency of the groups crossing are most definitely starting to override the psychological barrier of Assembly Street's width. I hope the Clemson students living in downtown Greenville while studying for their MBA degrees aren't causing you stress.
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:16 AM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,518,938 times
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I think everyone kind of missed what I was trying to say and maybe I didn't word it correctly... I dont think it is a bad thing to have a college in a city as a matter of fact it might be a good thing with the opportunity to retain the graduates BUT just like Brussel said..cities are for everyone and with more and more student housing going into an area that already has a shortage of housing for non students...they are the overwhelming majority right now and as a millennial who just graduated...we dont want to live in a place where everything is dominated by college students (and just to clarify, I am referring to undergrads).

Sure Boston and DC have plenty of post grads that dont seem to have that issue...because those cities are not overwhelmingly dominated by college kids. Unfortunately right now on Main Street as far as residents go...there are twice the amount of college kids as there are others...that causes a problem in retaining grads ask any millennial not in college.

That is why I am glad to see the upcoming apartment condo projects in the works that wont be marketed to college kids...there needs to be a lot of those down there and that's what I was wanting to see and fighting for when they came in with the hub.

I'm not saying the Hub cant exist, but there cant be twice as many college kids than post grads/ non-students living in an area if you want to retain non- students.


Also no the Clemson MBA program causes me no stress because they are post grads themselves not undergrads and there are also a lot more young professionals here that far outnumber them so no worries there!
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,634 posts, read 13,799,206 times
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What I'm saying is that the bulk of the people I see in the central business district do not appear to be college students. There are people of all ages and professions in Bourbon any night of the week. It is obvious. All one has to do is be there to see that it is not college-student-oriented. The same goes for Drip, the coffee shop directly across from the Hub. Even at Cantina 76, which does cater to a lot of college students, there are people of all ages. And Michael's on Main, the Good Life Cafe, Sweet Cream and the Nickelodeon Theater are just not college student hangouts. They just aren't. In fact, the owners of Sweet Cream told my spouse and me that they were hoping for Hub residents to discover them up that way and have so far been disappointed, even though they told us their business has really taken off. We ate at Hampton Vineyard last week and there wasn't a college student to be seen there. I just don't feel a heavy student presence on Main Street compared to the population at large. The same goes for the Vista. I am very much in tune to who is out and about and even delight in eves-dropping in conversations when it is convenient and undetectable, and Columbia is hereby officially a city where everyone is taking part in a strong and strengthening downtown renaissance.
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
667 posts, read 606,767 times
Reputation: 188
While I understand what colaclemson is saying, I completely second what Columbiadata says when he alludes to the fact that main st is nowhere close to be "overrun" by college students. Not by a longshot, and I live there. they seem to make their presence known much less than Even I had anticipated. I have lived on main st since March of 2014 , so I was there before they moved in and while main st in general seems to be getting busier as the months go on, I don't feel the makeup of the people is much different pre- and post- HUB. And I'm a pretty straightforward person and am not just saying this to make the area look better or something just because I live there. In fact, one thing I wish that could happen is for Main Street to have more life on it later at night past lady st, say, at 11 or 12 on a Friday night. that will happen eventually but for those who worried (and I think I myself thought it would be a possibility) that main st would turn Into five points when the students moved in.. That is far from the case, even less so that I would have thought.

Last edited by Bouje2; 05-12-2015 at 11:07 AM..
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:56 AM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,396,115 times
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Developers are using college students as a base for residential development, but you're already beginning to see more developments geared towards non-college students. I think some of us are just getting a little too antsy a little too quickly, although the concern is understandable.
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Old 05-12-2015, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
667 posts, read 606,767 times
Reputation: 188
Another nice perk about student housing is, all else equal, it puts downward price pressure on all rentals, since students also have a relatively large presence in rental homes and duplexes across the city.
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Old 05-12-2015, 11:47 AM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,518,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bouje2 View Post
While I understand what colaclemson is saying, I completely second what Columbiadata says when he alludes to the fact that main st is nowhere close to be "overrun" by college students. Not by a longshot, and I live there. they seem to make their presence known much less than Even I had anticipated. I have lived on main st since March of 2014 , so I was there before they moved in and while main st in general seems to be getting busier as the months go on, I don't feel the makeup of the people is much different pre- and post- HUB. And I'm a pretty straightforward person and am not just saying this to make the area look better or something just because I live there. In fact, one thing I wish that could happen is for Main Street to have more life on it later at night past lady st, say, at 11 or 12 on a Friday night. that will happen eventually but for those who worried (and I think I myself thought it would be a possibility) that main st would turn Into five points when the students moved in.. That is far from the case, even less so that I would have thought.
That is really good to hear and actually March 2014 is when I moved out of Barringer after living there for a little under a year and moved out of Columbia so I have missed the whole Hub wave but I am very glad to see it hasn't changed the make up of Main Street.

I really wasn't necessarily referring to how Columbia is more just the fear of that happening which when I lived there was why I was so vocal against the Hub but now that is seems to have not affected Main as I we all feared and more non-college developments are going in down there I think it will be much more attractive to post grads.
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Old 05-13-2015, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,634 posts, read 13,799,206 times
Reputation: 2097
The CEO of City Center Partnership will have the opportunity to meet with retail real estate professionals at a conference coming up in Las Vegas.

City Center Partnership
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:55 PM
 
6,183 posts, read 9,418,347 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColaClemsonFan11 View Post
I think everyone kind of missed what I was trying to say and maybe I didn't word it correctly... I dont think it is a bad thing to have a college in a city as a matter of fact it might be a good thing with the opportunity to retain the graduates BUT just like Brussel said..cities are for everyone and with more and more student housing going into an area that already has a shortage of housing for non students...they are the overwhelming majority right now and as a millennial who just graduated...we dont want to live in a place where everything is dominated by college students (and just to clarify, I am referring to undergrads).

Sure Boston and DC have plenty of post grads that dont seem to have that issue...because those cities are not overwhelmingly dominated by college kids. Unfortunately right now on Main Street as far as residents go...there are twice the amount of college kids as there are others...that causes a problem in retaining grads ask any millennial not in college.

That is why I am glad to see the upcoming apartment condo projects in the works that wont be marketed to college kids...there needs to be a lot of those down there and that's what I was wanting to see and fighting for when they came in with the hub.

I'm not saying the Hub cant exist, but there cant be twice as many college kids than post grads/ non-students living in an area if you want to retain non- students.


Also no the Clemson MBA program causes me no stress because they are post grads themselves not undergrads and there are also a lot more young professionals here that far outnumber them so no worries there!

DC and Boston also have THE JOBs to keep young people who will eventually be come couples and may opt to live downtown.. Hopefully some of the progress at Innovista will help make that happen here as well..

Maybe the student housing boom will draw students away from Rosewood and parts of Waverly and increase the rental/homeownership market in these intown neighborhoods for the non student popluation that want to be close but not in the action? I can see Waverly (both above and below Gervais) along with Columbia Commons/Cottontown, Earlewood Park, and maybe Hyatt Park becoming more popular if there is a shortage of say regular housing or apartments downtown. I wonder if Colonial Heights will finally be able to turn the corner and become a favored intown neighborhood like Cottontown? It seems like a perfect area to renovate and or build new homes on existing lots for those workers at Richland Memorial......Its also close to downtown and now Columbia Commons

Last edited by Woodlands; 05-14-2015 at 02:04 PM..
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